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Thread: Maserati Running On Record Pace!

  1. #11

  2. #12
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    Crossing Paths






    The Team on Giovanni Soldini's Volvo 70 " Maserati are mixing it up with the fleet leaders from the Vendee
    Globe off the coast of Brazil.






    16 Days in and Maserati leads Yves Parlier's reference by 1,608 nm.

    http://maserati.soldini.it/?lang=en

    In the Vendee, Francois Gabart on MACIF continues to stretch his lead over Armel le Cleach on Banque Populaire,
    currently 263 nm ahead with just 3,803 nm to go!

    http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/ranking.html






    Fleet News
    After 9 weeks at sea, alone, the fatigue of the race is begin to toll on the mind, body and soul of the skippers. The tiredness can be heard in their voices. The bodies are beginning to fail. Arnaud Bossières (Akena Verandas) is suffering from salt blisters all over his hands and is in a lot of pain. Blisters and salt water are not a great combination and of course, a working pair of hands is an essential piece of kit, when grinding, pulling ropes and being on deck. “I've been regularly putting cream on my hands because they're obviously having a tough time.” Said Arnaud Bossières, today in email report to the race office.

    He’s not alone, Jean Le Cam (SynerCiel) said today on the French version of Vendée Globe LIVE that he broke a rib somewhere around New Zealand. “Things are great, no bacteria problem for me! Physically speaking, I’m fine. Mentally, though, I’m not sure! I may have cracked a rib in the New Zealand area, or at least I got some sort of injury there, and it hasn’t completely healed yet. It’s still painful, especially when I’m lying on my side to sleep.”

    Dr Chauve, the Race Doctor, explained today on the French version of Vendée Globe LIVE that because the skippers have been at sea for two months that they are very tired. There has been a big weather change and the skippers are used to being in a cold environment. Gradually for them temperature is getting warmer and warmer. The skippers will be adapting to a new time difference as well so all these things add up and make it harder for skippers as time goes by.

    There can also be skin problems, because of the air humidity and the waterproof clothing with very tight bands around the wrists, which isn’t good for blood circulation and can lead to development of bacteria.
    “Jean and I talked when he had his rib problem. I just can’t say anything before I can see an X-ray. There’s nothing to do for Jean at sea, he needs to wait. It could be just a bruise.” Said Dr Chauve.“Sometimes, sailors feel down psychologically, and calling friends, family or team members can help in such situations. Sleeping and eating better can help, too, because when you’re tired or hungry, things can look more difficult. Even though the skippers’ bodies are used to sleeping in short cycles.”

    When the skippers return to shore, it takes them weeks to recover and get back to a more regular sleeping pattern. Physically, it can take them months to return to their normal shape. They use their arms muscles a lot during the race, and not their legs, not that much so there arms build up and their legs waste away. The skippers are prepared for this eventuality but still have to deal with the recuperation.
    Alex Thomson (Hugo Boss) today on the English version of Vendée Globe LIVE was delighted to report that he had a 100% charge on his batteries for the first time in weeks. He was able to speak for the first time at length to his family and shorecrew. “I’m good. I’m in good shape. My batteries are 100%, which is a miracle, really. I had a few phone calls last night but it was very difficult to talk to my son Oscar as he is only three years old so he is not a great conversationalist.”

    Today, Jean-Pierre Dick (Virbac Paprec 3) was stealing back the miles at each ranking. Alex Thomson (Hugo Boss) was pragmatic on the English version of Vendée Globe LIVE and explained that once the fleet reached the Doldrums there would be a slow down which would create a compression. The fleet will reach the Azores High and then into the Westerlies. He saw the Westerlies as the opportunity but was tentative to commit. He said, “hopefully the Doldrums won’t be tough but we’ll just have to wait and see.”
    Mike Golding (Gamesa) is continuing to make good progress and still gaining miles on Jean Le Cam (SynerCiel), his main adversary, who this morning was 86 miles ahead. Still tired but working well onboard Mike Golding (Gamesa) said, "Things are OK, it was a pretty busy night but I feel like I have done OK. I was under genoa for a while but now it is kite, I have between 14 and 20kts, the breeze is a bit unstable. Yesterday was spent doing good things, so getting sleep and I had a good meal, but to be honest that is undone a bit now again. It’s been hard work and I’ve burned all that up."

