• Ultime Podium Set, IMOCA's Next In Line




    The Ultime podium is complete. Late last night SVR-Lazartigue took second place ahead of Banque Populaire XI. The leading IMOCAs are due in Martinique on Thursday as the Class 40 make good progress across the Atlantic.

    François Gabart and Tom Laperche crossed the finish line to take second place in the Ultime class aboard SVR-Lazartigue. The French pair were 7 hour 56 minutes and 55 seconds behind the winner Maxi Edmond de Rothschild.

    Gabart and Laperche set out on this double-handed transatlantic race with a brand new boat, their main objective was simply to get to the other side safely, so their second-place finish in 16 days 9 hours 46 minutes and 11 seconds is a huge achievement.




    SVR-Lazartigue, which was built at Gabart’s own manufacturing facility, covered the 7,900 theoretical miles from Le Havre at an average speed of 20.09 knots, but she actually covered 9,333.08 miles at 23.70 knots.

    Speaking on the finish line Gabart said, “It feels like a victory. A few months ago, we didn't even know we would be racing. This morning was crazy, I was crying at the helm, it was so beautiful. There is a great winner up front, but behind us we fought hard. I'm very happy with the boat, it has a huge potential for progress. This may be the last race that Maxi Edmond de Rothschild wins, I hope! They're a step above us today, but it's reasonable to think that we can go after them in the next few races."












    About 55 minutes later came the third placed Ultime, Banque Populaire XI. On board were French ocean racing veterans Armel Le Cléac'h and Kevin Escoffier. The blue and white maxi-trimaran, launched only seven months ago, managed to keep up with the pace set by her rivals throughout the course and finished less than 9 hours behind the winner.

    The pair completed the course in 16 days 10 hours 39 minutes and 20 seconds. They actually covered 9,225.53 miles at an average of 23.38 knots.

    Armel Le Cléac'h said, “We were a little frustrated to have been overtaken by François and Tom for second place. But in the end it was a very positive race. We are very happy with the boat. Our friends on Maxi Edmond de Rothschild were untouchable. We still have a lot to learn about this boat and how to improve it.”


    TRACKER



    Meanwhile the IMOCA fleet is spread across the north-east coast of South America. LinkedOut has won her duel with Apivia and now has a 150 mile advantage and is just 350 miles from the finish.

    Defending title holder Charlie Dalin and Paul Meilhat on Apivia will be anxiously looking back over their stern where Charal is sitting only 55 miles behind in third. The battle for that second spot on the podium is far from over.

    It’s neck and neck for fourth. There’s little to separate Britain’s Sam Davies on Initiatives Coeur from Arkea-Paprec sailed by Sébastien Simon and Yann Elies. USA’s 11th Hour Racing Malama is 7th, part of a large bunch of boats sprinting to the finish that includes Italy's Giancarlo Pedote on Prysmian Group.






    Only 75 miles separate the leading ten boats in the Class 40 fleet. Redman holds her lead 23 miles ahead of defending title holder Ian Lipinski on Credit Mutuel.

    Back in 11th are Britons Brian Thompson and Alistair Richardson who’ve struggled with the boat’s electronics throughout the race. This includes their autopilot, forcing them to steer manually most of the time. As a result they report being exhausted but in good spirits, “We are super pleased with how we are going, especially as our boat is an old design and doesn't have the new scow bow, which most of the leading boats have. We've had to ration food and water because we only had enough for 20 days and it's looking like it will take 22 or 23 days. It's very hot below deck and so we're unable to spend any length of time down there. We're pushing hard and hoping to make up some more places before the finish. We're both in good spirits and enjoying the challenge.”






    All seven Ocean Fifty multihulls have now finished the Transat Jacques Vabre. And we have a winner in the esports version of the race.

    Whilst Primonial may have won the trans-Atlantic race, the Diamond Rock Trophy went to Solidaires en peloton-Arsep co-skippered by Thibaut Vauchel-Camus and Frédéric Duthil.

    The trophy is awarded to the fastest boat on the final stretch of the race. As the race-boats approach Martinique they must pass the famous landmark of Diamond Rock that also marks the start of the timed sprint to the finish line. Solidaires en peloton-Arsep completed the sprint in 43 minutes and 32 seconds. They finished the actual transat race in 4th place.

    Results of Diamond Rock Trophy in Ocean Fifty:

    1. Solidaires en peloton - Arsep (Thibaut Vauchel-Camus - Frédéric Duthil): 43'32

    2. Les P'tits Doudous (Armel Tripon - Benoit Marie) : 54'22

    3. Arkema 4 (Quentin Vlamynck - Lalou Roucayrol) : 1h03'46



    eSailing race winner

    After 17 days we have the first class winner in the Virtual Regatta Transat Jacques Vabre race.

    Thanks to a great comeback from the Doldrums PassTaga-BSP crossed the line as the winner in the Ultime class. Gameuro 974-EZ and rija2 were second and third respectively. The majority of the 300,000 esailing skippers are still at sea and will continue to flock across the finish line over the next few days.

    Winner, PassTaga-BSP has followed an incredible rise to fame; 2nd in the Rolex Fastnet Race, winner of a leg of the Solitaire du Figaro, and now a Transat Jacques Vabre race victory. All this in just one year since taking up the game. What’s the secret to success? “A lot of investment, in terms of time and hours of sleep sacrificed and then the almost constant desire to optimise every element that can be optimised. A pinch of success, and that's it!”
    This article was originally published in forum thread: A New Course For TJV started by Photoboy View original post