Page 16 of 33 FirstFirst ... 6141516171826 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 322

Thread: 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race

  1. #151

  2. #152
    Cargados archipelago apparently does not show up readily on the electronic charts according to some of the onboard
    blogs. I'll bet there are many of those along the route. Hard to miss what you cant see.

  3. #153
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,439
    Blog Entries
    1



    November 30, 2014 – Team Alvimedica has resumed racing today toward Abu Dhabi, after diverting yesterday afternoon to stand by until early morning today to assist in the rescue of fellow Volvo Ocean Race competitor Team Vestas Wind after they ran aground off Mauritius in the Indian Ocean.



    Team Alvimedica, who remained nearby (within 4,500 meters) in visual and radio contact with Team Vestas Wind and local Coast Guard officials until the rescue was safely completed, was not required to assist in the actual evacuation of the crew to shore.



    The Vestas crew, who were not injured in the grounding, first abandoned the Volvo Ocean 65 to two life rafts before being rescued by a local coast guard center console boat for transfer safely to shore on Ile de Sud, part of the Carados Carajos Shoals northeast of Mauritius.



    Shortly after Team Alvimedica had returned to racing this morning, skipper Charlie Enright reflected on the dramatic chain of events. “Last night we acted as a relay between the Coast Guard and Team Vestas Wind. We stood by and logged the events as they transpired. We also acted as a go-between because often times the Coast Guard and Vestas had trouble directly communicating due to range issues and the fact that Vestas was on a hand-held VHF. They boarded their own life rafts and anchored them to a rock before they were picked up this morning,” Enright reported.


    Team Alvimedica was prepared to welcome the nine team members from Vestas on board their racing yacht in the morning once they were rescued form the reef. “Originally, when Nico (Vestas skipper Chris Nicholson) didn’t have any information, he was going to board our boat to re-group. We even made them a meal. But after talking to the locals, they discovered that there’s a supply boat coming tomorrow (to Ile du Sud) and that they had food and accommodation for the night so they released us to continue sailing.”


    Enright says it was a surreal night but not until the morning did the enormity of it sink in. “I can only imagine what it must have been like for Vestas to hit that reef – from sailing to a dead stop, losing your rudders, taking on water, abandoning your ship, wading across said reef in knee-high waters, while towing your two life rafts behind you…wow. None of it really sets in until you see the boat on the bricks at day break.”



    For Team Alvimedica, their only concern throughout the ordeal was the safety of their fellow competitors. “The only thing that matters, was that everyone was ok, they are our competitors and our friends but in addition to that we are each other’s support networks when we are sailing in remote corners of the world,” Enright said.



    Team Alvimedica now returns to race mode as they set their sights once again on the Leg Two finish line in Abu Dhabi. “It’s hard to switch gears, but once we were assured of the safety of the Vestas crew, it was time to continue on to Abu Dhabi. Although racing was secondary last night, it has once again become our primary focus.”



    Enright gave his crew high marks for the way they handled the situation. “I am proud of how our crew conducted themselves during our assistance of Vestas. Will Oxley (navigator), who’s been through his fair share of marine mishaps, helped run the procedures and communications and did an excellent job.”
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  4. #154
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,439
    Blog Entries
    1

    Campbell Field Weighs In

    VOR 30/11 - a sad event for yacht racing
    Since VEST grounding yesterday there has been a huge amount of speculation and opinion as to how this happened, or who is to blame.

    Don't know 100% about other software packages...Expedition routing can route freely (i.e. with no obstacles) or can be constrained by charts, or your own marks, or your own prohibited zones. Plenty of optimal route outputs run where you would have to put the wheels down. Ultimately it is the user who defines how the routing output is run and results used.

    The point I'm putting forward here is that software does not make someone a navigator. First you must be a navigator and then know and understand the strengths and limitations of the tools you have.

    When this is explained to a lot of people I meet, it is usually met with confused stares. The number of software jockeys (promoting themselves navigators) in yacht racing I have come across who expect the answers to fall out of their computer is astounding. Take the deck screen away from them and they couldn't get out of the marina or find the top mark efficiently if their life depended on it.

    Wouter is a navigator, one of the best, and firmly falls into the category of a superb yachtsman and navigator. One who understands the strengths and limitations of digital tools more than most will ever do. And one of the nicest guys in the sport to boot.

    Mistakes happen. Just glad they are all safe and uninjured.

    There but for the grace of god go I...
    http://www.fieldyachting.com/2014/11...ht-racing.html
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  5. #155
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,439
    Blog Entries
    1


    Special edition of the The Inside Track, Knut Frostad explains the situation with Team Vestas Wind running aground & other race teams give their reactions to the news.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  6. #156
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,439
    Blog Entries
    1

    Nicholson: My pride in my ‘ship wrecked’ crew

    ALICANTE, Spain, November 30 – Australian skipper, Chris Nicholson, spoke on Sunday night of his immense pride at the way his Team Vestas Wind crew came through the ordeal of being grounded and being forced to abandon their boat in complete darkness on a remote Indian Ocean reef.

    Nicholson, 45, said he had to make 'the number one toughest decision of my life' to leave the stricken Volvo Ocean 65 in the small hours of the morning after it was effectively beached on the reef on an archipelago of islands called St. Brandon, 430 north-east kilometres from Mauritius.

    He was interviewed by volvooceanrace.com on Sunday night as he surveyed the idyllic, but remote, island of Íle du Sud, where he was transported with the rest of his crew to safety as day broke following a night of drama.

    “It’s the most beautiful night I’ve ever seen,” he said. “And last night was one of the worst nights that I have ever seen.”




    Nicholson, from Lake Macquarie, New South Wales, continued: “We’re kind of literally shipwrecked It’s a unique experience going through it.”

    He told how the boat had run into the reef at around 19 knots and yet astonishingly, none of the nine on board suffered even minor injuries.

    Nicholson was also amazed that the boat survived the impact without breaking up immediately.

    He said his plan had been to keep the crew on board until daybreak, before being rescued, but had practised a drill for abandoning the boat 15-20 times, ‘never with the intention of having to do it', he explained.

    However, the ‘massive pounding’ of the waves eventually told and Nicholson decided he had no option but to abandon ship, the most dreaded words a skipper can utter.





    He and his crew then waded across the reef in knee-deep water in their boots before finding a mercifully dry spot where they waited for a coastguard RIB to take them to Íle du Sud and safety.

    Nicholson, who at times struggled with his emotions during the 20-minute long interview, said the spirit of his crew after such a blow had stunned him. “I always believed that we were a strong team.

    “We made a mistake, which led to what happened last night, but I’ve been blown away by the way the guys dealt with the situation, trying to make things as right as possible today. They make me so proud.”

    He now plans to meet up with shore crew chief Neil Cox (AUS) and assess the chances of salvaging the boat. “We have a pretty unique group of people to get as good an outcome as possible,” he said.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  7. #157
    The boats are technically rentals, aren't they?

    Can they get a replacement?

  8. #158
    Doubtful, they are done, as is the navigator if he missed the reef on the charts.

  9. #159
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,439
    Blog Entries
    1


    December 01, 2014 – Competitors in the Volvo Ocean Race share an ethos with members of the military: Leave no man behind. That ethos carries significant weight when you’re on the ocean in a remote part of the world, far from assistance.




    At that point your nearest help is usually a competitor. That ethos led to Team Alvimedica’s direct assistance over the past weekend in the safe recovery of the Team Vestas Wind crew from a shoal in a remote part of the Indian Ocean. The youngest crew in the race was stationed on site for some 8 hours.

    It was 10 minutes before 1600 UTC on Saturday evening when Team Alvimedica navigator Will Oxley received a call from Volvo Ocean Race headquarters saying that Team Vestas Wind had run aground on the Cargados Carajos Shoals, some 230 nautical miles northeast of Mauritius. The rudders of the Volvo Ocean 65 had been torn off and there was water ingress in the stern compartments, although the compartments were still water tight from the main part of the hull.