    With Jean Le Cam (SynerCiel), slowed ahead by the ridge of high pressure which was more or less blocking his way, Mike has profited by 50 miles in the past 36 hours, finding a lane of wind. "It is OK, I am still making good progress and have carried on making miles on Jean. He has slammed into the light stuff a bit. I have pushed to the right and found a corridor of breeze, but to be honest he is not going that badly now either. It is gentle downwind sailing, on starboard for the next couple of days, then reaching. I am sailing my own race. If I follow Jean I just end up with what he’s got. I am looking for my own path and doing my own thing."

    Bertrand De Broc (Votre Nom Autour du Monde avec EDM) is expected to round Cape Horn tomorrow.


    1 - François Gabart
    [ MACIF ]
    at 3883.2 miles from the finish

    2 - Armel Le Cléac'h
    [ Banque Populaire ]
    at 249 milles from leader

    3 - Jean Pierre Dick
    [ Virbac-Paprec 3 ]
    at 645.0 milles from leader

    4 - Alex Thomson
    [ Hugo Boss ]
    at 735.9 milles from leader

    5 - Jean Le Cam
    [ SynerCiel ]
    at 1730.8 milles from leader


    Things are great, no bacteria problem for me! Physically speaking, I’m fine. Mentally, though, I’m not sure! (he laughs) I may have cracked a rib in the New Zealand area, or at least I got some sort of injury there, and it hasn’t completely healed yet. It’s still painful, especially when I’m lying on my side to sleep. The temperature is just perfect right now, not too cold, not too hot. I’m wearing a t-shirt and I may need a fleece jacket if I go outside, because of the wind. I’m north of the roaring forties now. I don’t listen to music, and people keep telling me it’s strange, that I should listen to music more. But my speakers aren’t too good, so the quality wouldn’t be good enough for me. And I don’t like headphones, I can’t stand them. I’ll try and tell you whether I managed to listen to good music. Having a heating system on board isn’t even about comfort, it’s just a basic need when you’re in the Southern Ocean and it’s so cold and humid. You know, I have diesel on board and hydrogenerators, so I can use energy, especially since my hydrogenerators have been working so well. Why would I live in the dark when I can easily turn on the light?

    Jean le Cam (FRA, SynerCiel)


    It’s all good here, it’s been a nice day, I’m getting closer to Cape Horn. Every time somebody goes to the Initiatives-coeur website, my sponsor gives one euro to the Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque charity, making it possible for sick children to have heart surgery. So we need more and more people to click and save these children’s lives! Cape Horn is both close and far away. My position is better than Bertrand’s, I’ll have a more direct route to the Horn while he’ll have to gybe a couple of times. Maybe I can catch up with him, or at least get much closer to him. I’m going as fast as I can.

    Tanguy de Lamotte (FRA, Initiatives-coeur)



    I’m doing good in terms of health and physically. I’m tired, of course, I’ve used a lot of mental energy, I’m not as reactive as I was at the start. I hit a lot of things on board, I have bruises, but I didn’t get injured, and apparently, neither did the other skippers. It’s almost a surprise because we get shaken a lot, but I guess we’ve all been careful. There are some skin problems, though, my feet are in a very bad shape because they’ve been in boots for weeks. Hands and skins do get damaged during such a race, it’s a fact, but Doctor Chauve gave us the best creams to help us deal with that. Alex is not having great wind, so I guess I’ll be able to go faster than him. Armel is sailing faster than me, though, so I need to put an end to that situation. I think we’ll be able to catch up a bit in the near future. Right now the gaps are quite big.

    Jean-Pierre Dick (FRA, Virbac Paprec 3)
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  3. #13
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    Maserati Nears Cape Horn!





    Nearly 21 days have passed since their departure from New York (which took place December 31, 2012 passing the Statue of Liberty at 16h 22 ’56” and Ambrose Light at 17h 49′ 30”), and Maserati are more than 6,700 miles into their voyage. The VOR70 is now grappling with one of the most delicate step of the historical Golden Route: the passage of the legendary Cape Horn against the prevailing winds and currents. Cape Horn is the most southerly extremity of Argentina situated at the latitude of the “Furious Fifties” the notorious meeting place of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

    Giovanni Soldini and his team are currently sailing towards the Strait of Le Maire at a speed of 14 knots with winds from east. They are only 160 miles away from Cape Horn. The passage of the Horn is expected tomorrow early in the morning. The team is expecting difficult conditions due to the arrival of a front bringing about 30 knots of wind from the west with gusts up to 40 knots. They are also expecting the presence of several icebergs between the Strait of Le Maire and Cape Horn.








    “On board everything is fine. We are ready to face the passage of Cape Horn against the wind,” says Soldini speaking on the phone at about 14.30 today. “We’re heading towards the Strait of Le Maire and we decided to pass directly through it in order to run less miles and position ourselves as far to the west possible. The passage of the strait will be very challenging due to the 4-5 knots of counter-currents and the presence of giant seaweed that could tangle up the keel. They can be up to 20 meters long and 20 centimeters wide; we have to be very careful. All day tomorrow we will have a strong westerly wind, with gusts up to 40 knots. We also know that there are 7 or 8 icebergs between Le Maire and Cape Horn, so we will sail very close to the coast with our radar switched on. Our strategy will be to exploit the slightest change in the wind direction in order to head quickly towards the west and then north, parallel to the Chile coast. At the same time we must not get too close because the Andes are so high they form a wall that compresses the isobars causing the wind to increase by up to 15 knots. We are doing our best, the ocean will decide when it will let us go”.




    The record New York-San Francisco is monitored by the World Sailing Speed Record Council (WSSRC), the international body that certifies the best time results of sailing boats on the historic Clipper routes. Two categories of boats have attempted this record: monohulls and multihulls. The current record for monohulls (Maserati‘s category) is held by Frenchman Yves Parlier and was set in 1998 aboard the 60 ft Aquitaine Innovations. His record time stands at 57 days, 3 hours, 2 minutes. The record for multihulls was established in 2008 by Lionel Lemonchois aboard the 110ft maxi-catamaran, Gitana 13 (43 days, 3 minutes, 38 seconds, at an average speed of 13.5 knots). Gitana 13 rounded Cape Horn after 22 days, 7 hours and 25 minutes.





    http://maserati.soldini.it/?lang=en
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  4. #14
    Looks like they are at the horn right now!

  5. #15
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    Maserati Flying Up The Chilean Coast




    The only words I have to describe the time since passing the horn are: Cold, Frigid, bone chilling, etc. I think you get the picture.

    When you decide to take on the Golden route, it is not all sun and fun. You make the commitment to going upwind in the Southern Ocean in 20 knots of breeze, and reaching in 6 degree water at 20 knots, with plenty on the deck.

    This is how we have spent our last 2 days, trying to get up the coast away from the Horn, the Southern Ocean lows, and the cold water. We have done 475 miles as the crow flies since the rounding, and certainly over 500 in reality, as we passed south of Diego Ramierez island.

    Thankfully the upwind with storm jib ans 2 reefs is finished, we moved from that to full main j4, and are now onto the FRO Full Main and J4 combination, with the wind aft of the beam, headed Northwest.

    We have breeze still for another 18 hours or so, then another day of upwind before we get free of all this and can begin to go downwind again. The trades look fairly light, but it should be warm, and memories of the south will quickly fade.

    The outlook long term is good; 15 days from now we should still be within 100 miles of the Gitana 13 record, with 2200 miles to go.

    From a cold wet FAST Maserati, hope everyone is tucked in well with a nice cup of tea.

    Ryan





    Maserati is sailing 18 knots fast along the Chilean coast
    Good weather conditions for Giovanni Soldini and his team (but it’s freezing cold)

    After rounding Cape Horn, the “Everest of the seas”, the most southerly point of South America, Giovanni Soldini and Maserati‘s team have started sailing back up in the Pacific Ocean along the Chilean coast, following a route that is parallel to the continental rise.



    At the 1 pm update they are sailing at 18 knots with 20 knots of wind abeam. The weather forecast for the next hours is good.

    “Everything is going really well and we are in very high spirits – says Soldini on the satellite phone – in the last hours a cold front has passed over us. The night was tough because of the unstable winds and the storms. But right now we are sailing windward in excellent weather conditions. In the last 20 days we have worked hard to dry up the interior of Maserati, closing all of the waterways. But outside the biting cold is a big problem, mostly at night. The water is 7 degrees, and I prefer not to know what the air temperature is at night…”




    Giovanni Soldini and his crew of eight left New York on December 31, 2012 to challenge the historical Golden Route record, 13.225 miles from New York to San Francisco. They reached the equator in 9 days and 45 minutes and rounded Cape Horn after 21 days, 23 hours and 14 minutes. It is a record time non only compared to Yves Parlier’s Aquitaine Innovations (who holds the record in the monohull category – Maserati’s one – with a time of 57 days and 3 hours) but also compared to Gitana 13, Lionel Lemonchois’ maxi catamaran, that in 2008 took 8 hours more to leave the Atlantic Ocean behind. Gitana 13 holds the record in the multihull category with a time of 43 days and 3 minutes.

    Maserati is 6.160 miles from San Francisco.




    At http://maserati.soldini.it you can follow Giovanni Soldini and his team’s navigation from New York to San Francisco almost live, 24 hours a day: videos and photos sent from aboard, news and comments form the crew members. At Cartography page, the position of Maserati is updated every hour to experience the challenge of Soldini and his team surfing from home.

    CAPE HORN
    The discovery of Cape Horn goes back to the Seventeenth century when a wealthy Dutch merchant named Isacc Le Maire decided to finance an expedition to India. His aim: to find an alternative passage to the Strait of Magellan. At the time the strait was under the control of the Dutch East India Company which had a monopoly of all trade to and from the Asian continent. With this goal Isacc hired his son Jakob Le Maire and Willem Cornelisz Schouten of Horn, a veteran Dutch captain famous for his skill and experience at sea.

    The expedition departed on 14 June 1615 from Texel (Netherlands) with two vessels (the Unity – 360 tons with 65 men – and the Horn – 110 tons with 22men). The boats reached the coast of South America in December 1615, after 6 months at sea. Schouten led his crew off the coast of Tierra del Fuego, across the Strait of Le Maire at Isla de los Estados’ latitude, until the sighting of the island of Cape Horn. According to Schouten’s diary, Cape Horn was rounded on January 29, 1616 and named by Schouten himself in honor of his hometown (Hoorn – Netherlands).

    http://maserati.soldini.it/?lang=en
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  6. #16
    The'ye loocke coulde. I hoape the boise on maserety breacke teh recourde. Goe teh Masterety!

  7. #17
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    Maserati Update Feb 3, 2012




    Giovanni’s logbook:
    “We’ve stacked up 10.000 miles towards San Francisco. Actually, we ran many more miles but these are the good ones toward our goal. The trade wind is becoming increasingly weak and unstable. As consequence, we have to change the spi quite often: under 13 knots we use a flatter sail and over 13 knots we use an asymmetric spi. We are at 10° South and we keep going towards the Equator hoping that Aeolus will be benevolent this time too.




    I’ve found out that one of the main differences between sailing with a crew or sailing alone is music. When you are a solo sailor hearing is one of the most important senses and the sounds of the boat are the voice you need to decode. Through hearing you can perfectly control everything happens: the boat warns if you have to haul a sail or pull a rope.




    Sometimes she also warns you if there is a piece that is breaking or a tank of water that has to be fastened. Basically, through the sounds you create a sort of relationship with the boat that allows you to keep everything under control. Listening to the music with the headphones is the same as having an eye patch.




    Aboard Maserati, with a 9 people crew, I’ve found out that it is beautiful to be at the helm listening to the music. It is almost a mystical experience to feel the boat surfing the waves with a background song… of course in the meantime there has always to be someone else who is listening to the boat and her noises




    http://maserati.soldini.it/?lang=en
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  8. #18
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    Maserati Due In Next Week






    After sailing non-stop for 38 days, Maserati is in the extreme north of the Pacific Ocean, in the notorious "pot au noir": managing the boat is very demanding because of the doldrums, the light and unstable winds and the violent storms. Giovanni Soldini and his team have still to face 120 miles in these tough conditions, then they will finally reach the North Pacific trade winds that will take them in front of San Francisco. There are 1900 miles to go for San Francisco and the estimated arrival time is between February 15 and 17.










    "We have repaired the hole in the mast, Guido Broggi made a great job with the lamination. – says Soldini – About a hundred miles with tough weather conditions still stretch in front of us. Then, when we reach 8° N, we will deal with the high pressure area in front of the US coast. Maserati will have to sail close-hauled and enter the high pressure area to find a wind which turns from North and that will allow us to tack and sail on port tack to the finish line".





    Giovanni Soldini and his crew of eight sailors left New York on December 31, 2012 attempting to break the record of the historic Golden Route, 13.225 miles from New York to San Francisco. The time reference is set by Yves Parlier aboard Aquitaine Innovations (57 days and 3 hours, monohull category).





    http://maserati.soldini.it/?lang=en
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  9. #19

    Meet and Greet Maserati !! Heading out the gate to follow them in ?

    Hey,

    Who is going to greet these guys ?

    Bring your old flares, let USCG know your launching fire works ! Looks like Friday.

  10. #20
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    Working on deets...you taking the snacktician out?
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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