Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 57

Thread: IDEC Sport 2016-2017 Jules Verne Record Attempt

  1. #31
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1

    Stretching The Lead



    IDEC SPORT INCREASES HER LEAD
    3 January 2017
    The IDEC SPORT maxi-trimaran is continuing to extend her lead over the Jules Verne Trophy title-holder. At the end of their eighteenth day of racing, Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Clément Surtel, Gwénolé Gahinet, Bernard Stamm and Sébastien Audigane now have a lead of 680 miles, which is more or less the equivalent of a day’s sailing. Their straight trajectory on the port tack is now turning slightly towards the south. They are still sailing in powerful winds, but these have come around to the north and are on the beam. Speeds remain high at more than 32 knots on the direct route (VMG). This pace should allow Joyon and his men to pass under Tasmania in the next 24 hours and enter the Pacific.




    At more than 53 degrees S, they need to watch out for ice, but fortunately there are clear skies offering good visibility, which they have not had since crossing the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope. Pleased about the two intermediate records achieved yesterday, Ushant – Cape Leeuwin (17 days, 06 hours and 59 minutes) and Cape Agulhas – Cape Leeuwin (4 days, 09 hours and 37 minutes), Joyon’s gang are not resting on their laurels. They are set to see their names enter the record books for the passage off Tasmania tomorrow and the International date Line, probably on Friday, before looking ahead and dreaming of the Horn.




    TRACKER


    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  2. #32
    Now1,038 nm in advance!

  3. #33
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1

    The 1/2 Way Point In 20 Days




    IDEC SPORT AT THE HALFWAY POINT IN LESS THAN 20 DAYS

    4 January 2017

    The IDEC SPORT maxi-trimaran will this evening complete the first half of the round the world voyage. It will be around 1800hrs UTC that they will have sailed the 11,160 theoretical miles representing half of the total distance between Ushant and Ushant via the three major capes, Good Hope, Leeuwin and the Horn. Joyon and his men swallowed up this first half at an average speed of 24.2 knots. In reality they have sailed 13,200 miles out on the water, at the incredible average speed of 28.7 knots.

    At the start of their nineteenth day of racing, as they approach New Zealand, this performance places them 1060 miles ahead of the title-holder of the Jules Verne Trophy, Banque Populaire V. As they begin to tackle the world’s biggest ocean, the Pacific, there is a strange problem for Joyon and his band of soldiers. How can they slow down a boat that is eager to speed across the ocean? They need to look after the boat and there is the fear of going faster than the low-pressure system and ending up in calms. This today means that Joyon, Audigane, Pella, Surtel, Stamm and Gahinet are reining in their machine.




    “We have set up a system rather like the points on your licence,” joked the Catalan Alex Pella. Tossed around by a nasty swell hitting the boat side on for the past 48 hours, Francis Joyon’s crew have to put the brakes on their IDEC SPORT maxi-trimaran. “It is something of a paradox,” continued Francis. “We are trying to smash speed records, but in the past 48 hours, we have been trying to find ways to slow the boat down and look after her.” The unprecedented performance of the VPLP designed boat from 2005 must not stop us from thinking about the violence of the elements, which after 19 days, including eight at unprecedented speeds, has led to some breakages, albeit superficial ones. “The plexiglass screen at the helm did not resist a breaker,” explained almost matter of factly Francis Joyon. “We had to set up a replacement panel to protect the helmsman,” added Gwénolé Gahinet.

    The nasty swell which was hitting the side of IDEC SPORT has now shifted to behind the boat. “Today, we have a very good wind angle with the breeze still at around thirty knots and the seas pushing us along from astern. The helmsman is not getting as wet and the movement of the boat is more comfortable than over the past couple of days,” stressed Francis. All lights are on green, in spite of the many little matters that the crew have to deal with and the start of the huge Pacific is a continuation at the same amazing speeds that they have been keeping up for nine days. “We are dreaming of Cape Horn, and the climb back up to Brazil,” said the youngest member of the crew, Gwénolé Gahinet. “A little bit of sunshine and warmth would do us good.” However getting to the Horn takes a lot of hard work. Francis Joyon thinks there will be a relative slowdown in the Pacific with a series of manoeuvres and gybes to weave in and out of the systems on the edge of the ice zone. This will be a welcome breather, allowing them to carry out a few repairs and inspect the boat.



