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Jack Fate
01-02-2011, 07:33 AM
Anyone sailing in the Winter months? What are you sailing? Where are you sailing? How big is the fleet you sail in?
Here in New Rochelle, NY, western end of LIS, we are sailing Lasers and something called a JC 9. Get a dozen or more Lasers out on any given weekend. The make-up of the fleet has gone from big boat sailors jonesing for the fix, to a wide range of sailors of a 50 something crowd down to teenagers from the Huguenot Junior Sailing Program. Interesting mix with the elders offering the youngins advice on rules and boat handling.
So what are you all up to?

aA
01-02-2011, 10:07 AM
i remember a st fyc spring dinghy a couple of years ago where it was sub 20 degrees out, there was a 37 car pile up on the marin side of the gg bridge because of snow on the road, and we wore two wetsuits at one time and still looked according to my wife, like popsicles when we pulled the 14 out. i think that's the closest i've ever been to frostbiting

here you have a midwinter just about every weekend through the off season. and jr sailing every sunday except for the first and holidays

aA
01-02-2011, 11:08 AM
largest run-on sentence ever!

doghouse
01-02-2011, 05:34 PM
Do what I do, go south of the equator. Problem solved.

Snaggletooth
01-03-2011, 10:34 AM
largest run-on sentence ever!

Earneste Hemmigway had manny runnons to hist credite;

"That something I cannot yet define completely but the feeling comes when you write well and truly of something and know impersonally you have written in that way and those who are paid to read it and report on it do not like the subject so they say it is all a fake, yet you know its value absolutely; or when you do something which people do not consider a serious occupation and yet you know truly, that it is as important and has always been as important as all the things that are in fashion, and when, on the sea, you are alone with it and know that this Gulf Stream you are living with, knowing, learning about, and loving, has moved, as it moves, since before man, and that it has gone by the shoreline of that long, beautiful, unhappy island since before Columbus sighted it and that the things you find out about it, and those that have always lived in it are permanent and of value because that stream will flow, as it has flowed, after the Indians, after the Spaniards, after the British, after the Americans and after all the Cubans and all the systems of governments, the richness, the poverty, the martyrdom, the sacrifice and the venality and the cruelty are all gone as the high-piled scow of garbage, bright-colored, white-flecked, ill-smelling, now tilted on its side, spills off its load into the blue water, turning it a pale green to a depth of four or five fathoms as the load spreads across the surface, the sinkable part going down and the flotsam of palm fronds, corks, bottles, and used electric light globes, seasoned with an occasional condom or a deep floating corset, the torn leaves of a student's exercise book, a well-inflated dog, the occasional rat, the no-longer-distinguished cat; all this well shepherded by the boats of the garbage pickers who pluck their prizes with long poles, as interested, as intelligent, and as accurate as historians; they have the viewpoint; the stream, with no visible flow, takes five loads of this a day when things are going well in La Habana and in ten miles along the coast it is as clear and blue and unimpressed as it was ever before the tug hauled out the scow; and the palm fronds of our victories, the worn light bulbs of our discoveries and the empty condoms of our great loves float with no significance against one single, lasting thing---the stream.

424! (I thick)

aA
01-03-2011, 11:18 AM
thanks snags, that made me feel better

Charlie Tuna
01-03-2011, 11:54 AM
http://www.yra.org/racing/master_calendar.html

The 2011 YRA Master Calendar for San Francisco Bay is out now!

B.J. Porter
01-03-2011, 09:43 PM
Anyone sailing in the Winter months? What are you sailing? Where are you sailing? How big is the fleet you sail in?
Here in New Rochelle, NY, western end of LIS, we are sailing Lasers and something called a JC 9. Get a dozen or more Lasers out on any given weekend. The make-up of the fleet has gone from big boat sailors jonesing for the fix, to a wide range of sailors of a 50 something crowd down to teenagers from the Huguenot Junior Sailing Program. Interesting mix with the elders offering the youngins advice on rules and boat handling.
So what are you all up to?

We just wrapped up Laser frostbiting at our club on 1/1/11 with our Frozen Bowl Regatta. Generally we start in October and go to January 1. Our cove tends to get iced up late December/January onwards. Half of it was covered in ice on Saturday even though it was around 50F. Tough to get the boats off the ramp, and sailing in slushy water = not fast.

I've thought about going over to Bristol, but I'm not sure I'm ready to expose a R/C I don't know to my "special" brand of dinghy sailing.


Some pix & video, yours truly is sail #2 (looks like 5 also, with the bleed through from the other side).

http://eastgreenwich.patch.com/articles/new-year-starts-out-with-a-thaw

hobot
01-04-2011, 12:07 AM
1st part of vid...looks like fun, that guy you crossed protest you?
2nd part of vid...ba-urrr!
3rd part....cool!

B.J. Porter
01-04-2011, 08:40 AM
1st part of vid...looks like fun, that guy you crossed protest you?
2nd part of vid...ba-urrr!
3rd part....cool!

That wasn't me on the yellow boat, that's a 15 year old kid. I'm way the hell over by the pin at that start, you can barely see me barely moving over there. You can see me coming up to the mark right at the end of the down wind.

