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Thread: 2017 - 2018 Volvo Ocean Race

  1. #21
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    Southern Spars Named Rig Supplier Of Volvo Ocean Race




    Southern Spars, the world’s leading carbon fibre spar manufacturer, will be the official supplier of the full rig package for the One Design Volvo Ocean 65 fleet for a second consecutive race, a move that strengthens the Auckland-based company’s historic ties with sailing’s toughest team challenge.

    Southern Spars have been supplying spars to Volvo Ocean Race podium finishers since 1989-90 when Sir Peter Blake secured a commanding victory on Steinlager 2.

    They will again supply the high modulus masts, high modulus racing box boom and a full EC6 bundled carbon fibre rod rigging package with deflected backstays for the Volvo Ocean 65 fleet.

    The Volvo Ocean 65 masts measure 30.30m (99.4 ft) – about the same height as a 10-storey building. The mast is one of the most dynamic and complex components on a Volvo Ocean 65 as it transfers all of the power generated by the wind and sails to the boat.

    Within one-design rules, all 10 rigs (for the eight Volvo Ocean 65s, plus two spares) must be identical in terms of dimensions, weight and stiffness. Southern Spars’ robust production processes guarantee this.




    Nick Bice, Chief Technical Development Officer at the Volvo Ocean Race said: “We can 100% rely on Southern Spars for their delivery of the One Design masts and combined with their service support as the teams race around the planet, we are in the best hands possible.”

    Southern Spars have made rigs for 38 Volvo Ocean Race teams over the years and there’s a good reason why they are the leaders in their field today.

    Steve Wilson, Senior Designer at Southern Spars, explains: “Some of the materials we use here, like Thin Ply Technology (TPT), is exclusive to Southern Spars and that allowed us a lot of flexibility in the design, to strengthen the masts where they need to be stronger, lower the stresses and basically just make a safer product for the guys on the water.”

    The rigs: a fact file

    Within one-design rules, all rigs must be identical in terms of dimensions, weight and stiffness. The first 11 rigs to be bend-tested for the 2014-15 race showed a discrepancy of just 1.4mm across the board. The weight of the masts, as they were delivered to the boats, varied by just 1.35kg from heaviest to lightest – that’s a difference of 0.32%. The centre of gravities of the masts varied by just 0.2%.





    The deck-stepped mast has a tube length of 28.4m and is built from High Modulus Carbon Fibre. It was designed in-house by Southern Spars using the DesMan and RigCalc software packages, integrated with the North Sails design software.The two companies have a long history of collaborating on masts and sails to achieve the ultimate above the deck package and this process produces the most integrated rig package possible, with the mast and sails performing in concert to produce the optimum shape and drive at all times.

    Structurally, there are 202 pieces of Carbon Fibre pre-preg in each mast tube, with an additional 52 patches of structural reinforcement. Southern Spars’ manufacture process, which includes the use of accurately placed ultra-thin layers of carbon, allows designers to be extremely precise with the placement and orientation of fibre, leading to the lightest yet most structurally sound masts available.

    The Volvo Ocean 65 sports a 7.68m racing box boom again built from high modulus carbon and weighing 68kgs. Its deep section provides maximum stiffness to weight efficiency and provides extra downwind sail area. With internal locks at the outboard end of the boom, reefing is made efficient for the crew to manage in strong winds.

    The rigging consists of nine separate stays and is constructed from intermediate modulus carbon fibre, with main stays that have a 26-ton minimum break load. The ECsix carbon rigging is four times lighter than comparative nitronic steel rigging.

    It has a multistrand construction based on a bundle of small rods for safety, durability, longevity and flexibility in the toughest conditions. ECsix cables are the most resilient rigging product on the planet. Their patented construction makes them immune to compression failures, crack propagation and highly resistant to impact and abrasion.

    It has a multistrand construction based on a bundle of small rods for safety, durability, longevity and flexibility in the toughest conditions. ECsix cables are the most resilient rigging product on the planet. Their patented construction makes them immune to compression failures, crack propagation and highly resistant to impact and abrasion.
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    Liz Wardley's Inside Track



    Having clocked up over 80,000 miles sailing on a One Design Volvo Ocean 65 over the last three and a half years, it's fair to say that Liz Wardley knows this boat inside out. Probably better than anyone else on the planet.

    Not content with completing the 2014-15 edition of the race onboard all-female campaign Team SCA, she now spends her days taking them apart, and then re-building them, as part of The Boatyard's extensive re-fit process...


    Quite the CV. So with just 229 days until the start of the next edition, will we see this elite sailor and boat captain – with two Volvo Ocean Races under her belt – make a third lap of the planet? We caught up with Liz to find out about life after the Volvo Ocean Race, the re-fit challenge, and the future.
    Liz – thanks for catching up with us. It seems like life is pretty busy for you right now! What have you been up to in the Boatyard?

    After the last race, I decided pretty immediately that I wanted to do the race again. I didn’t necessarily want to be part of an all-female team again as I’d already done two campaigns, so I thought, if I’m going to stand a chance of getting on a guys team, or a mixed team, then I had to make myself super-skilled. I asked Nick Bice (Chief Technical Development Officer) if I could be part of the re-fit process, because I wanted to learn this boat inside out, in the hopes of making myself indispensable for the next race. I’ve always loved playing around with boats so it seemed like a natural fit. During the re-fit process, there are two of us boat captains, so we make sure that everything is ready at the right time as the boats go through the bays, and then when it comes to the commissioning phase we make everything come together and ensure that everyone is on schedule. Alongside that I’m working in the engineering department, which is really interesting in terms of the technical aspects which go into these boats.


    Do you enjoy working in the Boatyard? It’s a really cool facility down there…

    I’m primarily a sailor, but if I wasn’t doing that, then this would be pretty much my dream job. The team in Lisbon is really high-end, we have the best of each area in the world working here. It’s a very fun place to be. Everyone is super passionate about the Volvo Ocean Race and you don’t need a lot of motivation to get out of bed in the morning. We’re under a lot of pressure and the schedule is really tight, especially during the commissioning phase when teams start to arrive and breathe down your neck about getting things turned around. Everyone is super professional and we’re getting fine-tuned at it now. We’ve got the last boat in Bay 1 and we’ve got the second completed boat going in the water this week.


    You’ve spent more time on the Volvo Ocean 65s than anyone else in the world. Any ideas how many hours you’ve now spent either onboard, or around, these boats?

    Wow. That's a good question. I'm not sure on hours, but I can guess the miles. I joined SCA a year before the race, then sailed the race, and since then I've been doing deliveries, then sailing a Volvo Ocean 65 every day in Gothenburg at Volvo HQ where we clocked up over 4,000 miles in five months. Now, I'm around them every day – I'd say around 80,000 miles!



    Have you learned anything you didn’t already know during the re-fit process?

    Definitely. We all had a specific area to take responsibility for during the Team SCA campaign, and I was looking after the engineering side of things there. In my role as boat captain at the Boatyard, I’m involved in a little bit of everything, so I’m really broadening my horizons in terms of knowledge and skills around the boat. There were areas that I was responsible for during the 2014-15 race which I know a hell of a lot better now. It gives you a lot more confidence making decisions prior to a leg start.

    Your main focus remains trying to get back in the race as a sailor – how is that going?

    I’m in a good position being on the inside of things – as the rumours build I am contacting different people to see if there are any opportunities. I did a bit of sailing with one of the teams, but that wasn’t a trial, it was just a delivery. I’ve had a few replies saying it’s all dependant on budget, or key markets, so there have been some mixed responses, but nothing overwhelmingly positive as yet.


    That must be tough – is it tough to keep positive?

    I definitely haven’t lost faith. I’m living, breathing and working everything Volvo Ocean Race, so I have a very big will and drive to do the race. Make no mistake, I love my job in the Boatyard, but I want to be on that start line in October.

    What would your message be to potential teams looking for a female sailor?

    I think it would be pretty easy to lose hope, but I haven’t. I’m not just sitting here living in hope and waiting for a call, I’m working as hard as I can to be in the right place at the right time. I know that even though I’ve spent a lot of time on the boat and know it inside out, I’m not as experienced in offshore sailing as some of the guys who might be getting picked up. There are tons of awesome female sailors out there, but you’ve also got to fit the profile of what people are looking for.




    How does the transition from boat captain to sailor work? At what point do you need to make the mental and physical switch to compete in the race – is there a cut-off?

