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Thread: Gryphon Solo 2: Around The World Solo Attempt

  1. #11
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    Winter Solstice Report From Joe Harris



    Latest Update from Joe & Team:

    Status updated: 18 hrs and 55 mins ago (Sun, December 20 @ 17:18:27)
    Day 35 - Tristan Da Cunha

    Hello Friends-

    Hope you all are enjoying a festive holiday Sunday- I know Santa is hard at work and everyone is busy with gifts and parties.

    Things are good out here in the South Atlantic- the wind is honking from behind us and we are going fast, so that is always a positive, although it is cold and grey and rainy.

    We are approaching the three-island group called Tristan Da Cunha, which was named by a Portuguese explorer of the same name who sighted the island in 1506. This is a British property that is part of a government agreement with Asension and St.Helena islands to the north. The population of 300 hardy souls are farmers and fisherman. I think we will split between the three islands tonight around midnight, so I won't get to see much, although I believe the island has a 10,000 foot peak. I will have to watch out for the wind shadow on the lee side.

    More GS2 breaking news:

    - I finished reading "The Girl in the Spiders Web", the fourth book in a series by Swedish author Steig Larsson, which began with the best-seller and movie, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo". Steig Larsson died and a new author, David Lagercrantz, picked up the series, and I thought this book was just as good cas the others. Highly recommend the series.

    - The boat is in pretty good shape- nothing broken or mal-functioning at the moment, just trying to address some small leaks that become a problem when we experience big breaking seas or torrential rains.

    - The forecast for the next four days is for winds between 20 and 40 knots- mostly from the West- so we should be able to make some good time.




    - Update on my German competitor Henrik: Evidently Henrik took a bad fall and injured his ankle and is heading to Cape Town to seek medical treatment. I don't have a lot of details, but Henrik stated in a blog post that this will end his solo, RTW record attempt, which is a shame. Henrik was quite a ways in front of me, having sailed a quite different course coming south from Europe instead of North Americas as I did. It was going to be a real challenge to try to catch him in the Southern Ocean and I was really looking forward to that. I send my best wishes to Henrik and his family- I know he must be gutted- but we are brothers in arms and he will live to fight another day.

    - My friend Julianna Barbieri of Manuka Sports Event Management- Owner- operators of the Atlantic Cup Class 40 race- was recently attending a world yacht racing symposium and ran in to the PR person for Chinese sailor Guo Chuan, the sailor that holds the record I am trying to break. Mr. Chuan's representative said that they were very aware of my attempt to break the record and were posting updates of my progress to their Facebook page and other social media. Interestingly, she said they had done some routing analysis and concluded that I had a pretty decent chance to break the record going from Newport to Newport, versus their course of round trip to Quing Dao China. Our two boats are exact sister ships, so the challenge now reverts to simply breaking Chuan's record of 137 days, rather than having to beat Henrik as well.

    Conclusion- You have to finish to win- and to finish you need to keep the boat and yourself together. I will be tested by these high winds and seas these next four days, but plan to do everything I can to protect the boat, as the pounding we took in the last gale was not fun, nor good for the boat.

    Break- more to follow- Go Pats!!

    Cheers-
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  2. #12
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    Dec23 Update

    Hello Friends-
    Yesterday was a tough day. It was very stormy, with enormous seas and winds between 30 and 45 knots throwing the boat all over the place. It was hard to simply stand up. In the middle of this, I began to smell something burning. It smelled like melting plastic... and that’s what it turned out to be. The "black box" regulator that sits under my navigation seat for my hydro-generator system that takes the AC current produced from the propellers spinning off the back of the boat and turns it into DC current to charge the batteries, had overheated and fried its circuit board

    I knew I smelled something bad, but it took me a while to locate the smell and then get the whole thing apart and when I finally did, I knew in a second I was screwed. The two hydro-gens that look like little outboard engine legs hanging off the transom of the boat just port and starboard of centerline (see Facebook/attached photo) had provided roughly 90% of all the electricity I have used to date on the trip. They are wonderful “free” energy in that they consume nothing and produce lots of electricity when the boat goes fast. I don't know exactly why the regulator box got so hot and ended up melting the board. The best theory is that since the boat was going very fast, the hydro props were spinning fast and produced more electricity than the regulator and batteries could handle, and that excess energy turned into heat, which melted the circuit board.






    Unfortunately, I don't have either a spare regulator box onboard, nor do I have enough diesel fuel to charge the batteries for the estimated 85 days left in the voyage without the benefit of the hydros’ contribution.

    For this reason, I have elected to divert GS2 to Cape Town, South Africa, which is about 1,000 miles due East and not far off my current path, in order to replace the burned regulator box and get my hydro-gen system going again.

    I plan to make the repairs as quickly as possible in Cape Town- without touching land- which should allow me to get back out on the race course with minimal time lost. However, this stopover will mean the end of my official record attempt in the eyes of the governing World Speed Sailing Records Council due to stopping to receive "outside assistance", which is not allowed for a solo, non-stop circumnavigation record attempt. While this is a big bummer no question, I have to remember that my goal began as simply sailing solo around the world safely, with the record piece being a bonus. I am now returning to those basic goals, and feel good about being out here for the right reasons. To be clear, I do intend to pursue the record of 137 days "unofficially", as I still think I can beat it, even with lost time to the stopover- and wouldn't that be cool?

    So I hope you will continue to support the "Team GS2 Totally Excellent Kharma Bus RTW 2015/16 Campaign" (now there's a good t-shirt!) and I will continue to provide frequent Facebook/email updates as I have thus far.

    Thanks for your ongoing support. Game is still on. Happy holidays to all!
    Cheers-
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  3. #13
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    Dec 24 Update




    Hello friends-

    Merry Christmas to all- I hope Santa's work is nearly done and it’s now time for the holiday parties to begin!

    I am a little more than 800 miles West of Cape Town, SA and steaming that direction at 11 knots in yet another 30K breeze. ETA Monday Dec. 29th.

    It has been a trying 72 hours and I am a bit exhausted for sure- but I feel good about the game plan to head to Cape Town and get the hydro system fixed and working properly before heading into the Southern Ocean. My pals Brian Harris and Josh Hall have got me set up for an excellent welcome in Cape Town and I hope to get the repair completed and be in and out of there in less than 24 hours.
    My goals remain: 1) Sail solo around the world and return home safely and 2) Continue the attempt to beat the record of 137 days, despite the Cape Town pit stop- and "unofficial" status.

    Who knows what will happen from here? It has been a wild ride thus far and I have no doubt it will continue to be.

    But for tonight, let's just relax and celebrate and be thankful for all our gifts and for all that is good in the world... and let the Kharma Bus roll... Roll... Baby... Roll...

    Merry Christmas / Happy Holidays to all-
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  4. #14
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    Table Bay Update



    Hello Friends-

    Sorry for being quiet for a bit but it’s been very busy! Where do I begin?

    Came into Cape Town on Monday night- after a wild sail up the coast from the Cape of Good Hope. The coastline is spectacular and a strong wind from the Southeast took me up the shore in no time- arrived in Table Bay about midnight and Harbormaster Steven Bentley came out in a RIB to guide me in to Victoria Basin in 35 knots of wind in Table Bay. Very glad to get to the dock.

    Yesterday was incredibly busy. We replaced the converter box for the hydro-generators and that went well. We went for a sail/sea trial to test them in Table Bay where it always seems to be blowing 35k and everything worked well. I am very psyched to have my hydros back in action!

    However... I had been having trouble with my alternator/regulator for charging the batteries while running the engine- so the technician finally determined that the problem was in the alternator- so we pulled it out of the boat and took it to a repair shop for new brushes and diodes. I hope to get it back today and re-install and test- but not sure on the time table.