    TRACKER


    A new intermediate reference time to Tasmania
    After Leeuwin, just two days ago, it is the reference time from Ushant- Tasmania to the SE of Australia, which was smashed in the middle iof last night and taken away from Yann Guichard and Dona Bertarelli’s Spindrift 2 maxi-trimaran by Joyon, Pella, Surtel, Gahinet, Stamm and Audigane. The new time is 18 days, 18 hours and 31 minutes replacing the previous time of 20 days, 4 hours and 37 minutes set last year by the world’s biggest racing trimaran and a crew of fourteen.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  4. #34
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1

    21 Days To International Dateline




    IDEC SPORT AT THE INTERNATIONAL DATE LINE
    5 January 2017

    At the start of their 21st day of racing, Francis Joyon and his elite crew are preparing to leave the low-pressure system that propelled them so far at high speed, allowing them to sail for eleven days on the same tack and to set several records in the Southern Ocean. As they cross theInternational Date Line and move to degrees of longitude West, IDEC SPORT is tackling a transition zone, meaning that a gybe is imminent to join another low heading towards the Cape Horn.

    “We’re already in the Pacific, although it’s hard to grasp. The low that has been with is ggoing to stop here. We’re heading towards the north and then gybing to come down onto another low further ahead,” explained Francis Joyon today with the trimaran heading towards the NE in NW’ly winds that are growing lighter. “We’ve already gone to full sail. We haven’t seen that for a long time. We’ll use the gennaker during the night until we get to the low and hoist the smaller sails again.”




    TRACKER



    At 52° S, 500 miles SE of Stewart Island to the south of New Zealand, they are all enjoying this short breather. “Even if we’re completely confused about the dates and times, and we’re in No Man’s Land, we know we’ll shortly be getting closer to Brest!” added Bernard Stamm. “It’s incredible to have sailed such a straight line. Everything fell into place for us. After this transition zone, we’ll pick up some more wind and get back on a SSE’ly heading. It’s looking good all the way to the Horn, even if we’ll have more manoeuvres to do,” added the Swiss sailor.

    Francis, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Gwénolé Gahinet, Clément Surtel and Sébastien Audigane have stabilised their lead at around 950 miles over the time set by Banque Populaire V five years ago, when she was sailed by a crew of 14.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  5. #35
    Joyon does better in the straight line stuff.

    Gotta stop wiggling the transom.

  6. #36
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1

    Dodging Icebergs In The Dark




    ATTACKING THE DEEP SOUTH
    6 January 2017

    After a rapid crossing of the Indian Ocean – “the most violent and fantastic run in my life as a sailor,” according to Sébastien Audigane, “the craziest sailing I have ever done down by the icebergs, pushing the boat and crew to the limit,” according to Gwénolé Gahinet – the Jules Verne trophy adventure is continuing to go well for the crew of IDEC SPORT. In the remote, desolate waters of the South Pacific, a strategic battle is beginning now for Francis Joyon and his men as they try to match the pace of the weather systems that lie ahead. We can look forward to a race against the clock, with a lot of work in sight as they head towards Cape Horn, with the dials still indicating that they have a lead of more than 820 miles over the record pace.

    Going from one low to another, things have changed somewhat on IDEC SPORT, which has just dealt with a transition zone over the past 24 hours, offering fine weather to dry out the foulies and time for them to recover their breath. While they lost a few miles in the climb north and had their work cut out trying to get to the new wind, this day of rest was very much appreciated by the six men on board. This little break allowed them to do a few odd jobs around the boat and to build up their strength as they look forward to diving down into the most extreme latitudes of the Southern Ocean.




    TRACKER


    Diagonally down into the far south

    “It’s nice having a drier boat, without hundreds of litres crashing down on us all the time and to get some sunshine, see the albatrosses, and some great light,” admitted Francis Joyon, who was pleased this morning after ten or so gybes to have made it to the winds associated with the next low, which were still ahead of them last night.

    The skipper of IDEC SPORT is confident about what lies ahead in the icy waters around the Antarctic and added, “The solution is not as simple as in the Indian Ocean, which was fairly wild with amazing distances covered. The Pacific ahead of us looks quite lively, which is rather good for us. Let’s hope it will be pacific towards us and offer us some decent wind. For now, we’re diving diagonally down towards the south and we’ll soon be at 57° S.”




    Full speed ahead to the Horn

    There is a low they will have to cross and a high blocking their route forcing them to round it via the south down close to the ice limit. This is how the fourth week of racing begins for Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Sébastien Audigane, Gwénolé Gahinet and Clément Surtel, and it promises to be full of surprises and ups and downs in what is a very hostile environment.

    But they are all ready to keep up the pace, as Clément Surtel explained: “We set off hoping to have a great Pacific. We are preparing ourselves to feel cold again, having to wear gloves, hats etc. We are ahead. It’s up to us now to catch the systems at the right time, push the boat when we have to and look after her when we can. Whatever happens, we’ll be giving it our all as we make our way to the Horn!” Bernard Stamm obviously agreed with this sentiment and says he is still amazed by the ability of IDEC SPORT to accelerate and “make the world seem that much smaller”.
    Last edited by Photoboy; 01-06-2017 at 10:01 AM.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  7. #37
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1



    IN POLE POSITION AROUND ANTARCTICA
    7 January 2017

    After a gybe, they’re off again. After a day of being significantly slowed, IDEC SPORT is now on the northern edge of a Southern low with more favourable winds allowing them to step up the pace towards Cape Horn. They now have less than 10,000 miles left to sail and Francis Joyon and his crew are back at high speeds in the South Pacific. This morning at 55°S, they are 950 miles ahead of the record pace in the Jules Verne Trophy and this lead is continuing to increase.

    With a NW’ly wind gusting up to 40 knots on waves that are not as nasty, everything is in place for the red and grey trimaran to sail at speed on the port tack. “We have just gybed. The seas are still a bit confused, but we’re sailing well. The boat is making 30-35 knots without us pushing too hard. The seas will improve as time goes by,” said Francis Joyon at dawn 2700 miles from the Horn.



    TRACKER

    Since 12 pm, Idec Sport again accelerated the pace and displays a speed of progress compared to the goal of 32-33 knots. On the other side of the low pressure center that they just came through, Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Sébastien Audigane, Clément Thisor, Gwenole Gahinet and Bernard Stamm continue to tear down the miles with a formidable effectiveness. After 22 days of racing, at the start of a new run of speed under the hostile latitudes and rough that lead to the Cape Horn, and now they're cavorting on a clear path to the south and wear, this Saturday afternoon, their advance on The table walk from the Jules Verne trophy at 1 150 miles.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  8. #38
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1

    A Slight Pause




    CALMING THINGS DOWN IN THE PACIFIC
    8 January 2017

    At the start of the 24th day of racing in the remote part of the South Pacific, IDEC SPORT has managed to slide under a low and is advancing in a NW’ly breeze blowing at around fifteen knots in calmer seas. While Francis Joyon and his men have slowed down , the pace is still good as they chase after the Jules Verne Trophy.

    “There are several weather hurdles ahead of us,” declared the skipper of the red and grey maxi-trimaran. “The high isn’t too much of a problem as we can get around the south. We won’t be that fast, but will get by. It’s closer to the Horn that we risk finding ourselves without any wind.”

    There has been a slight slow down today, which is a welcome break for the six men on IDEC SPORT, as they make their way towards the Horn, which is around 2000 miles ahead. Because of the weather uncertainties, Francis is unable to give an ETA for the third major cape, but for now he is 1185 miles ahead of the record set by Banque Populaire V.

    “We’re still feeling positive as we approach Cape Horn, which offers us a lot of hope, as we should be well within the record when we round it,” he added as the trimaran continues through the fog and relatively mild weather in the South Pacific at 58°S.




    Tracker




    Almost 1 200 miles ahead of schedule by 59° South ➡ http://bit.ly/2i7fGlh
    It's under the sign of the cold that idec sport track this sunday his way across the pacific in the direction of Cape Horn, distant of 1 800 miles. Francis Joyon and his crew have managed to sneak under a anticyclone that currently a few competitors of the vendée globe, positioned 300 miles further north. On the alert, permanently watch for dodging the threat of bumping into an iceberg and the gates of 60° South, the six men on board do nothing in this extreme navigation. They continue to draw with conviction performing a trajectory that lets you win continuously on the board walk from the Jules Verne trophy. This afternoon, they display an advance which amounts to almost 1 200 miles to the approach of Cape Horn, they could double in the next 3-4 days.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  9. #39
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    8,246
    Blog Entries
    1

    Chasing The Lows




    Down in the Sixties
    9 January 2017

    IDEC SPORT will be rounding Cape Horn in a few days from now, so it might seem odd that they are heading so far south. Aboard the red and grey maxi-trimaran, all lights are green for the crew, which is continuing to extend its lead over the round the world record with an advance of 1270 miles this morning.

    During the night, Francis Joyon and his crew of five carried out a gybe. On the starboard tack, heading SE to pick up some wind allowing them to sail downwind all the way to the exit from the Southern Ocean, there are more gybes ahead.



    Tracker


    “We’ll be staying down at 59° S for some time. We’ll be going even further down depending on how the wind shifts. We’re now aiming for a strip of stronger winds to take us downwind to Cape Horn.We can hope for some wind, but we’re going to have to change tack a lot,” Francis Joyon said yesterday afternoon with IDEC SPORT continuing on her way in cold but manageable conditions below an area of high pressure.




    So it is not surprising to see them dive into the 60s this morning with a good lead over Banque Populaire V, her virtual rival in the Jules Verne Trophy. In a few hours from now, once they have picked up the SW’ly air stream, they can get a bit further north and sail on a zig-zag course to the Horn at 55°58′ S and 1500 miles ahead of them.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  10. #40
    Headed Offshore Cassidy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The boundless seas
    Posts
    142
    Smoking through the back of the IMOCA fleet.

    Good luck to the crew keeping up the pace!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •