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Thread: 2012 Vendee Globe

  1. #111
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    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  2. #112
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    Alex's Arrival

    Alex Thomson, Hugo Boss, third place in the 2012-2013 Vendée Globe





    Alex Thomson crossed the Vendée Globe finish line at 07 hours 25 minutes 43 seconds (GMT) after 80 days 19 hours 23 minutes 43 seconds at sea. He finishes 2 days 18 hours and 7 minutes behind François Gabart.

    His final race time is 80 days 19 hours 25 minutes 43 seconds. His average speed around the course was 12.6 knots and he actually covered 28, 022 miles at the average speed of 14.4 knots. Note: the race’s theoretical distance was 24,393.41 miles.


    all images © www.christophefavreau.com

    After Ellen MacArthur's second place in 2000 and Mike Golding's third in 2005, Alex Thomson becomes the third British skipper ever to finish on the podium of the Vendee Globe. But his time surpasses that of the Golding's previous British solo race record from 2005 by 7 days 19 hours 52 minutes. After winner Francois Gabart and second placed Armel Le Cleac'h, Thomson has also smashed the previous race record of 84 days 03 hours 09 minutes set by Michel Desjoyeaux in 2009.





    Third Time Lucky Thomson’s Third

    The mantra pre start which Alex Thomson never stopped repeating was that his main goal was just to finish this Vendée Globe. By finally completing his first ever non stop circumnavigation in third position, the Hugo Boss skipper broke the run of bad luck that had plagued his two previous Vendée Globe attempts. His podium finish also shows the British skipper is as combative and quick as ever.

    Regatta time

    Despite the fast rhythm the leaders imposed on the race, Alex Thomson showed he could handle speed and transitions. Never far away from the front runners, he definitely led the race of the “older generation” yachts, sailing his Hugo Boss at a sustained high speed.



    One of the signs showing Alex was immediately in full regatta race mode is the claim he filed against some other skippers for not following the official rules of the race regarding the Finisterre Traffic Separation Scheme. Even though the same claim was perfectly justified and filed jointly with the Race Direction, it was met with some misunderstanding. Alex would have to wait to bury his punchy reputation as something of a renegade, but with this result he has been warmly applauded for his great result with a boat, which is not of the latest generation.

    Express repairs
    Alex Thomson’s race has been nothing short of exemplary. Despite technical problems on his Farr-designed yacht, he managed to hang on to the leaders. Right after the Doldrums, the mounting bracket of one of his hydrogenerators came undone and broke the tie bar that keeps the two rudders connected. It was a key moment for the British skipper - who is not exactly renowned for his boat building skills. But he had to fix it fast or run the risk of letting the fleet leaders break away. He turned his autopilot on and, while the boat was progressing at an average speed of 18 knots, he not only set up a composite material workshop on board and proceeded to repair the bracket, but also made a short, informative video report of the repair. And despite this he therefore stayed in contact with the leaders, entering the Indian Ocean 150 miles – less than half a day – behind them.





    A light foot in a lead shoe
    The Indian Ocean turned out to be a rite of passage for Alex, whose reputation had always been the one of a sailor who pushes his boats hard, sometimes too hard and beyond their limits. He showed he had learned to curb his impulsiveness. His smart approach and choices allowed him to never get outdistanced by the frontrunners and stay a few miles behind Gabart, Le Cléac’h, Dick and Stamm. He obviously learned from his previous races and stayed in the race until he finished on the podium.

    Radio silence
    But that did not mean Alex’s troubles were over, as the British sailor had to face hydrogenerator trouble again, forcing him to either repair at all cost or forget about finishing his round-the-world race. The Hugo Boss skipper therefore decided to drastically limit his communication with the outside world, a real sacrifice for a man who is always in need of expressing his feelings and exchanging with his family and friends. He did not give up, though, and after rounding Cape Horn, he finally managed to successfully carry out the necessary repairs. He was still in fourth place and sailed through the Doldrums with his sights set on one thing and one thing only: Coming back on Jean-Pierre Dick, 150 miles ahead of him.

    A noble gesture
    When Jean-Pierre Dick lost his keel on Monday, January 21, he also put Thomson in the spotlight. The Virbac-Paprec 3 skipper was getting prepared to face terrible weather off the Azores when the Hugo Boss skipper spontaneously and sportingly decided to change his heading and stay close to Dick in case the Nice-based sailor found himself in a dangerous situation. Having lost his keel in the South Indian Ocean in 2006 and been rescued by fellow competitor Mike Golding, Thomson fully empathised with the situation and said later there is no way he would have considered leaving Dick to his own devices. By doing so, the British sailor also let go of the hope of sailing around the world in less than 80 days. But by finishing the Vendée Globe on such a noble note, Thomson achieved something even more important than breaking a record: he won a place in the public’s heart and in the race history.

