• The Home Stretch Ahead

    One race, two diets



    The competitors of Bermuda 1000 Breed Douarnenez - Brest are not all housed in the same sign, this Wednesday. The leading boats, still led by Sébastien Simon (Arkéa - Paprec) prance over 15 knots average, propelled by a flow of north-west blowing between 12 and 14 knots, while latecomers, and in particular those who have not yet crossed the Azores waypoint, battle in very small airs (between 2 and 5 knots) of southern sector. The fleet that is currently spreading 380 miles has not finished stretching. No matter, on every level of the fleet, the fight is raging!

    This Wednesday, the vast majority of the fleet has now overflowed the virtual course mark positioned north of the Azores and is heading directly to Brest, with a crosswind. On this long board, no big strategic options to try, only small gaps to play. Clearly, the time is up to speed and this little game, it is the leader, Sebastien Simon who pulls the best of the game, enjoying a little (if not much) more pressure than his comrades. As proof, the skipper of Arkéa - Paprec flies at nearly 20 knots when the tail of the pack is struggling to advance at 3 knots. "There is not much wind and it's raining. Fortunately, there is a nice swell to push the boat in the right direction commented Miranda Merron (Campaign of France) who tries to compose at best with the erratic little tunes that extend within a radius of about 120 miles around the waypoint of the Azores.


    TRACKER


    A waypoint that only three competitors have not yet crossed this Wednesday, in the middle of the afternoon, namely Air Huusela (Ariel II), Pip Hare (Superbigou) and Denis Van Weynbergh (Eyesea). The latter should unfortunately not pass the mark before ten hours because in addition to the soft on his way, he is no longer able to sail high mainsail since the rupture of his head lashing occurred yesterday. A problem met also by Damien Seguin but that he managed to solve in the morning. "I had never been alone at the top of the mast, not even in Class 40. It takes a lot of firsts! I had a little time at that time but there was still some swell that made the boat move a lot. I was really frustrated and I thought it was too stupid not to be able to leave because we had a nice mano to mano with the other boats since the start of the race. I am happy to return to the match and resume the race, " said the skipper of Groupe APICIL who has solved his concern but who is now galley in the air while the first escape.

    Same thing for Manuel Cousin (Groupe Setin) who also won the small group composed of Clément Giraud (Envol by Fortil), Stéphane Le Diraison (Time for Oceans) and Arnaud Boissières (La Mie Câline), the fault of a little concern for keel. A flask problem prevents him, since this morning, to 100% keel. "I'm going to finish the race by putting the pedal soft, normally it should do it. It's just that I can not stand or really more than in an emergency, " commented Manu Cousin who clings like a heck to finish his race.





    The dice far from being thrown away

    Fabrice Amedeo does not let go of it either. The skipper of Newsrest - Art & Fenêtres, who has a lateral offset of about 50 miles from the rest of the fleet, is currently forced to luff because of his current sail configuration.

    "Without zero code, I had to go a little further north than my competitors. Since daybreak, I eat a little my black bread in weak winds but it was planned. For the future, this north position should allow me to have a better angle to reach. I'm playing my luck doing with my cards! I'm going to shake my ass today and then it will be a race to Brest. I say to myself that I might have small shots to play on my competitors as I have a boat fast enough "said the sailor who intends to take advantage of the strengthening of the wind forecast in the second half of the night but who, meanwhile, takes his patience, well aware that 650 miles from the finish, nothing is played yet, just like Stéphane Le Diraison (Time for Oceans) who has been overtaken in recent hours by Clément Giraud (Envol by Fortil), but who, obviously, did not say his last word. "The buddies in front have more air and those behind do not have any at all ... The low time sometimes reserves its lot of surprising things. Clement, ten miles under my breath, took off while I remained taped. It is not finished ! " Said the sailor.





    An update on ETAs (estimated arrival times)? The first should arrive at the finish line Friday mid-day and the first two-thirds of the fleet should have reached the Marina du Château before Saturday afternoon. It goes without saying that in Brest, all teams of Brest Events Nautiques are already boiling to reserve solitaires the best receptions. Note also that following the departure delay, the organization made the decision to postpone the award ceremony, originally scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, May 19 at 18 hours.