    The shoals had been of concern to Oxley and skipper Charlie Enright for a few days as the crew approached from the south. Very low on the water the shoals would be extremely difficult to see at night, which is when Team Vestas went aground.


    “Basically it’s a coral reef flat,” said Oxley. “At high tide there was probably 1-1.5 meters of water over the flat. So we could see the yacht clear as day in the morning leaning over at a terrible angle with large breaking waves to weather. We could see their life rafts tethered to a rock.”

    That was in the light of day. During the night, when Team Alvimedica arrived on site and took up station on the western side of the flat downwind from Team Vestas, no one knew what to expect. But Enright, competing in his first Volvo Ocean Race, had that ethos in mind. They were positioned to intercept the life raft if the Team Vestas crew had to go adrift.

    “Racing has become secondary based on the communications we’ve had with Vestas,” said Enright, at 30 years old the youngest skipper in the race. “We’ll rejoin the race at a time when that’s acceptable and the priority once again.”

    That point came yesterday morning, when local coast guard authorities safely recovered the nine members of the Team Vestas Wind crew. It brought to close a night filled with anxiety for both crews. As Enright noted before Team Vestas abandoned ship, “I think their situation deteriorates with every wave.”

    The problem was Team Vestas Wind’s position on the reef. It was being blown onto the reef. “We were party every 30 minutes to the slow destruction of the yacht,” said Oxley. “It was terrible to hear what was happening.”

    Once on site Team Alvimedica played an important role in communications. Oxley and Enright were in contact every 30 minutes with Team Vestas skipper Chris “Nico” Nicholson or navigator Wouter Verbaak, both race veterans. They were also in regular contact with the local coast guard authorities, acting as a go-between because Team Vestas was reduced to a hand-held VHF for communication. Oxley and Enright also kept the race office informed.

    It was in the cover of darkness when Nicholson made the call to abandon ship due to the water ingress. There is no such thing as stepping into a life raft, but in this case the crew didn’t have to go swimming either. Instead the crew waded in knee-deep water across the reef flat to a point where they could board the raft, which was tied to a rock, and wait until dawn.

    Illuminated through the night by strobe light, the life raft was clearly visible when the coast guard authorities arrived at day break. They transported the Team Vestas crew to the tiny islet of Íle du Sud, which is also known as St. Brandon and part of Cargados Carajos Shoals.

    In thanking the race organization for its diligence in the rescue operation, Vestas chief marketing officer Morten Albaek commended Team Alvimedica. “We also thank our colleagues on the Alvimedica race team for their support and outstanding professionalism during the rescue operations,” said Albaek.

    Although the Team Vestas crew was safely rescued, Team Alvimedica’s participation came to an abrupt end. Not knowing what to expect, the crew was prepared to offer any assistance necessary.

    “They were incredibly appreciative of the role we played,” said Oxley. “But they didn’t want to disrupt our lives anymore so they sent us on our way. To us, we would’ve in many ways liked to see them to have closure. But I understand completely the place their in. Once they were safe and everything was ok, they then wanted us to continue our race.”

    “For those guys, it has to be absolutely heartbreaking,” said Dave Swete. “We’re just relieved that everyone’s ok.”

    With that drama passed, Team Alvimedica presses on regardless.

    “Now we must shift back into racing mode,” Oxley continued. “It has been such an up and down leg so far and we still have 3,000 nautical miles of light wind sailing ahead. As we readjust and catch up on some sleep and get our heads back in the game I firmly believe that, given the forecast, there is a real chance of catching at least one of the yachts ahead of us so this is now our challenge!”
    For more information, visit http://www.teamalvimedica.com/news/
    —Sean McNeill

    http://www.teamalvimedica.com/news/t...n-left-behind/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  10. #160
    I wonder if Wouter Verbraak's credit card for online purchases was denied and they were just winging it?

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •