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View Full Version : Honey and Tunicliffe:US SAILING’s 2010 Rolex Yachtsman & Yachtswoman of the Year



PD Staff
01-05-2011, 12:11 PM
PORTSMOUTH, R.I. (January 5, 2011) – Trophée Jules Verne winner Stan Honey (Palo Alto, Calif.) and Snipe Women’s World Champion Anna Tunnicliffe (Plantation, Fla.) today were named US SAILING’s 2010 Rolex Yachtsman and Yachtswoman of the Year. A shortlist of 10 male and six female sailors – determined from nominations submitted by members of US SAILING – was evaluated by a panel of sailing journalists who selected these two sailors for the noteworthy distinction. The winners will be honored on February 25, 2011, during a luncheon at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan, when they will be presented with specially-engraved Rolex timepieces.

Established in 1961 by US SAILING and sponsored by Rolex Watch, U.S.A. since 1980, the annual presentation of US SAILING's Rolex Yachtsman and Yachtswoman of the Year awards are considered the sport's ultimate recognition of an individual’s outstanding on-the-water achievements for the calendar year. Over its history the coveted award has been presented to 39 men and 32 women.

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2010 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year: Stan Honey (Palo Alto, Calif.), previously nominated for the Rolex Yachtsman of the Year Award in 2006 as the Volvo Ocean Race winning navigator aboard ABN Amro One, was cited as “one of the most outstanding offshore sailors known world-wide” by a member of the award’s selection panel that recognized him as the 2010 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year. Honey becomes the second American in the history of the award to receive the honor for the fastest circumnavigation of the globe. Cam Lewis won the Rolex Yachtsman of the Year Award in 1993 for winning the Jules Verne prize aboard Commodore Explorer with a record time of 79 days, six hours, 15 minutes and 56 seconds – a record which had been surpassed five subsequent times before the trimaran Groupama 3, with Honey as navigator, set the latest benchmark. In 48 days, seven hours and 45 minutes, Groupama 3 made the fastest non-stop circumnavigation under sail in history and claimed the Trophée Jules Verne while eclipsing a record – by more than two days and eight hours – that had stood for five years. Another member of the selection panel noted that Groupama 3 would not have broken the record without Honey correctly calling the weather window when they had to re-start after the first attempt was thwarted (a break down in the South Atlantic forced them to retire to fix the boat). “He did an extraordinary job getting the boat around the planet. This was the crowning achievement for a hell of a career,” said the panel member.

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After sailing around the world, some might have expected Honey to spend some time on dry land, but in mid-June he was taking aim at another record, this time in the Newport Bermuda Race as navigator aboard Speedboat. “I've been navigator on Speedboat since she was built, so I carried on,” said Honey. “You get hooked on spending time at sea.” After leading the 183-boat fleet for most of the 635 nautical-mile race, Speedboat was the first boat to cross the line after racing for 59 hours.

“I am honored to receive the US SAILING Rolex Yachtsman of the Year Award,” said Honey upon hearing the news. “It is humbling to read through the list of previous winners. As an American, it was an unexpected opportunity and honor to be asked to sail with the legendary all-French Groupama offshore multihull crew. Groupama 3’s success in the Jules Verne is a tribute to Franck Cammas’ leadership and the seamanship of the entire crew. I would also like to thank Rolex and US SAILING for all they do to support sailing.”

After graduating from Yale University (New Haven, Conn.) with a degree in Engineering and Applied Science, and from Stanford University (Palo Alto, Calif.) with a Masters in Science Electrical Engineering, Honey, in 1998, co-founded Sportvision Inc. which evolved into the leading developer of live-tracking enhancements for sports TV broadcasts. Honey led the development of the yellow first-down line for televised football; the NASCAR racecar tracking and highlighting system; and the baseball K-Zone system, which highlights the pitch location and strike zone in televised baseball. He holds eight patents in navigational system design, 21 patents for TV special effects, is a member of the board of directors of KVH (a manufacturer of satellite communications and navigation sensors), and currently works for the America's Cup Event Authority on TV technology for the America's Cup. Honey is married to Sally Lindsay Honey, herself a two-time Yachtswoman of the Year (1972, ’73).

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2010 Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year: Having been shortlisted for the Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year Award for the sixth consecutive year, Snipe Women’s World Champion Anna Tunnicliffe (Plantation, Fla.) has become the first woman in the award’s history to earn it three consecutive years. The achievement is the latest milestone for this sailing phenom as she joins Jane Pegel (1964, ’71, ’72) and Jan O’Malley (1969, ’70, ’77) in the record book as three-time winners of the Yachtswoman of the Year distinction. Only two women have won the Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year title more: JJ Fetter Isler (1986, ‘ 91, ’97, ’00) and Betsy Alison, whose five honors (1981, ’82, ’84, ’93 and ‘98) have eclipsed even Ted Turner’s four title wins, the most for any American man.

