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Thread: Gryphon Solo 2: Around The World Solo Attempt

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    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Gryphon Solo 2: Around The World Solo Attempt



    Joe Harris has departed Newport R.I. On his Class 40' GryphonSolo 2 in attempt to sail solo around the world. Here is his 1st entry in his log book on the progress:

    Status updated: 23 hrs and 46 mins ago (Sun, November 15 @ 17:36:08)

    Hello Friends- Well it has certainly been quite a day here aboard GS2. We gathered at 7:00AM at the boat and got things together while we waited for Hugh Piggin to come around with a very large RIB which would take out my family and get crew members Rob Windsor and Tristan Moulogne off the boat after helping me get set up. My goodbyes to my wife Kim and son Emmett were teary- no question about it, but this journey and my absence will be hard on all of us- but the spirit of optimism prevailed. We got away from the dock cleanly- got the mainsail and solent jib up and set- and sailed down to the start line between Castle Hill light in Newport and Beavertail light in Jamestown. After a trial run to choose the right sail combination, we transferred the crew off and I sailed across the start line at 9:18:24 AM EST... hoping to return without stopping sometime in March... what a concept.

    I put our A6 fractional kite up, but the wind was too strong and I took it back down before I could really use it. I have now sailed out about 75 miles out past Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket and we have been absolutely sendin' it in 22-30 knots of wind from about a 120' true wind angle which this boat just loves- so speeds have been in consistently in the teens and a top speed of 19.2. Talk about a flying start! Its predicted to stay like this for the next three days as we head for a waypoint to enter the gulfstream at about 38N X 67W. But fast is wet, and there are a lot of waves breaking over the boat and I have been seriously doused a few times already- but luckily staying dry and warm in my new Musto foul weather gear from TeamOne in Newport- thank you Martha Parker! I have been visited by three pods of dolphins and a little bird has taken up residence in the cabin, so Mother Nature seems to be welcoming me to her world. So for right now all is good and making great progress and fingers crossed it stays that way. I have all the sails and gear stacked to windward in the main cabin and am looking forward to spending my first night at sea on this long voyage in my wet weather gear sleeping on the sails- it will not be boring! Cheers- Joe PS- I am about to start the book "The Martian" that everyone has been raving about and telling me I have to read. I heard the movie was great but I usually like to read the book and then see the movie so I'm psyched to start it.

    http://www.gryphonsolo2.com/


    http://www.gryphonsolo2.com/page/skipper_team
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    Day 2 Report:

    Hello Friends-
    It has been pretty busy since I left off with you yesterday. Last night, as I approached the continental shelf, I was wary about snagging one of those big offshore lobster pots that I have snagged so many times before, so I was watching closely on the radar, as some of them have radar reflectors. We were screaming along at about 13 knots in 25-35 knots of wind when I heard the telltale bang and the boat began to slow down and I knew I was screwed. The boat came to a complete stop and the sails began to flap madly and the auto-pilot alarm went off and all of this in the pitch black of midnight.

    Frickin' awesome. I went forward to furl the solent jib but there was too much load on it and it would not furl, so I returned to the cockpit and sheeted both the main and solent in tight to stop the flapping. I was not at all sure what I was going to do next when I remembered that I had just received a bon voyage gift from fellow solo sailor Rich Wilson, which was a 22' extendable Japanese tree saw with a very sharp two foot blade at the end. I dove below to retrieve it- assembled it quickly on deck and then lay on my belly on the deck and leaned over the windward side of the boat- lowered the saw in- and with one cut the big aluminum pot stick popped out of the water and floated away. A tremendous sense of relief swept over me. But now the boat was moving again and I had this 22' dangerous weapon that I had to sheath and disassemble- so that boat had to wait and gybed itself a few times for fun. I finally got the saw put away below and got the boat moving in the right direction and poured myself a Jameson and cocoa- drenched in the salt of sweat and sea water. So- thank you Rich Wilson- you saved my bacon- and I'm really not sure what I would have done without the saw.

    So- the perfect beginning to a RTW voyage eh? It has been consistently blowing over 20 knots of wind from the WNW and we have been making good time. I had to gybe the boat in the wee hours of the morning as a wind shift had us going South and Ken Campbell from Commanders Weather is adamant that we get East early, so I am dutifully heading East as we speak and am somewhere near the north wall of the gulf stream. Another windy night, so the boat is moving along well under A5 fractional kite and two reefs in the main at a 140-degree True Wind Angle.