    I haven’t stopped training since the last race. I’ve been lucky that my schedule has involved sailing a lot on these boats, and also a lot of physical work. I have a degree in Physical Training, so I know what to do to keep myself in check. I’m actually training more now than I was on the lead up to the last race with Team SCA. Our personal trainer from the SCA campaign, Santi, actually helped me through my Physical Training course, so we’ve been in touch a lot, and, given the benchmark training we were doing prior to the 2014-15 start, I’m at the same level. I think the fitness is slightly down, but the strength is up, so I’m confident that I could integrate into a mixed team pretty easily.


    Has been involved in the Boatyard opened your eyes to the scale and quality of what they do?

    I feel that the Boatyard was massively underestimated last race. Everything from the planning, to the prep, to actually pulling it off, is pretty impressive. I definitely think we were a bit sheltered as sailors during the last race. I hadn’t seen it all in action before I got there – and I think that anyone who walks through the facility and sees how everything is going on would be seriously impressed. If anyone has any kind of concerns or issues putting their trust in the Boatyard, they can rest easy. It’s a very smooth process.

    Talk us through the strict adherence to the one-design rules, it’s quite an in-depth process with very small margins, isn’t it?

    Between the boats coming into the shed and getting completely stripped, from what we call Bay 1, to the point where they’re re-weighed just before branding, every single item is taken off the boat, right down to the washers, so that when the boat goes back in the water you know exactly what’s the same. We took off 600-odd items, and had a 10-page scope of work listing all the different details, complete with photos and illustrations. We weigh the boats under a very strict protocol prior to their branding, and they’re closer than they were after coming out of construction.


    During the race, several Team SCA sailors mentioned that sometimes you just lacked a little experience and it would have been nice to have someone to tell you whether to push a bit harder, or ease off. Have you learned any life hacks or shortcuts around the boat during this process?

    I definitely have found little things popping up. We’ve done a lot of deliveries and tried new things, which is really helpful. Sometimes you think, why didn’t we try this earlier? You never stop learning, even in one-design boats.

    http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/new...-Ocean-65.html
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  3. #23
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    Dutch Team AkzoNobel Get The New Boat

    8 March 2017

    Team AkzoNobel to race brand new Volvo Ocean 65 in Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18

    ALICANTE, Spain, March 8 – Team AkzoNobel will compete in the 2017-18 edition of the Volvo Ocean Race in a brand new boat.






    ALICANTE, Spain, March 8 – Team AkzoNobel will compete in the 2017-18 edition of the Volvo Ocean Race in a brand new boat.

    Team AkzoNobel, led by Dutch skipper Simeon Tienpont, will tackle sailing’s toughest team test in the new Volvo Ocean 65 currently being constructed at Persico Marine in Bergamo, Italy.

    The boat, scheduled for completion in May, is identical to the current one-design fleet of seven Volvo Ocean 65s which competed in the 2014-15 edition.

    Tienpont, who made the team’s milestone announcement on Wednesday at the HISWA Amsterdam Boatshow, said: “Team AkzoNobel is a brand-new team being built from the ground up – so a brand-new boat feels right.

    “Every new boat is exciting, but this one is something special. It doesn’t seem very long since I started planning out this campaign on my kitchen table at home, so it’s a great feeling to now see our boat coming to fruition.”

    Explaining the motivation behind the decision to commission the build of the new boat, he said: “Our goal is to be the best prepared team on the start line in Alicante, so, our first choice was always to have a new boat built.




    “If you have that option, it’s a no-brainer decision to make when you are racing around the world.”

    And Tienpont, a double-America’s Cup winner who has twice raced the Volvo Ocean Race before, onboard ABN Amro Two in 2005-06 and Team Vestas Wind in 2014-15, admitted to having butterflies in his stomach when he first laid eyes on the new boat.

    “My wife thinks it’s crazy but I always have a special bond with the boats that I race,” he confessed. “Just like some people bond with the horse that they ride or their pet dog, I relate emotionally to the boat that I race.”




    The existing fleet is currently undergoing a one-million-euros-per-boat re-fit procedure at The Boatyard in Lisbon, Portugal.

    The new boat, which has been constructed using the same materials and moulds as the rest of the fleet, will shortly be transported to Lisbon, where it will undergo rigorous testing to ensure it adheres to the strict one-design criteria.

    “We have a christening ceremony planned in the Netherlands for the summer,” Tienpont said. “Bringing our boat home for the first time will be an exciting moment and an opportunity for our Dutch supporters to see it.

    “The Volvo Ocean Race is hugely popular in the Netherlands. In the same way that the French public loves the Vendée Globe, the Dutch are crazy about the Volvo Ocean Race. As a Dutchman, I’m immensely proud to be skippering a Dutch Volvo Ocean Race campaign.”

    Nick Bice, Chief Technical Development Officer at the Volvo Ocean Race, has overseen the re-fit process of the existing Volvo Ocean 65s, and is delighted to see an extra boat joining the fleet.

    “It’s hugely exciting to expand the fleet ahead of the next edition,” he said. “Team AkzoNobel signed up early in the cycle, so they had time to build a new boat, and it will be a great benefit to them in terms of their brand fit.”

    He added: “The new boat will be identical to the existing fleet in every regard. All of the Volvo Ocean 65s were built to race in at least two editions, and the seven that finished the 2014-15 edition are in fantastic condition.

    “You won’t be able to tell the difference between the brand new boat, and one of the old ones,” he added. “And there is no reason why an existing boat, sailed properly, cannot win the next Volvo Ocean Race.”

    The Volvo Ocean Race starts from Alicante on 22 October 2017 and finishes in The Hague in the summer of 2018. The teams will complete a course of around 45,000 nautical miles, visiting a total of 12 Host Cities around the world.
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    Dongfeng Welcomes Female Power Duo

    Top female sailors Carolijn Brouwer and Marie Riou join Dongfeng Race Team for Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18

    Dongfeng Race Team have selected Carolijn Brouwer and Marie Riou for their Volvo Ocean Race campaign in 2017-18 – a move that confirms the impact of a rule change introduced by the race to encourage mixed male-female crews




    Dongfeng Race Team have selected Carolijn Brouwer and Marie Riou for their Volvo Ocean Race campaign in 2017-18 – a move that confirms the impact of a rule change introduced by the race to encourage mixed male-female crews.

    The two women bring a wealth of experience to Charles Caudrelier’s team, including a total of five Olympic Games and a host of world titles. They join Jérémie Beyou, Stu Bannatyne and Daryl Wislang, who were announced last week as the first of the campaign’s crew for 2017-18.

    Brouwer, 43, is one of the Netherlands’ most respected athletes and a two-time Volvo Ocean Race veteran, having competed with Amer Sports Too in 2001-02 and Team SCA in 2014-15. She is also a former World Sailor of the Year and a three-time Olympian.

    She is joined by France’s Riou, 35, who has competed twice at the Olympics, including Rio 2016, and has won four world championships in the Nacra 17 class.

    The pair have been selected following an extensive programme of evaluation which included sailing and racing, both inshore and offshore, in Australia and Portugal.

    Caudrelier, who will skipper Dongfeng again after securing third place in 2014-15, is delighted with the addition of what he describes as two exceptionally gifted female sailors.

    “I chose Carolijn because she beat us many times during the last race when she helmed Team SCA in the In-Port Races,” he explained. “We all knew that she is a good helm and she has a big Olympic past and I really respect that. But her Olympic campaigns have turned her into a very fast driver and she knows where to put the boat.”

    He added that Riou’s years of Olympic racing and training would be of great benefit to his squad.

    “She is a very good Olympic sailor with tons of experience. She is also from Brittany so she has a background in offshore sailing. She is strong, she has a good spirit – which is the most important thing for me – and she is used to sailing with guys. For her, the Volvo Ocean Race is a dream and, like Carolijn, Marie wants to win.”

    The selection of Brouwer and Riou is the first sign that the rule change, brought in by the Volvo Ocean Race in order to encourage female sailors who might otherwise be overlooked due to a perceived lack of physical strength or experience, will have a significant impact across the sport.

    Under the new crew rules, all-male teams will be limited to just seven sailors but teams that include female sailors will be able to choose from combinations including seven men plus one or two women; five men plus five women; or 11 women.

    Brouwer says that winning the Volvo Ocean Race has been a goal for many years, and she is delighted to be joining a Chinese team which she admired during the last race.

    “I’m very proud to be part of the team,” Brouwer said. “One of the reasons I wanted to join Dongfeng Race Team is because of their strong team spirit. The Volvo Ocean Race is unique. It’s the ultimate challenge physically and mentally and, because you are in a team, you get the best out of each other.”

    Riou will be making her debut in the race. “I’ve wanted to take part in the Volvo Ocean Race since I was 10 years old,” she said. “Although my main experience is in inshore racing, I have always wanted to race offshore and for me the Volvo Ocean Race is the pinnacle of fully-crewed offshore racing.”

    The announcement of the remaining crew members of Dongfeng Race Team will be made in the coming weeks.

    Dongfeng are one of three teams to have announced campaigns for the race so far, along with Team AkzoNobel (Netherlands) and MAPFRE (Spain). A fourth team is confirmed and will be announced in late March, with the others to come in the following weeks and months.

    The race will start from Alicante on 22 October and visit Lisbon, Cape Town, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auckland, Itajaí, Newport RI, Cardiff and Gothenburg, before the big finish in The Hague at the end of June.



    Sailor: Carolijn Brouwer

    Born: 25 July 1973

    Place of birth: Leiden, Netherlands

    Previous Volvo Ocean Races: 2

    Achievements: three-time Olympian and multiple world champion






    Sailor: Marie Riou

    Born: 21 August 1981

    Place of birth: Plougastel-Daoulas, France

    Achievements: two-time Olympian and four-time world champion
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    Vestas Partners With 11th Hour For Volvo Campaign

    Vestas 11th Hour Racing launch Volvo Ocean Race campaign with sustainability message





    Vestas are returning to the Volvo Ocean Race for a second consecutive edition, after launching their 2017-18 campaign in partnership with 11th Hour Racing at simultaneous events in Newport, Rhode Island and Aarhus – where it was also announced that the fleet will make a 'fly by' of the Danish city on the final leg


    Vestas are returning to the Volvo Ocean Race for a second consecutive edition, after launching their 2017-18 campaign in partnership with 11th Hour Racing at simultaneous events in Newport, Rhode Island and Aarhus – where it was also announced that the fleet will make a ‘fly by’ of the Danish city on the final leg.

    Vestas 11th Hour Racing will be led by the American duo of Charlie Enright and Mark Towill. The team are the fourth to announce for the upcoming edition, which begins on 22 October, and they will use the race to promote a sustainability message around the world.




    Enright and Towill had their first Volvo Ocean Race experience as skipper and Team Director of Team Alvimedica in 2014-15.

    “It’s an exciting time,” said Enright. “We’ve achieved a strong collective of sponsors, and the boat has now been refitted and branded in Lisbon, waiting for us to get over there and get it out on the water.

    “We’re working hard on building a competitive team ahead of the race, and have a couple of transatlantic sailings lined up for April and May.”

    The Vestas 11th Hour Racing campaign is a unique platform for Vestas to promote its vision, which is to be the global leader in sustainable energy solutions.

    “The Volvo Ocean Race is a proven platform for Vestas and a unique strategic fit to promote our new vision and market-leading energy solutions in our key markets and engage with customers,” said Vestas President and CEO Anders Runevad.




    It’s also an ideal fit for 11th Hour Racing, a programme of The Schmidt Family Foundation which establishes strategic partnerships within the sailing and marine communities to promote systemic change for the health of our marine environment.

    “Our partnership with 11th Hour Racing sends a very strong signal with two leading players within sustainability combining forces to promote sustainable solutions within wind and water,” added Runevad.

    Wendy Schmidt, 11th Hour Racing Co-Founder and President of The Schmidt Family Foundation, said: “Mark and Charlie have been serving as ambassadors for 11th Hour Racing for the past two years, having witnessed first hand during the last Volvo Ocean Race the many ways pollution and plastic debris are destroying ocean life and threatening all of us. Our partnership with Vestas is about inspiring positive change in the way we think about energy and the natural resources of the planet.”

    Vestas competed in 2014-15 as Team Vestas Wind – running aground on Leg 2 and rebuilding the boat against all odds to make a landmark return in Lisbon at the start of Leg 8.

    This is only the second time in the Race’s history, and the first since 1993-94, that three major team sponsors have returned for a second consecutive Race – with Vestas, Dongfeng and MAPFRE all back on the start line. Team AkzoNobel take the total number of confirmed teams to four with seven months still to go to the start of the race.

    The Volvo Ocean Race also revealed that a mark of the course will ensure the fleet will sail close to Dokk1 in Aarhus on the final leg of the 2017-18 race between Gothenburg and The Hague – giving the people of the city a great view of the competing teams on their One Design Volvo Ocean 65s.

    “The teams will be on their final leg after racing 45,000 miles and to round the mark off Aarhus will be a great challenge for the fleet, who I’m sure will receive a welcome boost from the Danish public,” said Mark Turner, Volvo Ocean Race CEO. “Denmark has a great history with this race already and today another chapter is written as Aarhus is added to the course.”

    Twenty-five Danish sailors have competed in the race to date and two teams have raced under the Danish flag – SAS Baia Viking in 1985-86 and Team Vestas Wind in 2014-15. Vestas 11th Hour Racing will sail under Danish and American flags.

    "This will be a great experience for visitors and citizens alike – and will bring wide international attention to Aarhus that will benefit the city's growth and development," said Aarhus Mayor Jacob Bundsgaard.

    The teams will depart Alicante on 22 October and race 45,000 nautical miles around the world with stops at Lisbon, Cape Town, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auckland, Itajaí, Newport, Cardiff and Gothenburg before the finish in The Hague.

    The One Design concept has reduced the need for campaigns to announce as early as in previous editions and there is no reason why a campaign getting off the ground this summer can't go on and win the trophy.





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    Mapfre Dismasts During Practice

    MAPFRE's boat dismasts during offshore testing in Spain
    There are no injuries and the boat and team have returned to their base in Sanxenxo





    MAPFRE's boat dismasted today during offshore testing in Spain.
    The incident happened at 17:15hrs local time on*Thursday afternoon while the team was sailing about seven nautical miles SW of the island of Ons (Pontevedra) near their home base of Sanxenxo.




    The conditions were around 25 knots of wind and four meter high waves. MAPFRE's mast broke below the first spreader.





    We will have to analyse the data and the damaged parts in order to draw a conclusion
    Pablo Arrarte

    "There was a crash and then the rig started to fall to starboard," explained Pablo Arrarte, MAPFRE’s watch captain who was sailing as skipper of the boat during this period of testing.




    "We were sailing on quite a comfortable reach with waves also from the same direction and so at the moment we do not know why it has broken. We will have to analyse the data and the damaged parts in order to draw a conclusion."
    The crew have not suffered any injuries and after fully checking for any collateral damage to other parts of the boat it took around two hours of intense work to secure the boat and recover the broken parts of the mast and the sails.






    The team's emergency protocol was activated immediately and for safety reasons, Salvamento Marítimo [Maritime Rescue] was notified. They monitored the Spanish team's Volvo Ocean 65 and when the crew had secured the boat the emergency services were duly informed that the crew were heading back to Sanxenxo under their own means.*
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  7. #27
    Oh crap, there are only so many Volvo sticks to go around and west marine doesn't stock them.................

  8. #28
    I guess its better to test the sticks limits before the actual racing begins.

  9. #29
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    Back In Two Weeks





    MAPFRE will be back sailing in just over two weeks, with a new rig already on its way and the team eager to get back in training following the dismasting of their Volvo Ocean 65 on Thursday.

    The crew have been meeting with Volvo Ocean Race's Chief Technical Development Officer, Nick Bice, and Head of the Boatyard, Neil Cox, in Sanxenxo to investigate the incident and make a plan to get the team back on the water as soon as possible.

    That will be in remarkably quick time, with the new mast due to arrive in Lisbon as early as Thursday, 6 April. The boat should be relaunched by 14 April and the team should be sailing again by Monday, 17 April.

    "We're keen to identify what exactly happened during the incident, and that process is ongoing, but the vibe around the team base is very positive," explained Bice. "The guys know that their next sailing session which was planned for the 17th is still scheduled."

    The guys know that their next sailing session which was planned for the 17th is still scheduled

    Nick Bice
    Bice confirmed that the rigging had undergone stringent testing before leaving The Boatyard in Lisbon. "We conducted non-destructive testing on the mast, which was from last edition and had sailed approximately 70,000 miles, including taking an ultrasound of the mast to ensure no anomalies, and testing the rigging," he continued.



    © Ugo Fonolla/MAPFRE/Volvo Ocean R


    Timeline for MAPFRE's new rig:

    Sunday 2 April – MAPFRE's boat delivered to Lisbon

    Thursday 6/Friday 7 April – New rig arrives in Lisbon

    Friday 14 April – New rig stepped/boat re-launched

    Monday 17 April – MAPFRE begins sailing again
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    The Boat Is Revealed



    It's time for our big reveal! How do you like the look of this VO65? It's almost time for Vestas 11th Hour Racing to start on-water training. We have a busy agenda leading up to leg start in Alicante in October. More from Mark and Charlie soon when they arrive in Lisbon in mid-April to set off on our first journey
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