    I found that the solent jib had significant chafe so had to take the sail down and do a fairly large repair on the dock. Lots of helpers- which was great. Sail is now back on the boat and ready to go. Thank you to Terry Halpin for getting your pal Mike to help me- a very knowledgeable guy.

    My old high school pal Peter Claypool lives and works here in Cape Town and has been a huge help- it has been very nice to have an old friend here for moral support. We had a great dinner last night and he is helping me round up supplies. Thank you, Clay.

    Filled up with diesel and fresh water- now off to the grocery store for a few things- hope to depart tonight- but may be tomorrow. Although very tempting to stay here in beautiful Cape Town with people could not be more helpful and friendly. Hope a weather window opens so I can get south quickly.

    So that’s about it- I got a very nice note from my German competitor Henrik who broke his ankle and had to stop his voyage. He also pulled in here to Cape Town and was quickly flown back to Germany for surgery. His boat is the marina just down the road. Best wishes to you Henrik for a speedy recovery- I will be continuing my voyage with you and mind- hope I can make it around for both of us.

    All the best to everyone for continued holiday fun-

    Cheers
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  5. #15
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    Bidding Capetown Farewell



    Hello Friends-

    After a 10 day stop in Cape Town for repairs, in the immortal words of Willie Nelson, I am indeed "On the Road Again".

    After replacing the hydro-generator converter box, then the alternator, then the batteries, I think we finally came to the end of my charging system woes and everything seems to be working well at the moment- knock wood. It was certainly frustrating to not be able to get things done before Cape Town shut down Thursday 12/31 at noon before the New Year’s holiday week-end, but such is life. When we did get the alternator back from the repair shop on Monday- we installed it- and it did not work properly- so we had to track down another- and I threw the old one into the sea in frustration. We also determined that the batteries were no longer properly holding a charge- so we had to replace them on Tuesday. When we finally had things back together and tested on Wednesday, a cold front blew in and caused the delay in departing until Friday. Many thanks to marine electrician Chris Hutchinson, Harbormaster Steven Bentley and my old friend Peter Claypool for helping to track down all the bits and pieces necessary to make GS2 once again ready for sea.



    The reality of Cape Town weather in January is that it blows hard out of the Southeast constantly (the wind is nicknamed the "Cape Town Doctor", so as Ken Campbell from Commanders Weather says, "If you are heading East- Cape Town is an easy place to get into but a very hard place to get out of.” So we decided that even though I knew I would take a shellacking the first 12 hours, a Friday night departure was necessary to avoid the next cold front coming in on Saturday. So Claypool tossed me my lines off Quay 6 and I headed out into Table Bay- when the Doctor opened up a can of Whoop-Ass and unloaded gusts up to 40 knots as soon as I cleared the breakwater! I motored to a spot in the lee of the mountain and got my act together and set three reefs in the mainsail and the staysail and headed out. Holy Cow- I was immediately pounded by winds over 30k- gusting over 40- and the boat was very difficult to manage. I was very nervous that something was going to break, as I was hard on the wind trying to head SE towards the Cape of Good Hope into this incredible wind machine.



    Suffice it to say that last night was a long night with little rest and a lot of hand steering, as the auto-pilot would get overwhelmed in the gusts ad the boat would round up dangerously. I also had to watch out for shipping traffic- as it was fairly busy- and it reminded me a bit of the English Channel in a big blow. At daybreak the wind began to moderate into the high teens- and the sun has come out and it is actually pretty warm- which I think might be the Agulhas current- as the water temp is 75-degrees vs the usual 68-degrees.

    So- with all of your collective permission- I would like to "unofficially" pick up the record attempt where I left off- which was on Day 43- and still see if I can beat the record of 137 days based on elapsed time at sea- so not including the 10 day stopover in Cape Town. So that would mean I will need to complete the remaining 2/3 lap of the planet in 94 days at sea or less- and mathematically that is certainly feasible.

    Time to get to work-

    Cheers-
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  6. #16
    I Guess the non stop solo circumnavigation bit is out the window?

  7. #17
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    A Slice Of Time On Gryphon Solo 2



    So here is a 24 hour "slice of life" for me while I re-discover my offshore routine and rhythm:

    0530- wake up with the sun after (hopefully) a good two hour sleep- go on deck to check sail trim- make coffee- check email- have some cereal or oatmeal- nature call-

    0730- download a new weather forecast- run my routing program (Adrena)- determine where I am trying to go for the next 24-48 hours and longer term goals-

    1000- sail check- sail change- clean up cabin- check and charge batteries if needed- attack maintenance and repair chores- (often this revolves around getting water out of the boat and keeping water out of the boat)- read/write

    1200/Noon- light lunch of cheese and crackers or peanut butter or tuna/chicken w/mayo on a sea biscuit- maybe a bit of chocolate after- then if tired a nap for 20-30 minutes

    1400- focus on sailing the boat fast- make any sail changes or maneuvers (i.e tack or gybe)- in and out of foul weather gear multiple times

    1500- Receive the daily communication from Commanders Weather- check against my forecast and plan- email or quick phone chat with them if necessary- confirm 48 hour navigation plan- review any storm systems brewing in the general area that might become a factor.

    1800- light snack- check and respond to emails- get boat ready for the night- deck check of running rigging- halyards clear- sails secure- get the right sails up for the night

    2000- sun goes down- usually spend time on deck watching the sunset and have a beer or something- maybe a little music- hopefully don’t get all melancholy- a short nap usually follows

    2200- For the eight hours of darkness, I focus on keeping the boat and myself safe- avoiding collision with another vessel or land- not making a big sail change unless it is totally necessary (which it sometimes is)- Monitor battery level and energy systems- solar, hydro, engine- charge as needed throughout the day via the appropriate method

    2400- Dinner of a freeze-dried Mountain House meal if that hungry- read/write, more e-mails, maybe watch a movie or nap in 20 minute intervals

    0200- Interval napping- with 7 hour current time change to home, I call about every other day to catch my family after their dinner- read, write

    0300- Usually my energy level is at its lowest, so if the boat is safe, I will try to catch a 2.5 hour nap until sunrise- doesn't always happen as something often needs attention- but getting one decent block of sleep at least once in a 24 hour period is important to keep my brain and body strong. Target is 4.5 hours sleep per day.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  8. #18
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    Latest Update from Joe & Team:
    Status updated: 23 hrs and 4 mins ago
    (Sun, January 24 @ 13:50:34)

    Hello Friends-

    Happy Sunday to all-

    It has been quite exciting out here at the bottom of the Indian Ocean and/or the top of the Southern Ocean, where the westerly winds and cold fronts just keep rolling through. Last night it blew between 30 and 40k all night, and luckily I had not much sail up (3 reefs and the staysail), so the boat rode through it Ok, although the big seas throw the boat around a lot. I heard from Commanders Weather yesterday that Tropical Cyclone Corentin is brewing to the north of me off Madagascar, packing winds of 80 to 100 mph, so was advised to head East and South as fast as my little legs would carry me. Yes Sir. I think I have been averaging well over 9 knots over the last 3-4 days and it feels like I am in a rhythm with the weather systems and the boat. Lots of sail changes, but I like the work-out and it helps tire me out- which is good- as too much sitting around produces anxiety.

    In other breaking news aboard GS2, I finished Neil Young's autobiography, "Waging Heavy Peace" and thought it was- in the words of Richard Sherman- highly mediocre. Though I love his music, this rambling, disorganized tale bounced around aimlessly in time, and literally seemed like he wrote it or dictated it in random spare moments as he drove or flew or whatever. Anyway, it’s always great to hear how crazy a musician's life is, as it makes the rest of us look tame by comparison with our minor addictions and bad habits. These guys went big and many of them died young. A fun read for me, but not one I would recommend unless you are a huge Neil Young fan.

    I made some fresh water from salt water today- I know- it's a miracle- and ran the engine for the first time in a week or more just to keep away the gremlins. The hydro-solar combo has met all our energy needs, but there will come a calm day with no sun when the diesel beast will be needed so need to keep her tuned up. All good.

    I woke up this morning after a good sleep despite the raging winds and had my morning coffee and went on deck all fired up to put more sail up and put The Doors on my iPhone and launched into yet another crazed bout of howling and tears and air guitar maelstrom. WTF I ask you. I can't seem to play any music now without sobbing- I feel like frickin' John Boehner. In college, my Brown lacrosse teammates and I were way into The Doors, and we played them incessantly to get psyched for games and to party. L.A. Woman was our theme song... and it still sends a shiver down my spine. So a shout-out to the multi-generations of Brown State Lacrosse Nation- and Coach Lars Tiffany- my heart is with you as the spring season approaches.




    I have also been futzing endlessly with time-speed- distance to the finish calculations and have the following estimates to report:

    Estimated total voyage time at sea:
    134 days- assuming no further stops or major problems (shhh that would "unofficially" break the record, but were not gonna talk about that right now- Ok?)

    So halfway would be 67 days: Feb 1- A national holiday will be declared in the Kerguelen Islands
    Around the bottom of New Zealand: Around Feb. 12
    Around Cape Horn: Around March 3
    Back to Newport: Around April 4 - 8

    Looks so simple and easy sitting there on a piece of paper doesn't it? I hope by putting this out there I am not inviting any bad luck- I am more hoping that everyone will again climb on board the Kharma Bus for a sustained ride to the finish line! And a large Par-Tay! So send the positive vibrations… they will make it down here.

    Go Pats!

    Cheers
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  9. #19
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    The Half Way Mark



    Hello Friends-

    As I approach both Cape Leeuwin, Australia and the chronological estimated half-way point of the journey on Monday Feb 1 (Day 67), I am also facing a building gale right in front of me. I was first warned of this yesterday by Commanders Weather who advised me to "Slow Down!" so that the storm would have time to weaken before I got to it. I was initially bummed at this advice because I was going along very fast- say 10-13k- with surfs up into the higher teens- and was gobbling up the mileage. However, when I sat down at my nav table and pulled down a 4-day GRIB weather file and saw the storm, I quickly realized what they were talking about and the wisdom of their advice. Thank goodness for their "eyes in the sky" broader vision of the weather world- I am very lucky to have them looking out for me.

    So I took down the staysail this morning and put up the orange storm jib (see photo) for the first time in a long time and tucked the third reef into the mainsail and slowed the boat to about 7.5k. When I run my routing now at 50% of normal expected speed, it shows the worst of the storm (i.e. winds of 50 knots or greater) blowing itself out just before I get to it, so I am looking at 35 to 40k instead of 50-plus. Huge difference. Really hope that is the case.

    So now I am holed up in the cabin for the next two days as it is already blowing 30k and will continue to do so for the next 48 hours. So lots of reading, drinking hot tea, and anxiously looking out the cabin windows as the seas build and we get bashed around by the waves. Squalls roll through periodically and the wind increases and a driving, pelting rain falls, which makes it feel like you are going through the car wash having punched the "deluxe clean" option.

    I suit up in my foul weather gear every 2 or 3 hours and go out to check on everything, trim the sails, raise or lower the hydro-generators and do a few exercises to get warm and relieve the cabin fever. It is an interesting existence. I am reading a good book called, "All the Light We Cannot See" about World War 2 in Germany and the occupation of France, and one of the characters tells of being shut inside a house for four months in occupied St. Malo, hiding from the Germans. So I guess things could be worse...