    Race Statistics:
    Longest distance covered in 24 hours: Thomson 477.14 miles (12/12/12)
    545 miles at an average speed of 22.7 knots of François Gabart. (10/12/12)
    Les Sables to Equator: 11 days 02 hours 34 min c/w 11 days 00 hours 20 min
    (Jean Le Cam’s 2004-2005 record: 10 days 11 hours 28 min)
    Equator to Good Hope: 12 days 09 hours 59mn
    (JP Dick’s record: 12 day 02 hour 40min)
    Good Hope to Cape Leeuwin: 18 days 16 hours 23 min c/w 11 days 06 hours 40 min (record)
    Cape Leeuwin to Cape Horn: 8 days 16 hours 23 min c/w 17 days 18 h 35mn (new record)
    Cape Horn to Equator: 14 days 00 hours 17 min
    Equator to Les Sables: 12 days 4 hours 32 min


    http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/

    http://www.alexthomsonracing.com/
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  3. #113
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    January 30 Update



    Vendee Globe Race 2012-2013. Mike Golding onboard Gamesa has been working for the past 24 hours to resolve an issue with his keel. Investigations over the side of the boat with a camera yesterday evening revealed that the front fairing of the keel olive has been lost. With only ten days remaining for this, Golding's fourth Vendée Globe, solo, round the world race, a solution needs to be sought immediately to ensure Golding can reach the finish line in Les Sables d'Olonne, France.

    Gamesa Boat Captain Graham Tourell explains, 'Mike discovered this late yesterday whilst trying to use the bilge pump which empties into the keel box. The pump didn't work and this then led Mike to the keel box which he found was full of water, over the level of the keel head and the rams.

    'There is a lot of turbulence at the front of the keel and without the fairing, water is being driven up into the keel box, faster than the water can drain out by the Venturi system.


    http://<iframe class="restrain" titl...="0"></iframe>

    'Last night Mike used a horseshoe life ring which he cut up and wedged in the front of the keel to stem the flow, which initially worked, but then was popped out by the turbulence. At this point Mike had to rig up the boat hook to brace it in place, which worked for a period of time, but ultimately that came free as well.

    'Even at this late stage of the race, this is possibly a race-ending situation; several of the boat's vital systems are in close proximity to, or directly plumbed into the keel box, which normally has a negative pressure inside it. If the water level and pressure is not reduced, the rubber gaiters which seal the hydraulic ram could burst and the boat could flood, shorting various electrics, or causing other system failures including potentially irretrievable engine damage.

    With the finish line almost in sight, Mike is doing everything he can to find a solution which will ensure he can complete his race. After five hours upside down in the keel box, Mike hopes that he has found an adequate solution.

    An exhausted Golding commented, 'I took advantage of a hole in the wind [light air], to heave-to and get the keel box lid off and pass a section of anchor warp [rope] out of one side of the keel plate and into the other. This actually reduces the cross sectional area of the aperture and thereby, I hope, reduces the pressure inside the keel box and the water level.

    'Having studied the images I took underwater, I was surprised to see that the front fairing plate was missing especially as it was extremely well fitted and protected and so can only assume that this has happened either due to the boat's continual slamming or is the result of a UFO impact in the past 48 hours.'

    While the loss of the fairing will ultimately slow the boat slightly, Golding is hoping that his solution will hold, protecting vital boat systems, and allow him one final opportunity to continue his battle with Jean Le Cam [SynerCiel] for fifth position.

    Mike Golding Vendee Globe Race

    by Emily Caroe







    photo © DI BENEDETTO
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  4. #114
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    Breaking News: Sanso Capsizes, De Lamotte Breaks Rudder




    This Sunday morning 3rd February around 1049hrs UTC two distress beacons of ACCIONA 100% EcoPowered, skippered by Spanish solo sailor Javier Sanso which is racing in the Vendée Globe non stop solo round the world race were triggered. The alarms were received at 1052hrs UTC.

    At 1049hrs UTC the boat was positioned at 31° 59.00 N 27 26.24 W, so 500 miles west of Madeira and 360 miles south of the Azores island of Sao Miguel

    Weather conditions in the area that Sanso was sailing were a NE’ly wind of 15kts. The boat was racing upwind in a moderate trade winds swell. Prior to the incident all was reported to be well on board, only minutes before Sanso had e-mailed a daily report to Race Direction.

    At 1110hrs UTC (1210hrs local time Les Sables d’Olonne, France) Vendée Globe Race Direction were alerted by Ricardo Maldonado, the manager of ACCIONA sailing team, who informed Vendee Globe Race Direction that MRCC Madrid had received the warning that two EPIRB distress beacons (COSPAS/SARSAT) had been activated.

