PDA

View Full Version : How much do you trust your rigger?



The Flash
01-24-2011, 10:55 AM
Situation - boat was at a local west coast establishment with a decent reputation. In for a bottom job and some rigging, so the stick was pulled. Rig is not your standard, it's a rotating multihull rig with beefy rig tensioners - shroud is 2 piece, with the tensioner and lower section attaching to the upper section of the shroud about 6ft up the deck with Maillon Rapide Pear shaped quick links. Beefy little monsters. To work though - the gates have to be screwed tight.

They weren't. I'm a bit vertically challenged and I didn't "look up" to see if they were - my mistake. Hit a tug wake - heard a bang, about s&*& my britches as both were open, and the only thing holding the rig up was the threads on the quick links had grabbed the eye of the tensioning shroud.

OK - my bad for not inspecting - but I didn't climb the rig to check the attachment up high either. Shouldn't the rigger have given it the once over? Do you assume the riggers do things like put in cotter pins and the like?

What would their liability have been if the rig came down on the simple delivery home?

And it would've been nice if they gave the deck a quick washdown after the work - what a mess. Hell - they could charged me another 30 minutes if they felt the need (and they charged for everything else, so why not)

Single Hander
01-24-2011, 11:22 AM
Sounds like you need a new rigger. Or at lease type out a list of expectations and hand it to them at begging of job.

Tedious, I know, but it really helps with expectations and when job is done you can go down the list and get a response on how thing looked or
went. I do the same with mechanics and it helps sorting matters immensely.

The Flash
01-24-2011, 11:28 AM
Yeah - this was the "house rigger" - I normally have another guy do stuff when she's in her slip. They did an ok job of one small machining item, although it could've been better. I'm now thinking I need to go up top to see if anything is messed up.

But putting the rig back together? Shouldn't need a checklist on that?

MDD
01-24-2011, 12:33 PM
Yep, shame on you for not specifying level of service you assumed would occur and for not checking this critical bit of work. Luckily, you have learned your lesson. This could have been a very expensive and even dangerous lesson to learn. You got out easy!

Old Codger
01-24-2011, 01:15 PM
Writing it all out is the minimum that you need to do on a workorder. Depending on how critical the work done is to your peace of mind... check it yourself.
Even the best rigger or any other trade can get sideswiped in the middle of something and lose track of what he was doing. Ever had a set of winter tires put on and when you walk around you find one wheel with 2 loose lugnuts...... It's all fine to lay the blame where it ought to be placed but it doesn't do a whole lot of good when you are upside down in a ditch.

The Flash
01-24-2011, 01:47 PM
Yep - no doubt - which is why I was kicking myself for not looking. Question is - do you hoist yourself up the rig after work is done - or trust your guy? I'm hearing "get out the chair"

I've had several rigs redone over the years - never had a critical component missed before.

The Flash
01-24-2011, 04:00 PM
Fortunately - the riggers realize they made an oopsie. Looks like I'll have a few extras...



Wow, I am sorry for this, I know what biners you have and will bring them to the boat and install them. Where is the boat? I think we have them in-stock, but if not I will get them overnighted and get them on the boat. thank you for the heads up.

MDD
01-24-2011, 08:08 PM
Glad to hear it worked out for you.

Old Codger
01-25-2011, 07:10 AM
Yep - no doubt - which is why I was kicking myself for not looking. Question is - do you hoist yourself up the rig after work is done - or trust your guy? I'm hearing "get out the chair"

I've had several rigs redone over the years - never had a critical component missed before.


Guess that's something that you'll have to come to terms with. Now that it's happened to you, will you be able to go out without having any doubts or will you need to go take a look to put your own mind at rest. Not necessarily rational, and the probability that that rigger will ever make the same error again is just about nil. Good that the riggers are doing the right thing, makes working with them again easier.

The Flash
01-25-2011, 09:00 AM
Yep - got a call today that not only will they get the replacement 'biners - they don't want me to be inconvenienced so they're crossing the bay to install them, themselves.

Good guys.

BobJ
01-25-2011, 09:08 AM
...Question is - do you hoist yourself up the rig after work is done - or trust your guy? I'm hearing "get out the chair." I've had several rigs redone over the years - never had a critical component missed before.

It depends what you had done - I reinspect everything that was touched. What's the old line - you can delegate authority but not responsibility?

Mad
01-26-2011, 07:32 AM
Writing it all out is the minimum that you need to do on a workorder. Depending on how critical the work done is to your peace of mind... check it yourself.
Even the best rigger or any other trade can get sideswiped in the middle of something and lose track of what he was doing. Ever had a set of winter tires put on and when you walk around you find one wheel with 2 loose lugnuts...... It's all fine to lay the blame where it ought to be placed but it doesn't do a whole lot of good when you are upside down in a ditch.

Sorry, gonna disagree with you on that one. He's there to do a job, no if, no buts and no F**king excuses. No way should you expect to have to climb the rig to make sure the rigger has done his job properly.
The rigger should be sacked or at the very least de-moted to rigging Laser masts, as least he can't F**k that up. (I hope)

Ballard Sailor
01-26-2011, 09:42 AM
First - those Laser masts can be tough to line up....:rolleyes:

Second - you wouldn't have this problem if you hired the guy's from NW rigging...:)

Third - if you hired the guys from NW rigging your boat would be in the San Juans and you could go cruising.....:p

seriously though, you shouldn't have to inspect a professionals work. I hope they are standing behind it and fixing it. Riggers are human and do make mistakes - it's how quickly they find and fix the mistakes that makes them professionals.

The Flash
01-26-2011, 10:20 AM
Yes - they manned up - and sent someone over the boat right quick to take care of it. I was very happy with the response. They were very apologetic and said it was their mistake.

Old Codger
01-26-2011, 08:10 PM
Sorry, gonna disagree with you on that one. He's there to do a job, no if, no buts and no F**king excuses. No way should you expect to have to climb the rig to make sure the rigger has done his job properly.



Not disagreeing with you at all. What should be and what is are sometimes different things. Should you have to check a pro's work? No. Do pro's sometimes screw up... Met the textbook sociopath nutcase from hell small business owner a few years ago that did say one thing that made sense... Inspect what you expect.

Wet Spreaders
02-03-2011, 05:20 AM
Trust, but verify