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Tunnicliffe’s position at the forefront of women’s sailing, both nationally and internationally, appears deceivingly effortless. The selection panel lauded the number of classes in which she competes and is competitive in. “She hardly trains in the Laser Radial anymore, yet wins when she sails that boat,” remarked one panelist about the 2008 Laser Olympic Gold Medalist who won the 2010 Laser Radial Women’s North American Championship. Another panelist commented that “she is our modern-day Betsy Alison – doing it all.”

In 2009, Tunnicliffe, previously ranked number one in the world in the Laser Radial, committed to a match racing campaign in the Elliott 6 Metre with a goal of racing in the 2012 Olympic Games. In just two years she has moved from 36th to fourth in the match race rankings – a clear demonstration that her goal is within reach.

During 2010 Tunnicliffe raced in the Elliott 6 Metre to win US SAILING’s Rolex Miami OCR; place second at Semaine Olympique Française in Hyères, France; and take third at Skandia Sail For Gold in Weymouth, England, site of the 2012 Olympic Regatta. She won the XII International Women’s Match Race Criterium in Calpe, Spain, sailed in Tom 28s, and was second at the Toyota International Match Race in Detroit, Michigan in Ultimate 20s. She picked up a bronze medal in the match racing event at Kieler Woche in Germany and also placed third in the BoatU.S. Santa Maria Cup in Annapolis, Md., sailing in J/22s.

The 28-year-old Tunnicliffe, a native of England, grew up in Perrysburg, Ohio, sailing from the North Cape Yacht Club in Michigan. Her college sailing career at Old Dominion University (Norfolk, Va.), where she earned ICSA All-American honors three times (2003, ’04, ’05), was highlighted with being named the 2005 Quantum Female College Sailor of the Year.

“I'm very excited and honored to again be selected for the Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year Award,” said Tunnicliffe. “I knew it would be tough to get it this year, so it was a great surprise when I heard the news. I have to thank my teammates for this year. It was a group effort at the Snipe Worlds and all of the match racing events. Molly [Vandemoer] and Debbie [Capozzi] are fantastic crew and played a huge part in this award!”

For additional racing results for each winner, please visit: http://about.ussailing.org/Awards/Rolex.htm.

btbotfa
01-05-2011, 12:27 PM
Great job acknowledging the Navigator, sometimes the hero, sometimes the goat....

Born 2 Sail
01-06-2011, 02:10 PM
Congratulations Stan!

PD Staff
01-08-2011, 06:24 PM
Paul V. Oliva, Special to The Chronicle




While San Francisco City Hall celebrated the city's successful bid to host the America's Cup on Wednesday, one of sailing's most coveted awards went to a Palo Alto man best known not for sailing, ironically, but for creating the moving yellow first-down line in televised football.

That's not to trivialize Stan Honey's sailing accomplishments. It highlights his brilliance.

He's one of the best in the world at working out the complex probabilities and geometries of harnessing wind and sea to get a boat as swiftly as possible around the globe.

At noon Wednesday, Honey was named U.S. Sailing's 2010 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year from a short list of 10 nominees submitted by U.S. Sailing members.

This year, a trimaran called Groupama 3, with Honey as navigator, won the Trophée Jules Verne for the fastest nonstop circumnavigation under sail in history. Groupama 3 sailed around the world in 48 days, seven hours and 45 minutes. That shaved more than two days and eight hours off the previous record.

Key weather call
One member of the selection panel noted that Groupama 3 would not have broken the record without Honey correctly calling a key weather window to start the successful record run. "He did an extraordinary job getting the boat around the planet. This was the crowning achievement for a hell of a career," said the panel member.

Previously nominated in 2006 as winning navigator in the Volvo Ocean Race around the world, Honey was cited by another panel member as "one of the most outstanding offshore sailors known worldwide."

Honey is only the second American in the history of the award to receive the honor for the fastest circumnavigation of the globe. Cam Lewis won the Rolex Yachtsman of the Year Award in 1993 for winning the Jules Verne prize aboard Commodore Explorer with a record time of 79 days, six hours, 15 minutes and 56 seconds.

In mid-June, Honey took aim at another record in the 635-nautical-mile Newport Bermuda Race as navigator aboard the aptly named Speedboat. Speedboat was the first of 184 boats to cross the finish line after 59 hours.

"You get hooked on spending time at sea," says Honey.

Few people bring together technology and sport like Honey. A Stanford University graduate, Honey co-founded Sportvision Inc. in Mountain View in 1998, which evolved into the leading developer of live-tracking enhancements for sports TV broadcasts: The yellow first-down line for televised football, the NASCAR racecar tracking and highlighting system, and the baseball K-Zone system, which highlights the pitch location and strike zone in televised baseball.

He holds eight patents in navigational system design and 21 patents for TV special effects. He now works for the America's Cup Event Authority on TV technology for the America's Cup.

Honey is married to Sally Lindsay Honey, herself a two-time Yachts-woman of the Year in 1972 and 1973.

He said he felt honored by Wednesday's announcement. "It is humbling to read through the list of previous winners." He said it was an unexpected opportunity and honor to sail with the noted all-French crew on Groupama. He cited skipper Franck Cammas' leadership and the seamanship of the entire crew, and thanked Rolex and U.S. Sailing for all they do to support sailing.

Olympian winner
Announced as U.S. Sailing Yachtswoman of the year was 28-year-old Olympic gold medalist Anna Tunnicliffe of Plantation, Fla. Selected from a short list of six female sailors, she's the first woman in the award's history to win it three consecutive years. Tunnicliffe said her crew, Molly Vandemoer of Redwood City and Debbie Capozzi of Bayport, N.Y., "played a huge part in this award."

A panel of sailing journalists from around the nation selected Honey and Tunnicliffe. The winners will be honored Feb. 25 during a luncheon at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan, when they will be presented with specially engraved Rolex timepieces.

U.S. Sailing established the award in 1961, sponsored since 1980 by Rolex Watch, U.S.A. It is considered sailing's ultimate recognition of an individual's outstanding on-the-water achievements for the calendar year. It has been presented to 39 men and 32 women.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/01/07/DDV11H5GTM.DTL#ixzz1AV7IA69U

PD Staff
02-08-2011, 08:53 AM
Kim Livingston reflects on Stan Honey's accomplishments on Groupama 3 and the Jules Verne Trophy


Stan Honey’s status as the navigator of the fastest-ever circumnavigation is safe.

For a while.


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A broken Banque Populaire V is even now sailing back to France—a nighttime collision damaged a daggerboard beyond repair, just as the boat was approaching an entry point to the Southern Ocean—and there will be no one threatening Groupama 3’s 48-day round-the-world record when Stan Honey is honored as Rolex US Yachtsman of the Year in New York City on February 25.

But, talk to Stan about the boatride that secured the Trophée Jules Verne and you’ll discover that it was a cultural experience as well as a sailing experience. He was, after all, the only American in the crew, the lone Yank surrounded by the “Brittany mafia” as he calls them.

“In France,” Honey says, “professional sailing works in a healthy and sensible way that we are not familiar with in this country. You have sponsors that come into the game and stay, because it works for them. Groupama is an international insurance group headquartered in Paris, and they have had a special relationship with Franck Cammas for going on sixteen years. There’s a budget of $20 million or so every year, and Cammas has as many as four projects going on at a time. Franck has two giant buildings in Lorient, naval architects, a construction crew—and I talked to his sponsors, and I asked what they like about this, and yes they like the internet hits and the magazine stories, but what they really like is the venue-based entertainment. Very much like NASCAR. ”

And life aboard a 105-foot trimaran on a mission to set a record around the world?

I’ve sailed a lot with Kiwis, and the obvious difference with the French is the food. The Kiwi way of working with dehydrated food is to dump all the powder into an insulated pot, pour in a few quarts of hot water, stir it with a winch handle, and call it done. You get the same meal every eight hours. There’s never a ‘breakfast,’ never a ‘dinner.’ By the time you’ve finished a lap of the world on a Kiwi boat you don’t want to ever see freeze-drieds again. The French? Well, the French take pride in their cooking, and even if it’s freeze-drieds they’ll have a couple of pots working, do up some noodles, a dash of olive oil, it really makes a difference. We carried dried hams from Spain, cheeses that last, and there’s a baker in Brittany who has been triple-baking bread for sailors for generations. Big, flat loaves that are good for, well, forever. We had that bread for a month, with no mold and no special care. They were just piled up like crispies.

“And, on a Kiwi boat, it’s considered bad form to look over the shoulder of the navigator and offer suggestions. On a French boat, there is always someone looking over your shoulder, and I did get a bit more advice than I’m used to.”

So why an American navigator on a French boat?

“I asked Franck about that, and his concern was that his French guys, coming out of shorthanded sailing, tend to take a quick and dirty approach. He wanted the boat to be navigated the way a Volvo Ocean Race is navigated, where you have a full-time person who’s making every last risk assessment, trying to get everything exactly right, leaving nothing on the table. It was an honor to sail in that community, and they were very supportive.

“Franck’s sailors are jack-of-all-trades, mechanics, navigators, sailmakers, electricians, riggers, and for shorthanded competition they’ve had to incorporate the concept of triage, that you cannot get everything right all the time. You have to decide what’s most important and take care of that, and take care of yourself. Get rest. Stay dry. They bring that sensibility to offshore sailing. Groupama 3 was properly, I could even say, cleverly, rigged, and they had gone to a great deal of trouble to make sure that it stays dry belowdecks. The experience could not be more different from a Volvo Race, where there’s water sloshing around constantly and you’re always bailing and you’re always cold and wet.”

[Honey navigated ABN AMRO ONE to a win in the 2005-06 Volvo Ocean Race.]

“On Groupama 3 the traveler and the gennaker sheet were hand-held, all the way around the world. People ask if I worried about flipping the boat, and the answer is, not really, not with some of the best sailors in the world hands-on. The other side of that is, Franck is prepping now for the next Volvo Race, which he says is much harder but less stressful than the Jules Verne trip. When I pushed him on that, he said, in a Volvo boat what’s the worst that can happen? Maybe you get knocked down and the boat is on its side and you have a mess. With a big multihull the worst that can happen is you go upside down and maybe lose the boat. Franck has a unique perspective on that because he has capsized more large, offshore multihulls than any other human.”

Yes, and he flipped Groupama 3 on a previous attempt at a Jules Verne record, so we know it can be done. What about your watch system?

We had ten guys and three watches. It was three on, three off, three on standby, suited up. I was on standby all the time, whether I was navigating or asleep. I was on deck for every maneuver we made, all the way around the world. But when there was nothing much going on I was free to just navigate. They guys were very cool about it. They were always offering me a trick at the wheel, but I couldn’t spend much time there without starting to think that I wasn’t adding to the performance of the boat, that if I stood there steering for too long I could be missing something as a navigator.”

On a boat that large, averaging 24.74 knots through the water for 28,691 miles, what is the conversation about safety?

“Everybody carries a knife, and everybody is experienced at cutting through the trampoline in case of capsize, but nobody wants to experience that. We carried life rafts—in case of fire—but there was one safety feature I liked a lot. In case of an overboard, the GPS emergency button that you would push to mark the spot was keyed to also pneumatically release the overboard gear. Push that button and your buoy hits the water instantly. We did a whole day of drills, and in most cases the gear dropped right beside the person in the water. That is so much better than expecting someone to run and pull a pin and you’ll be who knows how far away when the gear hits the water. There is no such thing as a quickstop in one of these boats. You have to furl and reef, and you’ll probably be coming back from two miles away. ”

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PD Staff
02-25-2011, 02:24 PM
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Stan and Anna show of their newest apparel


Stan Honey and Anna Tunnicliffe Honored at US SAILING’s
Rolex Yachtsman and Yachtswoman of the Year Ceremony
New York, N.Y. (Feb. 25, 2011) – Humble beginnings have evolved into fruitful sailing careers for Stan Honey (Palo Alto, Calif.) and Anna Tunnicliffe (Plantation, Fla.), US SAILING’s Rolex Yachtsman and Yachtswoman of the Year, who were feted today during a luncheon held at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan.

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Humble begginings, Stan and Sally's Cal 40 Illusion

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Stan And Sally circa 1994


The 55-year-old Honey was cited for his victory in the Jules Verne Trophy as navigator on an otherwise all-French crew aboard Groupama 3. The trimaran set a race record of 48 days, seven hours and 45 minutes and accounted for history’s fastest non-stop circumnavigation under sail, eclipsing the former record by more than 56 hours. Honey is the second American in the history of the award to receive the honor for the fastest circumnavigation of the globe. (Cam Lewis was the first, in 1993, after winning the Jules Verne prize aboard Commodore Explorer, also with a record time.) “It’s a humbling experience to be included on this Rolex Yachtsman of the Year list of legends,” said Honey, who in 2005/06 also was the winning navigator aboard ABN Amro One in the Volvo Ocean Race, “and a tribute to all transoceanic sailors and navigators in our sport. I also think it is a unique characteristic of sailing that we can pursue it throughout our lives and be honored, at age 55, with an award like this.” After graduating from Yale University (New Haven, Conn.) with a degree in Engineering and Applied Science and from Stanford University (Palo Alto, Calif.) with a Masters in Science Electrical Engineering, Honey, in 1998, co-founded Sportvision Inc. which evolved into the leading developer of live-tracking enhancements for sports TV broadcasts. Honey led the development of the yellow first-down line for televised football; the NASCAR racecar tracking and highlighting system; and the baseball K-Zone system, which highlights the pitch location and strike zone in televised baseball. He holds eight patents in navigational system design, 21 patents for TV special effects, is a member of the board of directors of KVH (a manufacturer of satellite communications and navigation sensors), and currently works for the America's Cup Event Authority on TV technology for the America's Cup. Honey is married to Sally Lindsay Honey, a two-time Yachtswoman of the Year (1972, ’73).