    Immediately Race Direction in Les Sables d’Olonne, the MRCC Ponta Delgada (Azores) and CROSS Griz Nez tried to contact the IMOCA Open 60 ACCIONA but received no reply.

    MRCC Ponta Delgada then requested an aerial reconnaissance of the area by plane. A C295 plane was on zone by 1630hrs UTC. On arrival they found Javier Sanso in his liferaft. Sanso made hand signals and smoke signals (smoke hand flare) next to his capsized boat.

    At 1650hrs UTC this information was confirmed to Race Direction by MRCC Ponta Delgada.

    At 1750hrs UTC an EH101 helicopter was dispatched from the Azores island of Terceira heading to the zone to effect the rescue of Javier Sanso and is expected to be in the area by 2300hrs UTC.


    And below, images of Tanguy De Lamotte's damaged rudder:




    All photos © Tanguy de Lamotte / Initiatives-Coeu





    At 2am UTC, I hit very violently a UFO. My drift port is damaged to the point that I cannot take it out the case. I tried to move it but without any success. For the moment I do not know what to do.

    In addition, my damaged rudder is now broken. So I have a half rudder to starboard and a half drift to port.

    There is also water in the boat. I don’t move at a very high speed at the moment and it allows me to remove quickly the water and protect my electrical equipment. The situation is under control, but it is imperative that I find a solution to remove my drift and then plug the hole.

    I continue my way to Les Sables at the moment and I think even losing a drift I’ll be able to make it. I have resin onboard and I should be able to make the repairs.







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  5. #115

    Update: Sanso Rescued, LPD Finished With No Keel

    4th February 2013

    Lifted off his liferaft by helicopter at 2340hrs UTC last night Javier Sanso, the Spanish skipper of ACCIONA 100% EcoPowered arrived to the Azores island of Terceira at 0330hrs UTC this morning. He was examined by a doctor in the helicopter who did not find any signs of hypothermia and at the military base in Terceira the Spanish sailor was further examined by doctors. At 0430hrs UTC Sanso made a call to Vendée Globe Race Direction to confirm that all is well.

    ************************************************** **********


    Photo © JEAN MARIE LIOT / DPPI/ vendee globe


    4th February 2013

    French skipper Jean-Pierre Dick crossed the finish line off Les Sables d’Olonne this afternoon at 15hrs 5mins and 40 seconds UTC/GMT to finish fourth in the Vendée Globe, the famous solo nonstop around the world race. His third participation has yielded his best ever result, despite having to race the final 2 650 miles without a keel on his IMOCA Open 60 Virbac-Paprec 3. Dick’s elapsed time for course is 86 days, 3 hours, 3 minutes and 40 seconds. He finishes 8d and 47m behind race winner François Gabart (MACIF).


    His average speed for the theoretical course of 24,393 miles is calculated to be 11,8 knots. In reality he sailed 27 734 miles on the water at an actual average speed of 13,4 knots.





    Double winner of the two handed Barcelona World Race and three times winner of the two handed Transat Jacques Vabre Dick was one of the possible favourites to win the Vendée Globe but in the end had to give up his third place position he was holding when his keel snapped off on 21st January. He fought on to the finish after making a 48 hours stop in the north of Spain to let a strong low pressure system pass to receive a warm welcome today back in Les Sables d’Olonne.


    The race of Jean Pierre Dick, fourth place in the 2012-2013 Vendée Globe.
    His finish in Les Sables d’Olonne put a full stop to one of the most engaging stories of this edition Vendée Globe. As he sailed to fourth place Jean-Pierre Dick’s race revealed an inspiring mix of human fortitude and endeavour, sporting excellence and technical achievement.


    JP Dick was on the hunt, lying in third place and still doggedly chasing the two leaders, François Gabart (MACIF) and Armel Le Cléac’h (Banque Populaire) who were nearly 400 miles ahead when his Virbac-Paprec 3 lost its keel at 2245hrs UTC on January 21st some 500 miles NW of the Cape Verde Islands.

    To make the finish Jean-Pierre Dick has sailed some 2650 miles – a record - without the essential appendage which balances the boat against the force of the wind. It was a passage during which he lived life on a knife edge, constantly vigilant to make sure his IMOCA Open 60 was not knocked over. To sit out the worst of a low pressure system over the Bay of Biscay, Dick made a short 48 hours stop on the Galician coast, mooring in Saint Cyprian between 0430hrs UTC January 31st and restarting in light winds on the morning of February 31s at 0720hrs UTC.




