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Thread: Cup Dirt

  1. #551

  2. #552
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    " There Is No Second Comeback



    Congratulations to Peter Burling and crew or ETNZ for winning the 35th America's Cup!!!
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  3. #553
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron accepts the challenge of Circolo della Vela Sicilia, which becomes the Challenger of Record for the XXXVI America's Cup.

    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is pleased to announce that it has accepted a challenge from Circolo della Vela Sicilia which was received immediately upon the victory of Emirates Team New Zealand in the last race of the 35th America's Cup.

    As the first challenger, CVS will be the Challenger of Record for the 36th America's Cup and its representative team will be Luna Rossa Challenge.

    The 36th America’s Cup will be open to further challengers from any organized Yacht Club of a foreign country under conditions to be announced in due course.

    RNZYS and its representative team, Emirates Team New Zealand, look forward to working with CVS and Luna Rossa Challenge to create an exciting future for the event by combining innovation with the traditional sporting values of the America’s Cup.

    By the Commodores.

    Steve Mair.
    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.

    Agostino Randazzo Randazzo.
    Circolo della Vela Sicilia.
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  4. #554
    Luna Rossa?

    Back to the future?

  5. #555
    They are going to shift to full foiling cruising cats with emphasis on style over speed.

  6. #556
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Spackler View Post
    They are going to shift to full foiling cruising cats with emphasis on style over speed.
    My understanding is scoring will also be based on how many youtube hits and patreon donations each team is able to score. This is usually directly related to the number of scantily clad women in the videos so this should be great for tv ratings.

  7. #557
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    American Windsurfer/Kiteboarder/Drone Pilot Key To ETNZ's Success




    Written by Frank Bures for New York Times



    Nick Bowers heard his phone ring at 5 one morning in September 2015. He struggled out of bed and answered. On the line was a boat maker from Holland with an urgent request: Could he be in Italy that night to shoot video of the A-Class World Catamaran Championships?

    Bowers, who lived in Lake Geneva, Wis., where he ran a small video production company, packed his drones and hurried to the airport in Chicago.

    Word of Bowers’s dramatic sailing footage had been spreading through the sailing world. It was gorgeous and mesmerizing.

    Bailey White, president of the United States A-Class Sailing Association, who recruited Bowers for the race in Italy, remembers his first impression. “I had never seen anyone be able to shoot the angles he was shooting,” White said. “While the boat was up in the air foiling, he was getting so low flying this drone that he was actually below the boat, so you got a sense for exactly how the boat was performing and how the sailors were doing.”

    Bowers, whose work would earn him a spot with one of the two teams currently racing in the finals of the 2017 America’s Cup, came on this style almost accidentally. At first, he started filming without a monitor because he couldn’t afford one. He learned to work by watching the drone instead of watching the video feed. But he quickly found this gave him both better control and better footage.


    This way he could film a foot off the water, just a few feet from the boat. If something went wrong, he could get the drone out of the way in time without the delay and distortion of a screen. He used the screen on the flight controller only for “rig shots” directly overhead.





    Nat Shaver is a foil designer who worked for Groupama Team France before it was knocked out of the Cup. He first met Bowers at a race in Oregon, and Shaver immediately appreciated the drone’s potential in the sport’s technological arms race, which has seen speeds go from around 12 knots (about 14 miles per hour) in 2007 to 26 knots (30 m.p.h.) in 2010 to 47 knots (54) in 2013.

    The new speeds have been a problem for drone pilots, including Bowers. In 2015, he was using one of Dà-Jiāng Innovations’ Phantom models, which worked well most of the time, but he couldn’t keep up with the new racing boats. “I wanted to film one of these America’s Cup boats sailing upwind, but nothing commercially available could do that,” he said.


    This way he could film a foot off the water, just a few feet from the boat. If something went wrong, he could get the drone out of the way in time without the delay and distortion of a screen. He used the screen on the flight controller only for “rig shots” directly overhead.






    Nat Shaver is a foil designer who worked for Groupama Team France before it was knocked out of the Cup. He first met Bowers at a race in Oregon, and Shaver immediately appreciated the drone’s potential in the sport’s technological arms race, which has seen speeds go from around 12 knots (about 14 miles per hour) in 2007 to 26 knots (30 m.p.h.) in 2010 to 47 knots (54) in 2013.

    The new speeds have been a problem for drone pilots, including Bowers. In 2015, he was using one of Dà-Jiāng Innovations’ Phantom models, which worked well most of the time, but he couldn’t keep up with the new racing boats. “I wanted to film one of these America’s Cup boats sailing upwind, but nothing commercially available could do that,” he said.


    One way Bowers got it was by relying on his eyes instead of the monitor. Another was by replacing the factory issue wide-angle lens with one that was rectilinear (similar to a 35 millimeter camera) for cleaner, more professional footage. “Basically,” Bowers said, “I wanted to trick people into thinking I was flying a big camera.”

    The new skipper for Team New Zealand, Glenn Ashby, was impressed by Bowers’s work. He offered him a position running the team’s visual data program, including all the cameras on the boat, plus drones.

    The team is known for its innovation, like being the first to put an America’s Cup boat on hydrofoils, and was desperate for some kind of advantage. It had nearly gone under when qualifying rounds were moved from Auckland to Bermuda in 2015, causing the team to lose government funding, sponsors and nearly all hope of winning, let alone surviving.

    By late 2015, the Kiwis were busy working on a radical new boat design. On their new craft, every button, every rudder, every foil, every piece of rigging was wired with fiber-optic strings and sensors. These measured the strain and calculated the power output of the stationary bikes that had replaced the old hand grinders, which generate the power to move the sails. The boat, like all the boats in the Cup, was more like a floating brain, feeding back every piece of data that it could gather.


    Bowers, his wife and their 2-year-old daughter moved to Auckland to help the team train. Every day he sailed in the chase boat behind the team for several hours as they tested new, aggressive moves. Back on shore, he would spend hours syncing his videos with the boat’s telemetric data. When that was finished, he would head to his own work space, where he was building a new, bigger drone, twice the size of his previous model, which could go from 0 to 60 m.p.h. in one second.

    In February, the team revealed its new boat design. In April, training wound down and the boat was flown to Bermuda. Then, just before the Louis Vuitton Cup qualifying rounds started in May, Oracle also added a stationary bike to its boat.

    As the qualifiers progressed, New Zealand and Oracle fought for the top spot, which Oracle won. In a small compensation, New Zealand achieved the holy grail of sailing by staying on its foils, its hulls out of the water, 100 percent of the time in a race against France. Then, four days later in the semifinals, its boat capsized and was damaged in violent winds.

    But the Kiwis prevailed and then defeated Artemis Racing of Sweden to emerge as the challenger for a rematch with Oracle Team USA in the final in Bermuda’s Great Sound. Team New Zealand has a commanding 3-0 lead on Oracle in the first-to-seven series, with the next set of races scheduled for Saturday.

    Because of Bermuda’s drones laws, Bowers did not travel with the team. Instead, he and his family of four (their son was born in Auckland) headed back to Wisconsin, where he is trying to start his own company, Bear UAV, using a 3-D carbon fiber printer to stamp out new drones.


    But he isn’t finished with sailing. After the America’s Cup, Bowers will shoot the Corfu Challenge, a race in Greece next month.

    Leandro Spina is U.S. Sailing’s Olympic development director. He works for the race and recruited Bowers to film it. “He can fly in conditions other people cannot,” Spina said. “When it gets pretty windy, Nick will fly. Other people will be like, ‘No, it’s too windy.’ But he has no limitation with drones.”


    Nick Bowers VIMEO Page

    http://kettlecinema.com/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  8. #558

  9. #559
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    Spithill: "The Cup Is Useless"



    New Zealand's Civilian pens this piece... Enjoy!


    Oracle Team USA skipper Jimmy Spithill has blamed his team’s America’s Cup loss on not wanting to win.

    “It’s a useless cup and I wanted to get rid of the bloody thing,” he told media today, breaking his silence for the first time since the initial post-match press conference.

    “The past seven years have been a nightmare. I don’t know who designed it but it’s obvious they never used a cup in their lives.

    “I think more about the America’s Cup than my own family. It really is an obsession.”

    Spithill said the problems first came to light when the Oracle team tried to drink champagne from the Cup following their 2010 win.

    “The thing weighs a bloody ton and you can’t drink from it single-handed, so good luck if you want a durrie to go with it.”

    “We thought maybe it’d get easier, maybe when we hadn’t been racing right before, but it’s so long it’s like doing a yardie every time.”

    Spithill said the problems only grew once he got the Cup home.

    “Try fitting that in your standard-sized kitchen cupboard. You can’t. Too bloody tall. The kiwis had someone take to it with a sledgehammer when they had it to try and cut it down to size, but it didn’t work.”

    Spithill said his frustrations with the Cup peaked in early 2013 when he tried to use it to make a mug cake.

    “They call it the Auld Mug but you just try and make a simple mug cake in there. Bloody nightmare. Then you can’t clean the damn thing because it just goes on forever and you’d need an elephant trunk to get right up in that business.”

    He said he was looking forward to losing the Cup in 2013, and almost succeeded. However, when Emirates Team New Zealand were up 8-1, Oracle boss Larry Ellison promised that if Spithill claimed victory, he’d keep the Cup in one of his garages. “Didn’t bloody happen though, did it?” Spithill said quietly while carving an AC/DC logo into the desk.

    Since then Spithill attempted to use the Cup as a travel mug (“Doesn’t have a lid, doesn’t fit in the cup holder”), for baking measurements (“It’s not even an actual cup”), and as a coffee mug at the office (“Someone crooked fucker always thieves off with it”).

    Spithill also noted that the Cup is not dishwasher or microwave safe and doesn’t fit under an espresso machine.

    “Don’t know how the kiwis expect to get it under their Nespresso machine. They’re dreaming.”

    “You go home at night and you can’t wait to get up and leave in the morning just so you can get away from it.”

    Spithill said the team had tried hard to lose every race in the 2017 regatta.

    Apart from one accidental win, he was happy with their efforts. “Every day I just try, I put everything I have in to getting the result.

    “And now I have.”

    Emirates Team New Zealand helmsman Peter Burling said the kiwis hadn’t yet decided what they’d do with the Cup, but were entertaining offers from the Te Papa bagcheck counter and a Hamilton McDonald’s, for display in the playground.

    He added that after “all the hubbub” of the past few weeks, the team was looking forward to a return to the normality of New Zealanders not caring about sailing.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  10. #560
    Where is Jimmy headed next?

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