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Thread: OYRA crewed Farallons

  1. #41
    Looks like Photo Boy has lost a lot of weight since the last time I saw him up close and personal.

  2. #42
    Tattoos too. Success can ruin some people.

  3. #43
    wow, i take it back: we should all have nanny boats, if that's what the crews look like.

  4. #44
    What type of risk? Well, would they do the Farallones race without a chase boat or heli?

    More power to them, as long as I don't get scored against them, I'd rather have them out there.

  5. #45
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    SC 50 Deception Checks In

    The Farallones race is an important event every sailing season: part invigorating challenge, part depleting grind. Over the last couple years the race has been treated with greater respect as well. The 2015 running provided lots of different conditions and good competition. The race started off the St. Francis Yacht Club under gray skies that looked like they intended to hang around all weekend. Deception and all the boats in PHRO1 had a clean start and set course for the middle channel to pick up the ebb tide. We were in close proximity to three boats much of the day: Adrenalin, Hana Ho and California Condor. We all worked our way out the channel with a southwesterly breeze that was variable (7 – 11 knots) that promised a right shift later on in the course.

    Near Point Bonita the wind seemed to build enough to warrant a change to the #3. Yes, yes, fooled again and we watched Hana Ho and Adrenalin take a strong lead. But as Henry Rollins suggest, “Never Relent”. and we changed back up to the #1. Adrenalin was to the south of us in what appeared to be better breeze so that on our next cross they were ahead by about 1/3 mile. Hana Ho had taken off north and we didn’t see much of them the rest of the day. We worked to stay in phase with the 20˚ shifts and a couple of crosses later we found ourselves in the lead by about that same 1/3 mile. Being on starboard tack paid as the wind kept clocking and ended up around 280˚ , but not before a slow hour spent in winds of 5 – 8 knots which our tactician was able to drive us through while holding our lead. As we approached the islands, we were actually able to crack off a bit as we were being lifted right to the islands. The direction of the wind meant that we had to sail almost half a mile beyond the islands before we could bear away and set. We spent this interim period under the Code Zero, while Adrenalin set a chute and were closing fast. However, once were able to put up the A1 we pulled back out to a comfortable lead. The sun eventually came out and the wind speed built enough to make the sail back fun, though one last challenge lay ahead.

    As we were sailing past Point Bonita with winds in the mid-teens, the neighborhood seemed to all of a sudden get very crowded. Deception was south of mid-span aimed at the South Tower. Over our right shoulder a freighter was barreling in. Closer to shore a tug was towing a barge past Mile Rock. We also noticed another freighter rounding Harding Rock and headed our way. The funnel inside Point Bonita never seemed so small. We decided that we needed to get south ahead of the freighter and the barge even though that put us nearer to Baker Beach than was comfortable. We did cross both ships and had about ˝ mile to go to the South Tower. We gybed, flew the A2 on the tack line briefly, and gybed back to starboard under the tower. The South Tower demon chose this moment to pipe the winds up over 20 knots, but we kept the boat in control on a hard reach to the finish line. We held our comfortable lead the whole way back, but the finish time delta is deceptive. Adrenalin has already this season proven to be a fast boat and they were tenacious. But inside Point Bonita they were further north and ended up the meat in a commercial traffic sandwich. Luckily we all kept our heads in the game and took line honors. Some on board suggested it was the brownies we had on board. But given that they were 2/3rds blackened by a kitchen novice, they only proved that we need our cookie girl/man trimmer back.

    Mike Arrajj
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  6. #46
    Nice write up Mike!

  7. #47
    As I look at the finish times of the SSS Farallones race where all but a couple of 200+ raters finished before dark I wonder if the OYRA Farallones race should start earlier.

    I guess we would just be trading staying up late for getting up early but it might give us more time to complete the race.

    Any thoughts or comments pro or con on moving the OYRA Farallones start an hour or two earlier?

  8. #48
    I think it's a crap shoot, whether u drift around in the am looking for breeze, or the middle, or the end. It might mean less after dark sailing but I kinda like that myself. So I vote "meh".

  9. #49
    I'm a big fan of night sailing, but not a big fan of sitting on a race deck after dark. Gets cold sitting there.

    Whatever works for you guys.

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Newell View Post
    As I look at the finish times of the SSS Farallones race where all but a couple of 200+ raters finished before dark I wonder if the OYRA Farallones race should start earlier.

    I guess we would just be trading staying up late for getting up early but it might give us more time to complete the race.

    Any thoughts or comments pro or con on moving the OYRA Farallones start an hour or two earlier?
    Why not start around 1600, round at dusk, and have a nightime firehouse reach home in the dark? Oh, and include Dux on the way out. That would be a cool course.

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