    Until the accident effectively robbed him of third place on the podium, the French skipper who is originally from Nice, was one of the key players in the race. On the descent of the Atlantic he was in the top 5 at the Canary Islands. Then, just as he also lead during the 2008-9 Vendée Globe, Dick took the lead and between the Agulhas gate and the Cape of Good Hope he was at the top of the rankings six times, leading the Vendée Globe fleet past the Cape of Good Hope. From there a pattern is set to Cape Leeuwin and beyond with a leading trio becoming well established, François Gabart, Armel Le Cléac'h and the skipper of Virbac-Paprec 3. But in the Pacific Dick lacked the power of key headsails because of damage to the head hook high up on the mast and loses progressively on Gabart and Dick. At one point he is 687 miles behind. But after several mast climbs to fix his problem he comes back strongly on the approach to Cape Horn, more than halving the deficit. On the ascent of the South Atlantic he got to within 100 miles of the leading duo just as their race defining split took place.


    For Dick this fourth place is his best Vendée Globe finish yet. He finished sixth in 2004-5, arriving with no power, and in 2008-9 he had to retire into New Zealand after suffering rudder damage due to a unidentified floating object.


    By comparison with the Breton ‘inner circle’ Dick was a late starter to IMOCA Open 60 racing, and is not really a graduate of their traditional passage through the Figaro solo circuit. Instead he arrived through a win in the crewed Tour de France a Voile race. A qualified vet with a masters business degree and years of a professional executive career under his belt before he turned to ocean racing, JP is a rigorous, thorough sailor who trains long and hard and embraces science and technology in every aspect, human and technical.


    He has become renowned as something of a specialist in two-handed races winning the Transat Jacques Vabre three times now and twice winning the Barcelona World Race around the world. His best solo result remains his third in the 2006 Route du Rhum. Dick has a reputation in the sport for being a tough, hard working gentleman who is supported by highly competent team. He has always made strong technical choices, not least in his choice of yacht designers and building his recent boats in New Zealand which allows him to build miles by delivering them back to France.

    The race of Jean-Pierre Dick: Key points
    - Greatest distance covered in 24 hours: Virbac-Paprec 3 covered the second greatest distance over 24 hours in this edition of the Vendée Globe clocking up 517.23 miles on 10th December. Average speed: 21.6 knots.
    - Speed/ distance covered on the water: 13,4 knots/27 734 miles
    - Number of rankings as leader (5 rankings per day): 6 times
    - Les Sables – Equator: 11d 00hrs 25mins (record held by Jean Le Cam since 2004-2005 race with a time of 10d 11hrs 28mins)
    - Equator – Good Hope: 12d 02hrs 40mins (leading the fleet at that point)
    - Good Hope – Cape Leeuwin: 12 d 13hrs25 mins
    - Cape Leeuwin – Cape Horn: 18d 00hrs 12mins (new record)
    - Cape Horn – Equator: 14d 5h 30mins
    - Equator – Les Sables d’Olonne: 18d 5h 3mins


    Jean-Pierre Dick: Career highlights:
    3rd attempt at the Vendée Globe (6th in 2004-2005, retired in 2008-2009)
    - 2011 - JP elected French Sailor of the Year
    - 2011 Winner of the Transat Jacques Vabre (with Jérémie Beyou)
    - 2010- 2011 Winner of the Barcelona World Race (with Loïck Peyron)
    - 2010 4th in the Route du Rhum
    - 2007-2008 Winner of the Barcelona World Race (with Damian Foxall)
    - 2006 Route du Rhum, 3rd
    - 2005 Winner of the Transat Jacques Vabre (with Loïck Peyron)
    - 2004-2005 Vendée Globe, 6th
    - 2003 Winner of the Transat Jacques Vabre (with Nicolas Abiven)
    - 2001 Winner of the Tour de France Sailing Race


    http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/
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  6. #116
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    See Benard Broach



    "Published on Feb 11, 2013
    This incredible broach happened on Cheminée Poujoulat, skippered by Bernard Stamm, a few days after the start of the Vendée Globe 2012.
    Their was heavy weather. His sailing boat broached while the shipper was behind checking his hydrogenerator.
    The camera was turned on and we have the "live comments" of the single handed skipper. Those Imoca boats are very stiff and do not capsize unless they loose their keels"
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  7. #117
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    Acciona's Watery Rescue



    It's been 9 day since Javier Sanso's Acciona 100% Eco Powered capsized 360 mile south of the Azores.Yesterday, the boat and skipper arrived Punta Delgado to suss out insurance claims and evaluate the damage.





    Following the incident that took place on February 3rd and led to the boat capsizing 360 miles south of the Azores Islands
    just days from finishing the Vendée Globe, Javier Sansó immediately led the operation to rescue his IMOCA 60 after being
    rescued himself by the Portuguese Maritime Rescue Squad.

    On board the tow boat responsible for the operation, the skipper of ACCIONA 100% EcoPowered and a group of technicians and specialist divers were able to right the vessel in a delicate operation - which revealed a broken mast - and bring the boat safely back to land.

    Now in the Azores, a team of ACCIONA 100% EcoPowered engineers and insurance company representatives will begin working to discover the reason and causes behind the accident.


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