The "boat" was our fuel dock so the pin was on the other end.

PD Staff
01-12-2011, 02:40 PM
http://pressure-drop.us/imagehost/images/11920219749047024242.jpg
© Jeff Stevens Newport Patch

Besides the crazy crab fishermen on "The Most Dangerous Catch," who else would venture out on the bay in winds gusting to 25 knots and temperatures hovering in the mid-30s? The answer is the men and women who make up Newport's Fleet 413.

On Sunday afternoons from early November to mid-April, between 20 and 50 sailors suit up, rig their 14-foot long Lasers, and race them around Newport harbor. The winner earns bragging rights for being the best in the bay...and beyond, as a number of the contestants are former Olympians and others have won International Regattas. It's like coming to play in a neighborhood pick-up baseball game only to find that some of the players are members of the Red Sox.


http://pressure-drop.us/imagehost/images/27167953095446078685.jpg
© Jeff Stevens Newport Patch

"When I started four years ago, there were 70 boats on the starting line," said John Graham, a race committee member and Newport native. "Usually in the fall and spring there are 40 to 50 boats and then in the winter there may be fewer."

On a day like Sunday, with choppy waves and blasts of wind, it pays for both the sailor and the boat to be in good shape.

"With the waves like they are today, it's like riding an ATV on the water," Mike Mahoney, of Jamestown, said.

The races are organized by a race committee who set the marks, send the sailors around them in a variety of course configurations, make sure the starts and finishes are tracked and act as umpires if there are any infractions. Along with calling out the numbers as sailors crossed the finish lines, Portsmouth's Steve Kirkpatrick offered advice and encouragement to passersby. In return, as a unanimous show of good sportsmanship, all of the sailors thanked the committee for a job well done.

Twenty sailors ended up completing seven races on Sunday and quite a few ended up at the International Yacht and Athletic Club for a hot slice of pizza and a bracer to wash it down. The results of the races were calculated and Andy Pimental came out on top for the day, just barely besting Peter Shope.

Others were not so fortunate, such as Newport's Stuart Streulli, who was T-boned by Mark Bear and had to retire early with a 6-inch crack in his hull. After a quick visit to the shop, it is likely he'll be back next week.

http://newport.patch.com/articles/frigid-frostbiters-sail-newport-harbor#photo-4381863

Jack Fate
01-12-2011, 02:55 PM
Man that looks cold.....I just hate falling out of my Laser like that poor bastard!
Gonna be like 22 degrees and a stiff NW breeze in LIS this Sunday.......maybe I'll use my daughter's radial rig.

familysailor
01-12-2011, 08:37 PM
Man that looks cold.....I just hate falling out of my Laser like that poor bastard!
Gonna be like 22 degrees and a stiff NW breeze in LIS this Sunday.......maybe I'll use my daughter's radial rig.

Hijack:

Gotta see some pictures of your barge home. Details about water, power, er,.. sewage, and other practical details would be great to hear. The contrast to living in a sixties tract home would be interesting..

End Hijack.

Jack Fate
01-13-2011, 03:26 PM
Well for starters it isn't a "barge home". The location that I filled out in my profile was based on the criticisms of a couple of jackasses on Sailing Anarchy. Essentially someone local, who goes by the screen name over there as RandyNJ, to where we live thought he was being cute with a less than flattering assessment of our accommodations. akaGP then took it to the next level describing our home as it appears in my profile here.
Funny thing happened the other day. John Esposito (of the "Espo is a Dick" thread fame) came into my office. There is a 18" x 24" picture there of my boat under sail. He asked what it was and I explained to him that it was my backwater barge. He was throughly impressed.
So that is the back story as to how that came into being. In reality we live on a Hylas 42. Built the boat back in 1986 as a cutter with a custom Sparcraft rig, over sized winch package and a semi-custom interior. The only thing we did to make it a comfortable live-aboard was to add a Webasto 2010 diesel powered hydronic heat system.
That said, we are currently negotiating to purchase a house. So if you know anyone who wants to buy a Hylas 42, let me know.

B.J. Porter
01-13-2011, 08:10 PM
Man that looks cold.....I just hate falling out of my Laser like that poor bastard!
Gonna be like 22 degrees and a stiff NW breeze in LIS this Sunday.......maybe I'll use my daughter's radial rig.

Those Newport guys are WAY out of my league; I'd probably (literally) die if I try to show off my "special" Laser skills down there. They have fun though.

IOR Geezer
01-13-2011, 09:16 PM
Looks like a coronary waiting to happen.

Back to the fire, my Rémy Martin and a nice book for me.

familysailor
01-13-2011, 10:18 PM
Well for starters it isn't a "barge home". The location that I filled out in my profile was based on the criticisms of a couple of jackasses on Sailing Anarchy. Essentially someone local, who goes by the screen name over there as RandyNJ, to where we live thought he was being cute with a less than flattering assessment of our accommodations. akaGP then took it to the next level describing our home as it appears in my profile here.
Funny thing happened the other day. John Esposito (of the "Espo is a Dick" thread fame) came into my office. There is a 18" x 24" picture there of my boat under sail. He asked what it was and I explained to him that it was my backwater barge. He was throughly impressed.
So that is the back story as to how that came into being. In reality we live on a Hylas 42. Built the boat back in 1986 as a cutter with a custom Sparcraft rig, over sized winch package and a semi-custom interior. The only thing we did to make it a comfortable live-aboard was to add a Webasto 2010 diesel powered hydronic heat system.
That said, we are currently negotiating to purchase a house. So if you know anyone who wants to buy a Hylas 42, let me know.

Crap! I was imagining all the col things you could do to an old barge......

Okay, So, How about pics of the Hylas?
Details and pics re: the Webasto heating system would be interesting too.

InNeedOfSomeRestraint
01-14-2011, 11:55 PM
Frostbiting? No thanks!

Though if you're in the Northeast and are looking for GREAT laser frostbiting then CPYC in Westport CT runs from Oct-Dec and March-Apr (I believe). Costs are low and people come from as far away as New Jersey to sail every weekend which leads to 20-30 standard boats on the line every weekend and 10 or so in the radial class. All of this is conjecture however and I may or may not sail for one of the main organizers of the program.

PD Staff
01-26-2011, 01:44 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roAZHZDEXY0


January 25, 2011

The Sublime Pleasures of Frostbiting

Courtesy SailingWorld.Com (http://www.sailingworld.com/blogs/racing/the-sublime-pleasures-of-frostbiting)
by Tim Zimmermann

When most people envision a perfect sailing scenario, they think of warm breezes and T-shirt weather. I like that, too, of course (you gotta go to Cabarete, if this is your ideal). And, sure, most of the sailing world right now is coming down off their warm Key West high, feeling all smug and superior. But increasingly, I am finding that the most fun I have sailing and racing my Laser is when the skies are gray, the air temps are cold, and there's the possibility of snow.

Yep, there's an excellent Laser frostbiting fleet here in Washington, D.C., courtesy of the Potomac River Sailing Association. They race just south of Reagan National Airport, on the river or in a shifty, flat-water cove that's ideal for cold-weather sailing. I started racing with them a few years ago as a way to get outside on winter Sundays and make Laser-sailing a year-round thing. There are usually 15-20 Lasers racing, the competition is good and friendly, and the fleet is really well-organized. It’s everything you want, except, in theory, the cold weather. But now I find myself seduced by the sublime pleasure of winter sailing, too.


Of course, racing in cold weather in a small boat that goes upside down easily requires a slightly different approach. The fleet has a rule of thumb that if the wind speed exceeds the air temps, you think twice about sailing. Come to think of it, that rule would be REALLY wise to follow for anyone who sails in warm climes. And cold weather does sometimes prevent racing, as it did this past weekend, when ice sheets floated across the race course. The one guy who did go out still managed to have fun, and came up with some useful frostbiting rules of thumb: 1) Don't sail into an ice field on an ebb tide—its ugly; 2) Set the sail at the dock to something you can live with—frozen control lines don't move; 3) If you notice the RC boat has been hauled out, you might oughta head back to the dock.

The icy winter has also forced our frostbite fleet to resolve some difficult philosophical questions via the PRSA group e-mail list, such as: what kind of ice floes should be considered obstructions under the rules of sailing? I think the answer was black ice that would stop you short, as opposed to slushy, white ice you could potentially sail through, albeit slowly.


But the truth is, while there might be a few weekends per winter that require a hefty dram of masochism paired with a hefty dram of post-race whiskey, frostbiting in Washington, D.C., rarely involves actual frost. Hats off to those fleets further north, on Long Island Sound, Narragansett Bay, and beyond. So, while your friends might be impressed with how tough and dedicated you are to the sport of sailing—and one of the pleasures of frostbiting is to NOT disabuse them of this view—the reality is you're often enjoying spectacular, 50-degree days.

In any case, whatever the temperature, a dry suit combined with modern fleecy layers can keep you as warm as you like. I often find myself sweating and taking off my hat to cool down by letting the steam rise from my head. The only real cold-weather dilemma I grapple with, truth be told, is whether to sail with gloves or not, since I can never find gloves that give me the same line feel and grip as my bare hands. Last week, I sailed commando in 37 degrees, and it was fine, with my overheated core pumping lots of warm blood into my naked digits. Nor sure it would be as simple in Newport, R.I. The video below comes from a Patch.com story about Newport's frostbiting scene

The fun of frostbiting is much more than about being comfortable. I always have more fun when I'm doing something that most of the rest of the world thinks I shouldn't be doing. And winter sailing has its own feel—the trees are bare, the wildlife is different, and there's no traffic on the water. It's stark, yet beautiful in its own way. And somehow the world closes in on you a bit, creating a special sphere of isolation in the wider winter world. Everything—the cold, hard gusts, the chilled spray, the diffused light of a winter-yellow sun—feels unique. Planes are landing overhead. You're sharing a unique world with people who're also happy to be out there. You're sailing your Laser in January. You're racing in a tight fleet. What could be better than that?

http://potomacriversailing.org/

http://www.sailingworld.com/blogs/racing/the-sublime-pleasures-of-frostbiting