    I am still trying to get used to the fact that I am actually out here and doing this- my lifelong dream- but it’s a little bit of "be careful what you wish for" as the reality of the enormity of the challenge is setting in. So I'm trying to take it one minute, one hour, one day, one week, one month at a time. I am focused on breathing- that seems to help.

    Cheers-

    Joe

    PS- I heard Pats over Giants in a nail-biter- still undefeated- yeah baby- do your job- we are on to Cincinnati!!
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    30 Knot Maniac ShanaCruz50's Avatar
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    Go! Joe! Go!

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    A New Record For GryphonSolo2




    Hello folks-
    Today I became aware of a new competitor out here on the great Atlantic race course and that is a gentleman named Henrik Masekowitz. Henrik is from Germany and is attempting to break the same record as I am- 137 days around the world, solo, non-stop, unassisted for a monohull boat 40' or less. Henrik started from France two days before I did and is sailing a Class 40 Akilaria RC 1 named "Croix du Sud", whereas as I am sailing an Akilaria RC2. Both boats were designed by naval architect Marc Lombard in France and built in Tunisia by MC-Tech- Henrik's in 2007 and GS2 in 2011. Pretty darn similar boats. I believe

    Henrik's web site is: http://www.soloceans.de and he is also on YB tracker at http://yb.tl/hmsailing.

    So it is "Game On" sports fans... we have a race on our hands, which is I think is what both Henrik and I were hoping for in both originally trying to do the Global Ocean Race, which is no longer happening.
    So here we are- completely unexpectedly- joined on the race course around the world- but he coming from France and me coming from Newport. I think the mileages are pretty similar and we will meet up at the equator and then sail the same course around the bottom of the globe- leaving the five great capes to port and Antarctica to starboard- and ultimately around Cape Horn at the southern tip of South America and then back up to the equator and then splitting paths, with Henrik back to France and me to Newport.

    Henrik's record attempt is also being reviewed by the World Speed Sailing Records Council in England as my attempt is. It's quite ironic, isn't it?
    Upon reflection, I do think it’s pretty cool... as long as I win smile emoticon However, if I break the old record but lose to Henrik, that could potentially suck... but let’s not go there girlfriend.
    I know for a fact that this will sharpen my competitive instincts and cause me to push even harder, while remembering that you can't win unless you finish safely.
    So, Henrik- I wish you safe and fast passage... just not too fast pal... and for the first leg... I'll wager you a bottle of fine French champagne I get to the Equator first- even with your two-day head start!
    Best to all-

    Joe aboard GS2- 28'21 N X 56' 14 W on 11/20/15







    Hello Friends-
    It continues to be wet and woolly out here in the North Atlantic as the Northeast wind from 20-45 knots continued unabated. Squally, rainy, gusty conditions prevail, as we navigate around a low pressure system just to the East.

    Last night it really blew hard- but I had prepared well and had three reefs in the Mainsail and the ORC#4 heavy weather jib and we were able to withstand even the gusts up to 46 knots without a problem. With confidence in my sail plan, I was able to get some pretty good sleep, which is really important for continued good reasoning and functionality. I am also eating more now that my body has grown accustomed to the motion of the boat, and had a great Beef Stroganoff freeze dried meal before going to sleep last night. This morning it was a delicious Apple Crisp (apples, cinnamon and granola) for breakfast and I am feeling pretty good. I am also taking these Juice Plus vitamins that my friend Cyndee Novitch got me just before departure that are meant to replace all the fresh fruits and vegetables I was not able to bring along. Should be a pretty good balanced diet once I get settled in.

    So the short-term weather is another two days of the heavy stuff and then a few days of light stuff before breaking through into the Southeast trade winds which, looking longer term, will propel me down towards our Leg One waypoint at 10N x 35W, just north of the equator. This will set me up for the passage though the Doldrums and then out into the South Atlantic trade winds. That is the Ken Campbell/ Commanders Weather plan as adopted by yours truly and I am excited to have gotten off to a good start and my hope is to get to that first waypoint in less than the 15 -17 days we had estimated for Leg One of the 10 Leg RTW journey. I show 1,862 miles to go- which at 8 knots would be about 10 days- so fingers crossed I am able to keep up the speed.




