• Records Crushed in Hong Kong To Vietnam Race


    Orma 60' SHK Scallywag Fuku and Maserati Mod 70 both anielated the 2015 Hong Kong to Vietnam
    record set in 2015 by Syd Fischer's Ragamuffin 100' of 1 Day 18 h 17 m 24 s.
    Scallywag setting the new mark of 1D 6h 9m 22s and was followed closely by Maserati with a time of 1D 7h 47m 53s

    It's worth noting that the race almost did not happen as tensions about who owns what in the South China Sea escalated
    just prior to the races start. Differences of opinion between China, Hong Kong and Vietnam along with on going human rights
    protests in Hong Kong jeopardized the race, it's course and surprisingly the races name, which was changed to the Nha Trang
    Rally at the last moment, one suspects to appease some government officials. Nha Trang is the city in which the race finishes in Vietnam.

    2019 marks the ninth edition of this biennial Race which is the longest Category One offshore race in Asia. The Race was first run in 1996 and then regularly since 2004. The current race record of 42h 17m 24s was set in 2015 by Syd Fischer’s Ragamuffin 100 at an average VMG of 15.8 knots. The challenging, predominantly downwind, 673nm fast passage to Nha Trang, on the south-eastern coast of Vietnam - the race is recognised as a qualifying race for the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race




    Maserati Multi 70 and Giovanni Soldini cross the finish line of the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club Nha Trang Rally

    The Italian Team arrived in Nha Trang with an elapsed time of 1 day, 7 hours, 49 minutes and 12 seconds



    At 21.59 12” on Thursday October 17th local time (14.59 UTC, 16.59 Italian time), Maserati Multi 70 crossed the finish line of the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club Nha Trang Rally (ex Hong Kong to Vietnam Race) off Nha Trang, Vietnam. Giovanni Soldini and his Team completed the race with an elapsed time of 1 day, 7 hours, 49 minutes and 12 seconds.

    Maserati Multi 70’s direct competitor, Orma 60 SHK Scallywag Fuku, skippered by David Witt, crossed the finish line in first place at 20.19 27” local time (13.19 UTC, 15.19 Italian time), winning Multihull Line Honours with an elapsed time of 1 day, 6 hours, 9 minutes and 27 seconds.



    Maserati Multi 70 and SHK Scallywah Fuku set sail from Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong, on Wednesday October 16th at 15.10 local time (7.10 UTC, 9.10 Italian time). Inside the canal they met light upwind conditions and SHK Scallywag Fuku quickly crossed the starting line: the Hong Kong-based Orma 60 is very light and is equipped with a centreboard ideal for those conditions. Outside the canal, the wind became stronger, the Italian trimaran started catching up with its competitor and overtook it at 14 UTC.



    Giovanni Soldini explains: «After passing our competitors, we started to gain a nice advantage. Last night was incredible, the sea was very rough, so we were flying low, but Maserati Multi 70 sails very well and we were able to achieve great speeds, up to 38 knots!»



    Soldini continues: «It was a great and hard-fought race, we though we'd already won. 50 miles from the finish line we were sailing at 25 knots, with 10 miles of advantage over SHK Scallywag Fuku: we could see them on the horizon, under normal conditions it would be impossible to catch up from that distance. Suddenly the sky got cloudy and many downpours started. At first we were able to catch the wind coming from them, but then a huge storm absorbed us, leaving us with no wind at all for two hours. Our competitors were 20 km away from us and were able to reach the finish line undisturbed, while we were fighting between one cloudburst and the other».



    Aboard Maserati Multi 70, skipper Giovanni Soldini raced with a 7-man crew: shift supervisors Guido Broggi and Oliver Herrera Perez; grinders Furio Carboni, Lorenzo Jovanotti Cherubini and Nico Malingri; trimmer and grinder Matteo Soldini; tactician Ronan Cointo.



    TRACKER
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Records Crushed in Hong Kong To Vietnam Race started by Photoboy View original post