    So I hope you all are getting outside and enjoying the snow (if you have some) and getting some exercise. My time is steadily improving in the 40 foot dash from the bow to the stern, but I could use a little more runway! I will report again once the storm passes on Monday night.

    Cheers
    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  10. #20
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    False Alarm







    Latest Update
    Latest Update from Joe & Team:
    Status updated: 3 hrs and 46 mins ago
    (Thu, February 4 @ 08:38:57)

    Hello Friends-

    I think where I left off last was with the approaching gale and me in "yellow flag" mode, slowing to let the gale go past. So that strategy worked well and while I did see winds over 40k, I did not get the 70k winds that were not far away, so I felt good that between Commanders Weather and my weather/routing we devised a strategy that worked. So I passed the longitude of Cape Leeuwin, Australia, one of the "Great Capes" on Tuesday and have been humming along since then in very good conditions with North-Westerly winds in the 20's which allows me to sail on port gybe at a wind angle of about 130', which is perfect for this boat.

    The next milestone is getting past the longitude of the South East Cape of Tasmania, which is about 900 miles ahead. After that the target is Stewart Island at the Southern tip of New Zealand, which is about 1,750 miles, so I am targeting Feb. 12 or 13 as an ETA, at a 9 knot average boat speed and continued favorable wind direction. Good stuff.

    So I had a weird incident yesterday, as I was sitting in the cabin reading around mid-day my time, I picked up my iPhone to check text messages from the YB tracker system, and there was a message from my wife Kim asking if I was Ok as my EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) had been triggered and sent a message to the world-wide sea-air rescue network and Kim had been contacted by both the US Coast Guard and the Australian Rescue Center to see if my EPIRB alert was real or a false alarm.

    Holy Cow- I had no idea... so I crawled to the back of the boat to a locker in the port stern quarter and found my "ditch bag" of emergency supplies, which had one of my EPIRB's in a front pocket. The bag had somehow been flipped over and was upside down, causing the EPIRB to be pressed into the floor, which accidentally pushed the "ON" button and the EPIRB was flashing and transmitting an emergency signal of distress. So I flipped the bag back over and pushed and held the "on" button on the EPIRB, which de-activated the signal.

    However, the signal had been transmitting for about 90 minutes already, so Kim had been called by the U.S. Coast Guard at 3:00 AM, asking if she knew me and if I was really in distress? Since we had been emailing only a couple of hours ago and the tracker showed the boat moving in the right direction at 10 knots, Kim told them she thought I was OK but would check and get back to them. She then called and emailed a team of 6 experienced mariners I had put together before my departure to handle "emergency communications", and all waited to hear back from me. I was shocked to get the message that the EPIRB was on, so quickly relayed to Kim that there was no emergency- everything was fine on board GS2- and to please tell the U.S. and Australian sea-air rescue teams to stand down.

    I then called Kim on my sat phone which had not been functioning well, but I took the Iridium phone out of its cradle and brought it on deck and- lo and behold- it got a signal and connected the call! Kim was obviously relieved to hear that everything was OK and this was a false alarm, but it was 3:00 in the morning and she had been dealing with this for two hours and she was understandably a bit stressed! Luckily our Emergency Comms team had responded- the world-wide COSPAS-SARSAT sea air rescue system that the EPIRB alert triggers had responded rapidly and efficiently and everyone was ready to assist- which was awesome.

    So on we go- I feel badly for the accidental triggering of the EPIRB (it is now in a "Pelican" waterproof case with lots of padding) and the stress it placed on Kim and my team as well as the international sea-air rescue system, but the good news was that everything worked as it was supposed to, which gives me confidence that were I to have a real emergency, the people, systems and technology are in place to effect a rescue. Thank you to all involved.

    More news in a few days... hopefully it will be boring… and Happy Birthday to my Mom, Katrina Parson- who turns 79 today!

    From 46' South- below the Great Australian Bight-

    Joe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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