    GryphonSolo2 is holding up well to the pounding. I am experiencing some problems with the water maker that seems to have some air in its system, and is producing fresh water only very anemically and not close to its specified 1.5 Gallons per hour. However, I may need to wait for more settled conditions to really address it.

    So that is the Day 4 report- hopefully the level of drama will decline as the weather chills out and I settle into onboard routines. I was able to (painfully) send the first photo back yesterday and will attempt to send more.

    Happy 9th birthday to my daughter Sophie Grace- a big day for my special girl-
    Love to all-
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    Week One Under The Wings



    Joe Harris of the Class 40' GryphonSolo 2 with his week 1 recap:

    Week One
    Hello Friends-

    I am writing to try to recap the highlights and learnings from Week One of the projected 16-19 week solo, circumnavigation record attempt.
    Departure: My departure on early Sunday morning from Newport Shipyard was filled with bittersweet emotions as I was very sad to leave my wife Kim and son Emmett on the dock. After wiping away some tears and taking a few minutes to collect myself, we pushed off the dock and before I knew it I was past Breton Reef bout and launched on a four month solo circumnavigation. Holy Shit Batman- be careful what you wish for! The feeling was kind of surreal, as if this were not really happening to me, and I would just sail to Block Island like usual and have a mudslide and fried calamari at the Oar. Not today sir.


    Weather: We were absolutely pounded right out of the box and for the first five days with wind between 20 and 45 knots, luckily mainly from the North, so behind us. We were sailing really fast - 11-24 knots- and it made me remember what a fabulous boat I have- she just wants to pick up and go.
    The lobster pot: As I feared, I snagged a large lobster pot buoy going 15 knots over the Continental Shelf in the middle of the first night out- nice. Luckily I had ordered my new Japanese Ginsu knife set while watching TV too late at night and was able to cut myself free- good thing- as otherwise I'd probably still be there- as I was not psyched to go scuba diving that night.
    The accidental gybe in the Gulf Stream: My two nemeses are the Cape Cod Canal and the Gulf stream- bad stuff always seems to happen there.
    In horrible cross sea conditions, the stern of the boat was picked up and tossed in such a way that the wind caught the mainsail on its opposite side and the traveler car came screaming across the boat and smashed a block while I waded around in knee deep water in the cockpit. Pretty scary.

    To bring things full circle, after the storm blew itself out, I was becalmed for about four hours last night, but am now moving well again in an Easterly breeze that feels like trade winds but may just be the precursor. I decided to totally chill while becalmed rather than stress and watched two great movies: The Departed, with Dinero, Damon and Dicaprio and then Legends of the Fall with Brad Pitt- most enjoyable.
    Observations:

    1. The boat can handle just about anything with the right sail plan. With three reefs in the main and the ORC #4 jib, we can handle up to 45 knots. The last move would be the fourth reef and storm jib, which would handle 50 knots and above. In the light stuff- we can match wind speed with the Code Zero on a beam reach- so this boat, equipped with great sails, really is the weapon of choice for this mission.

    2. The water maker would not make water at the higher boat speeds as it could not get adequate suction to bring in salt water to convert to fresh. I was beginning to worry about this as I do not have near enough water onboard to make it around- but working on the advice of Josh Hall and Brian Harris, I ran a hose from the water maker to the leeward water ballast tank and allowed the unit to pull salt water from there and it ran beautifully and made about 4 gallons in four hours- setting my mind at ease.

    3. The onboard environment: food has been good with breakfast of coffee and granola and blueberries or cinnamon apples, lunch of tuna, chicken or salmon with mayo on a wrap or mixed in with ramen noodles- dinners Mountain House freeze dried- Beef stroganoff, sweet and sour pork, chicken a la king- chocolate and cookie as needed- not bad at all. I have been able to get a decent amount of sleep each 24 hour period despite the rough weather- mostly sleeping in full FW gear on sail bags so I can get up if I need to. As it gets warmer now I will look forward to the bunk.

    4. Weather and navigation have been a nice team effort with Commanders Weather who selected a great window for my fast departure and has allowed me to get about halfway to my Leg One Waypoint at 15 North / 35 West. The Leg is about 2,684 miles long and I have covered about 1,340 on the Great Circle route from Newport (although I sailed more miles than that on my actual path) and have about the same distance to go this coming week. Commanders predicted 15 days duration for this opening leg- I'm hoping I can beat that- and be there before November 30th.
    We shall see- Happy Sunday night to all-
    Cheers
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    Monday Night Sh*t Show

    Hi-
    Not such a great 24 hours for Team Joey and GS2. Last night was a shit show of one major squall after the next, bringing major thunder, lightning, wind gusting up to 30kn and heavy downpours of rain upon your faithful captain. I was OK with the first couple of these, but then I became really wet and cold and the fun kinda went out of it. It was also a bit scary to be perfectly honest, although the lightning was up higher in the sky and not actually landing in the water. I remember once doing a solo delivery back from Bermuda and I got caught in a huge thunder and lightning storm (in the Gulf Stream of course- my nemesis), where I was pretty damn sure my mast was going to get hit by lightning and blow a hole in the bottom of the boat. With no other boats around, if you were a lightning bolt, why wouldn't you hit the tall shiny metal object all by itself in the middle of the ocean?? Anyway, it missed me then and it missed me last night, thank God.

    So the rest of the day has been spent sailing in light air, upwind- something that GS2 does not really like to do. This causes me a lot of stress because I think I should be able to solve the problem- except I can't- because it kinda "is what it is" as they say. The boat will go upwind properly in 12 knots of wind or more, but in 12 knots or less, we get sticky, because the boat is so wide and flat. And tonight we have 7 knots. Awesome.

    I hear that fella Henrik the German is coming down the pike past the Canary and Cape Verde Islands and is enjoying fast trade wind sailing- the bastard. He has a much better downwind sailing angle as he approaches the Doldrums and Equator from Europe vs. the US. Just a fact. I should have a more favorable angle on the return leg from the doldrums to Newport in the Spring.
    Break- break- more wind now, although still right on the nose, causing me to aim closer to the "bulge of Brazil" than I would like. Hopefully the wind will come astern more and strengthen tomorrow, so I can aim a little further East. For now, GS2 has undergone a warm weather transformation- with all the cold weather gear stowed away and the food and gear better organized for upwind sailing and life at a 20-degree heel and warmer temps.

    Reading "The Martian" and loving it- the perfect book for me right now.

    Have a good night-
    Cheers-
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    DEC 1st Update




    Hello Sports Fans-

    I'm coming to you live from the "Bulge of Brazil"- getting very close to the Equator! We (me and the boat) are roughly 430 miles away, so at a 10 knot average that would get me there in 43 hours, which would be the wee hours of Thursday morning. Crewed boats typically make a party of the Equator Crossing, with someone dressing up as King Neptune and crew members making offerings to placate the gods.
    I am thinking of a Jameson and coffee with a fine cigar- a "Gryphon"- courtesy of my good bud Jeff Hacker. So, as you can tell, I am looking forward to that- and will send a photo commemorating the moment that the GPS shows 0.00 degrees for latitude.

    So life at sea here in the tropics goes on- 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of darkness. It is very warm and very windy- usually blowing about 20 knots- and the sea conditions are rough- so the boat gets very wet. It is almost comical, every time I go on deck, I am greeted by a large wall of water in the face. I feel like the clown in the circus when they do that comedy routine and some unsuspecting clown gets splattered with a bucket of water- that would be me. Usually I have just put on a clean shirt and shorts and I naively go on deck just for a little fresh air- and Wham- I get nailed with a wave in the face and get completely soaked.

    So now I have shorts and t-shirts hanging everywhere in the cabin, which really don't dry in these rain-forest like conditions- and I find foul-weather gear just way too hot in this climate- so mostly I am naked (and afraid?) and nobody seems to mind. I am just covered in salt water and am really trying to avoid salt water sores, particularly on my butt, which is a common affliction for sailors. So, I will leave it there- looking for the next downpour of rain so I can run on deck and have a fresh water shower!

    The boat is holding up well- I have had two reefs in the main and the Solent jib up for quite a while and the boat likes the combo of power from the jib without too much weather helm from the main. The auto-pilot steers 99% of the time and the hydro-generator puts out between 12 and 20 amps of power which is enough to run the AP's and electronics and keep the batteries topped up at over 13 volts. So I have not really had to focus on energy conservation much at all- and can use the computer and sat comms fairly freely- which is nice. If we slow down, this may change, and I am hoping the solar panels will then kick in, but they have not been major energy contributor so far. I have only run the diesel engine once so far, just to make sure it still worked.

    So that’s my pre-Equator story- looking forward to visiting the southern hemisphere for only the second time under sail- the 2005 Transat Jacque Vabre from France to Salvadore, Brazil being the other time.
    Stay thirsty my friends-
    Joe


    http://www.gryphonsolo2.com/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    Hello Sports fans-

    Big day today- as GS2 and I have just crossed the Equator- showing the latitude on the GPS clicking to 0'00.000! (see photo below) Very exciting- and the first major milestone passed on this long voyage. It certainly feels good to have accomplished this first goal and to be in the southern hemisphere!

    However, the bigger picture challenge has been the "Battle of the Bulge", or my never-ending quest to get around the NE corner of Brazil- b...y the city of Recife. This is still about 450 miles south, so another two days sailing. At that point, I expect the winds to begin to come more from the ENE rather than the ESE that they have been, i.e. right on the nose- and this will be a welcome relief from about 10 days of continuous pounding to windward.

    So- a few stats for ya: Note: These numbers are from my B&G instrument system, so are very accurate, except for the fact that I turned the "Trip Log" function on about 36 hours after I started (typical), so I have made some estimates for that discrepancy.

    Distance travelled (Great Circle): 3,560 nm
    Distance travelled- through the water: 4,008
    Trip time: 17 days, 21 hours, or 429 hours
    Average Speed: 8.3 knots (based on Great Circle distance- average speed is higher based on total distance sailed)
    Top Speed: 24.6 knots



    http://www.gryphonsolo2.com/
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    Beyond the Bulge - Day 21




    Hello Friends-

    It has been a good week here on GS2- and today is another spectacular sunny day with 14-20 knots of breeze from behind me, so life is good. Getting around that damn Bulge of Brazil was an ordeal, involving many days of upwind sailing, so I am very glad to have that in the rear view mirror. On the bright side, I was able to finish my book "Cutting for Stone" by Abraham Verghese, which I would highly recommend to all.

    As we move south down the coast, I see Salvador, Brazil is about 260 miles to the West, which is where Josh Hall and I finished the 2005 Transat Jacque Vabre Race, taking first place in the Open 50 class. I think we sailed the course from LeHavre, France in about 21 days, so I am about to surpass my longest time at sea on a sail boat. The last two weeks have been mainly upwind work, which- after a while- beats up on the boat and its crew, so I am very glad to be going downwind, and I think GS2 is as well! The easy motion of the boat through the water is like being on magic carpet ride- particularly at night- and is a much-needed and welcome relief.

    So- I was wondering if ya'll got your invitations to the GS2 dance party held last night between 2:00 and 4:00 AM about 140 miles off the coast of Brazil? Wait- you didn't get an invitation? Funny- I didn't either- but the party just kinda spontaneously combusted.

    I was lying in my little sleeping nest by the nav station- watching the numbers and the chart plotter and making minute course adjustments as I usually do- and decided to listen to some music to help me fall asleep. I started with some James Taylor- Best of- which was very nice- but instead of making me sleepy- it made me a bit melancholy, and I switched over to some Little Feat and whoa- that got the party started. I can't quite explain it, but I had what I might describe as a "cathartic release", as all the tension of the past three weeks and getting used to being alone on the boat all came gushing out.

    Some serious air guitar was played in the cockpit under a kaleidoscope of stars, as oceans of tears flowed from deep inside me- not sad tears- nor really happy tears- just tears of release of all the stress bottled up inside since before the start of this voyage. It’s been a lot- and it felt really great to just let it rip- from Little Feat to the Rolling Stones, Talking Heads, Eric Clapton and Michael Jackson (Billie Jean, Bad- robot… yes ; moonwalk… not so much) and finishing at sun-up with Pink Floyd- Dark Side of the Moon… Breathe… Breathe in the Air. Nice…
    When the sparkler finally burned out- I was spent- but felt much better. It would have been fun to get some of awesome air guitar scenes on video, but I think my family would disown me! Better that stays between me, GS2, and the South Atlantic!

    So this week looks like some nice downwind sailing, with the goal of eventually getting south to get into the prevailing Westerlies at the bottom of the South Atlantic and then into the Southern Ocean. The temptation is to turn left early and head for Capetown, but history has shown that patience is rewarded in getting South before trying to get West, due to the St. Helena high pressure system that lurks waiting to ensnare the impatient mariner. If one does become caught and becalmed for days on end, it becomes like in the Horse Latitudes- throw the animals overboard to lighten ship- hope the grog doesn't run out- and pity the cabin boy! That is not where I want to be!

    So- here is hoping that the coming week is a good one for all- that the Christmas spirit of giving slowly envelopes us- and we all feel gratitude for our many gifts-
    With love and appreciation for all your support-

    Joe and GS2 on the Kharma Bus rippin' along in the South Atlantic
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    Big Blow's A Comin!




    Hello Friends-

    It has been pretty mellow the last two days, but here are a few news items:

    - Yesterday GS2 and I completed Leg 2 of the 10 leg Round-the-world circumnavigation plan put together with Commanders weather. The waypoint we just passed was at 30' South X 30 ' West and the Leg distance was approximately 2,500 nautical miles. We will continue in a Southeast direction, slowly getting into the trademark westerly winds of the 'Roaring Forties" latitudes.



    - I believe I am becoming "The Incredible Shrinking Man"- I can almost see my leg muscles- quads, and calves- shrinking as I must not be using them the way I normally do! My upper body and waist have also shrunk, but not quite so dramatically. So- in response- I have initiated a 3X daily exercise program that involves, toe raises (calves), lunges (quads), squats (quads), push-ups (upper body) and sit-ups (core) to stop the muscle atrophy. I am really surprised at how quickly this is happening and I do not feel any weaker, but I think I'd better address the issue before it becomes a bigger deal.

    - I have been reading up a storm and have recently finished John Grisham's "Sycamore Row" which was really excellent and also "The Girl on the Train" by Paula Hawkins, which was pretty good, but kinda a chick book. I brought some hard copy books and also have a bunch of books and movies and podcasts on my I-pad, but I am already concerned that at my current rate of consumption,

    I will be reading everything a second time by March!

    - Food update- A tragedy has occurred- my favorite Baby Belle cheeses- the ones in the wax wrapper- have all succumbed to the heat and have gone bad. Mournful sigh. However, on the brighter side, this morning I discovered a large cache of pop tarts, which were at risk of getting crushed and destroyed up in the bow sail locker, so I have retrieved those and have commenced a one week "Pop Tart Festival". If you are going to have a muffin or a doughnut, you might as well have a Pop-Tart- they ain't bad!

    - Christmas shopping for GS2 branded performance gear is available at Team One Newport- just go to this link: http://www.team1newport.com/Gryphon-.../products/844/
    This is great stuff at good prices so load up Santa's sleigh!

    - As they say in the great state of Maine, "We got some weatha a comin'". The forecast is for two days of 20-40 knot winds starting late tonight and going through Thursday night. I have been cleaning up and organizing the boat for the blow, and will hopefully be prepared to be both safe and fast.



    - I took the mainsail down today for an inspection prior to the stormy weather and it was a good thing I did, because two of the pins that hold the batten cars to the mast cars had worked their way loose and were about to pop out completely (see picture below or on Facebook - this is a normal car). I think the small cotter pins holding the vertical pins had sheared off, so I replaced them with larger, stronger pins that I'm pretty sure will do the job. I am very glad I got to that before the storm or I may have had a significant problem with the mainsail in the heavy weather.

    - Henrik update: I don't know quite how to explain it, but our German friend Henrik Masekowitz has separated dramatically to the East (his position at 1200 UTC Dec. 15 was 35' 27 N X 8' 27 W), with nearly 1,100 miles between us- mostly East-West. The common theory is that the South Atlantic high pressure area is typically right where he currently is, but somehow he keeps on truckin' and has been averaging over 10 knots for a while, as I have been struggling with Doldrum-like conditions. It is hard to say when the two boats may converge- as we are sailing in totally different conditions at the moment- but it is a long way to the finish line, so we just have to hang in there- and maybe I can make up some ground in the next two days.

    So that’s about it for now from GS2- just west of the Tristan Da Cunha Islands in the South Atlantic-
    Be Well-
    Joe

    http://www.gryphonsolo2.com/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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