    17 hours clocking : 1. Sébastien Simon (Arkéa - Paprec) 671.5 miles from the finish; 2. Boris Herrmann (Malizia II - Monaco Yacht Club) 18.7 miles from the leader; 3. Sam Davies (Heart Initiatives) at 29.6 m; 4. Yannick Bestaven (Master Rooster IV) at 29.6m; 5. Giancarlo Pedote (Prysmian) at 45.4 m; 6. Maxime Sorel (V and B - Sailing Together) at 46.2 m; 7. Fabrice Amedeo (Newrest - Art and Windows) at 93.8 m; 8. Stéphane The Time for Oceans at 97.5 m; 9. Clement Giraud (Envol by Fortil) at 98 m; 10. Arnaud Boissières (La Mie Câline - Artipôle) at 108.1 m; 11. Damien Seguin (APICIL Group) at 164.2 m; 12. Manuel Cousin (Setin Group) at 164.2 m; 13. Miranda Merron (Campaign of France) at 208 m, 14. Alexia Barrier (4myplanet) at 225.7 m; 15. Ari Huusela (Ariel II) at 271.2 m; 16. Pip Hare (Superbigou) at 291.7 m; 17. Denis Van Weynbergh (Eyesea) at 324.9 m.


    The pen of Erik Orsenna

    Oh, the beautiful race! As jaded children as we are, we need to pull ourselves out of the Netflix series and wake up our dreams! But this race, how to miss it? With a defiant Atlantic in many of his wildest hearts. With legendary tags: from Fastnet to Azores, what need to go farther? And Douarnenez, and Brest: where to find more beautiful, where to find stronger? With boats intimidated because most come out of shipyards and know the sea only infinitely mouliné algorithms. With skippers pawing as the Big Departures approach. With one of these girls' foursomes, if I were you, guys, I'd get ready to drool. A race, like everything in life, must prove itself. We will see in a year, in ten years, if its place is made because the competition is tough. But I know the fairies of Ys Bay well: no one will miss the day of baptism. They are already fighting who will invent the craziest wish.

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    The share of speed
    This Wednesday morning, 14 solitaires have crossed the virtual course mark positioned north of the Azores. All are now heading towards Brest and progressing in the crosswind, propelled by a flow of north-west sector blowing between 10 and 13 knots. For them, no big strategic options to play. Apart from two small counter-edges expected tomorrow in the first part of the night, the fault of a wind refusing is, in the immediate future, clearly the speed that prevails. The deal may be a little different for the laggards, especially those who have not yet overflowed the waypoint, in this case Air Huusela (Ariel II), Pip Hare (Superbigou) and Denis Van Weynbergh (Eyesea) . The latter, who remember, is forced to sail with two reefs in his mainsail since the break of his lashing headrest, should not arrive at this compulsory point of passage before a dozen hours. And for good reason, if the leaders will continue to enjoy good conditions (the six leading boats, which are held in less than 50 miles, currently ride between 13 and 15 knots average), the boats positioned in the back of the Fleet will have to contend with a softening wind that will, as a bonus, move south and away from the direct route in the coming hours. In this context, the gaps may continue to widen, and the rich become richer still. the boats positioned at the rear of the fleet will have to cope with a softening wind that will, as a bonus, move south and away from the direct route in the coming hours. In this context, the gaps may continue to widen, and the rich become richer still. the boats positioned at the rear of the fleet will have to cope with a softening wind that will, as a bonus, move south and away from the direct route in the coming hours. In this context, the gaps may continue to widen, and the rich become richer still.

    Order of passage at the waypoint of the Azores (Paris time):

    Sébastien Simon (Arkéa - Paprec) on May 14 at 2:45 pm
    Yannick Bestaven (Master Rooster) May 14th 4:45 pm
    Sam Davies (Heart Initiatives) May 14th 5pm
    Boris Herrmann (Malizia) on May 14th at 17:30
    Giancarlo Pedote (Prysmian) on May 14th at 17:44
    Maxime Sorel (V and B - Sailing Together) May 14th at 17:45
    Fabrice Amedeo (Newrest - Art & Windows) at 18:45
    Clément Giraud (Envol by Fortil) May 14 at 8:30 pm
    Stéphane The Time for Oceans May 14 at 21:15
    Arnaud Bossières (La Mie Câline) May 14 at 21:45
    Damien Seguin (APICIL Group) on May 15th at 10:45 pm
    Manuel Cousin (Setin Group) May 15 at 1:30
    Miranda Merron (Campaigns of France) May 15 at 5:45
    Alexia Barrier (4myPlanet) May 15th at 7:15 am


    Damien Seguin returns his Grand-Voile and returns to race mode
    Yesterday morning Damien Seguin, then 7th of Bermuda 1000 Race, informed his team ashore that his mainsail had fallen on the deck of his monohull because of the breakage of the system of attachment of the mainsail to the mast (lashing ).

    In a few seconds, the skipper saw his race put in brackets. After careful consideration and study of the weather, Damien decided yesterday to head to La Coruña to make a technical stop with the intention of repairing. A decision very difficult to accept for this fierce competitor since it deprived him of any battle with his competitors. He was then four days away from the Spanish coast.

    But after a few hours of sleep, Damien woke up this morning with the will to try everything to avoid this stop that relegated to the back of the fleet. "I was really frustrated not to be able to leave because we had a nice mano to mano with the other boats since the start of the race. I woke up and told myself that I could not stay like that. I had a coffee and decided, " Damien explains this morning on the phone .

    Damien therefore benefited from milder weather conditions as he struggled with a high-pressure ridge to climb the 27-meter high APICIL Group mast. Helmet on the head, he put on his harness and installed his system developed by mountaineers and specially adapted to his handicap. " It's a hell of an experience. I can not say how long it took me. On the other hand, I took the time to analyze things so as not to make mistakes and once I started, I did not ask any more questions "says the triple Paralympic medalist. The loner finally managed to climb to the top of the mast to recover the halyard (rope) and perform the repair.


    After an epic descent including a fall of five meters fortunately without consequence, the group skipper APICIL found himself on the deck of his boat and was able to return, in a final effort, his big-Sail.

    An incredible feat for this steel-minded sailor who despite several experiences in offshore racing and especially in Class 40, rode for the very first time, alone on the mast. A great first for Damien who is not ready to forget this delicate operation. " You take shots everywhere. Fortunately, I had a helmet. On the other hand, the descent is very difficult to control. I fell five meters before the system crashed. It was a bit hot. I had a little time at that time but there was still some swell that made the boat move a lot. "



    The problem now solved, Damien has resumed his journey, more motivated than ever. He is in pursuit of Arnaud Boissières (La Mie Caline), located 50 miles from his bow. 11th in the race, he still has a little more than 700 miles before reaching Brest, the port of arrival of this Bermuda 1000 Race.


    Damien Seguin on the phone this morning:

    "It's too good. I climbed into the mast this morning. I woke up and told myself that I could not stay like that. I had a coffee and went to get this halyard. It is a sacred experience. I can not say how long it took me but I took the time to analyze things so as not to make mistakes and once I started, I did not go asked questions. Now, I'm in the woods. I am in the process of recovering weather files. I am high GV, I mounted the mainsail. Everything is fine, a priori. I just have to get out of this backbone and recharge my batteries and analyze the weather. Climb the mast, it's okay even if you take shots everywhere. Fortunately, I had a helmet. On the other hand, the descent is very difficult to control. I fell five meters before the system crashed. It was a bit hot.

    I had never been alone at the top of the mast, not even in Class 40. It takes a lot of firsts. I had a little time at that time but there was still some swell that made the boat move a lot. Now I'm going to catch Mie Caline for breakfast. I was really frustrated and I thought it was too stupid not to be able to leave because we had a nice mano to mano with the other boats since the start of the race. I'm happy to return to the match and resume the race. "

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    This article was originally published in forum thread: Bermuda 1000 Underway In Light Conditions started by Photoboy View original post