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Thread: IDEC Sport 2016-2017 Jules Verne Record Attempt

  1. #41
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    Homing In On Cape Horn



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    CHARGING AHEAD, IDEC SPORT EXTENDS HER LEAD
    10 January 2017

    With less than a thousand miles to go to the Horn, IDEC SPORT is charging ahead towards the third and final major cape in the round the world voyage. In a twenty-knot westerly wind, the six men are pushing hard, foot on the accelerator with a series of gybes in this final stretch in the extreme south. This morning sailing at between the 57th and 58th parallel, Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Sébastien Audigane, Gwénolé Gahinet, Clément Surtel and Bernard Stamm have taken their lead to 1700 miles in this Jules Verne Trophy attempt.

    Extending their lead by 300 miles since yesterday, Francis Joyon is not hiding the fact that he has a few worries about getting around the Cape. He is expecting light winds and even calms, which would slow them down considerably as they prepare to enter the Atlantic. To deal with this area with all its uncertainties, Francis Joyon and the router Marcel van Triest hope to reach the tip of Tierra del Fuego from the north to benefit from a more favourable air stream. This morning after moving to 57°S to avoid encountering an iceberg or growlers, the red and grey trimaran has already moved back up several degrees of latitude with the wind from astern.




    The next 24 hours look tense as they approach the famous cape. The six of them may have clocked up more than fifteen roundings of Cape Horn, but they are all looking forward to getting back to warmer climes and making their way back up the South Atlantic. “This is always a big moment. Our race strategy changes at that moment. We go from what is sometimes close to survival mode to much more comfortable and normal sailing,” explained the skipper of IDEC SPORT, who will be rounding the Cape for the fifth time.
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  2. #42
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    The Horn 4 Days In Advance



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    THE HORN THIS EVENING, FOUR DAYS AHEAD OF THE RECORD PACE
    11 January 2017

    Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Sébastien Audigane, Gwénolé Gahinet and Clément Surtel are about to achieve one of the finest stories in the history of the Jules Verne Trophy. By late today (UTC) they should be able to see the lights of Cape Horn, marking the way out of the Pacific and the entrance into the Atlantic. After shattering the Indian record (4 days, 9 hours and 37 minutes) IDEC SPORT should be rounding the Horn after just 26 days and a few hours. The holder of the Jules Verne Trophy, Banque Populaire V with her crew of fourteen took 30 days 22 hours and 18 minutes to get to the tip of South America.

    IDEC SPORT is advancing with the wind from astern and is having to carry out a series of gybes to find the best angle in strong winds, in order to maintain their high speeds. They will be taking a northerly route to avoid the calms, which are appearing in Drake Passage. A final difficulty before leaving the Southern Ocean and returning to the more hospitable waters of the Atlantic and the climb back up to Ushant.
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  3. #43
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    The New Standard




    IDEC SPORT more than 4 days and 6 hours ahead of the record at the Horn.

    The IDEC SPORT maxi-trimaran skippered by Francis Joyon crossed the longitude of Cape Horn, the last of the three major capes in the Jules Verne trophy at 0004 UTC on Thursday 12th January. After leaving Ushant on 16th December, Joyon and his crew of five, Clément Surtel, Sébastien Audigane, Bernard Stamm, Gwénolé Gahinet and Alex Pella have achieved the best intermediate time between Ushant and Cape Horn, completing this stretch in 26 days, 15 hours, 45 minutes some 4 days 6 hours and 35 minutes ahead of the reference time set by Banque Populaire V in 2012 (30 days, 22 hours and 19 minutes). This is their fourth intermediate record including the Pacific Ocean record between the SE of Tasmania and Cape Horn with a time of 7 days 21 hours and 14 minutes (record held by Bruno Peyron since 2005 with a time of 8 days, 18 hours and 8 minutes).

    IDEC-SPORT sailed the 18,332 miles out on the water between Ushant and Cape Horn at an average speed of 28.7 knots.

    Jules Verne Trophy reference time / Banque Populaire V (2012): 45 days, 13 hours, 42 minutes and 53 seconds
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  4. #44
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    An Argentine Lift




    GETTING A LIFT OFF ARGENTINA
    13 January 2017

    And they’re off again! While they had to wait a short while for the low-pressure system to leave Argentina, Francis Joyon and his men sailing to the NW of the Falklands have enjoyed a good morning. The wind has built from the starboard stern of the IDEC SPORT maxi-trimaran, which is back up to high speeds again. Joyon, Surtel, Gahinet, Stamm, Audigane and Pella will be trying to get the most out of this disturbed weather system in the next two days.

    Making good progress towards the north on a good point of sail, they nevertheless have to avoid the very strong winds by gybing at the right moment this evening. Strong winds and a good angle, with decent seas ahead of the low and a crew that managed to get some rest in the calm conditions off the Falklands… everything is falling into place off Argentina to get back up to the incredible speeds we have seen from the IDEC maxi-trimaran over the past four weeks.



    “We’re going along at 27-30 knots on a very easterly bearing, which will gradually swing around to the north.” Clément Surtel, one of the five men in Joyon’s band of warriors, is calmly looking ahead to the next few days aboard IDEC SPORT, as they deal with the various hurdles in the South Atlantic. “With the big gennaker at 140° to the wind, on manageable seas, it’s smooth sailing time again. Yesterday was a day of extremely light airs, allowing the weary foot soldiers to get some rest and carry out an inspection of the boat,” explained the sailor in charge of the technical aspects. “I saw that there was some wear I hadn’t seen before,” he said with some astonishment. This goes to show how hard they have in fact been pushing the boat since 17th December. “We dealt with all these little problems and the boat is back to 100%. We’re pleased to get back up to speed this morning. We’re on our way home now. We are focusing on the boat and looking forward to a positive outcome. We need to remain focused until we get to Ushant.” Incidentally, Clément Surtel is a cousin to Servane Escoffier, Louis Burton’s wife. The skipper taking part in the Vendée Globe is just ahead of them and they were able to exchange a few e-mails.



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    Clear skies, flat calm seas, favourable winds… the helmsmen have however not yet finished with their gloves and protection. “We’re still down at 50°S and at night, it’s chilly, so we sleep with our wooly hats on,” said the youngest member of the crew, Gwénolé Gahinet, still in awe of the sights around the Falklands yesterday. “We enjoyed rounding the Horn and passing the Falklands. Since this morning we have got back up to high speed. We’re expecting 30-35-40 knot winds in the coming hours. That’s quite windy, but we don’t have that nasty swell that goes with it sometimes. We will turn off to avoid the worst of the low this evening between 1600hrs UTC and 2300hrs UTC.”

    6300 miles from the finish and in spite of a pleasant day as tourists off the Falklands, IDEC SPORT is now back up to more than 22 knots of VMG, with a lead of just over 1900 miles over the Jules Verne Trophy title-holder.
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    Negotiating With A Stubborn High





    Somewhat scalded by the insolent brio with which Francis Joyon and his extraordinary crew of the maxi trimaran Idec Sports are played of the vast seas of the great south, the Atlantic Ocean in its southern part had concocted a welcome tonic to more suitors to the quest The Trophy Jules Verne. Faced with the choice of extreme road, between long distance to the east, and looks like a close to the west, it's on a sea particularly difficult, "Casse boat" to be precise, that the Joyon, Pella, Thisor, Audigane Stamm and Gahinet have chosen, on the advice of a Marcel van Triest more involved than ever, to cling to the road north the most direct who leads them, at the start of their thirtieth day of race, to cross off the coast of Buenos Aires with a Comfortable advance on the holding of the trophy.






    The Maxi-trimaran idec sport comes to negotiate with a certain brio a first reef in the South Atlantic, materialized by the delicate negotiation of a southern depression very virulent in circulation since the Argentinian coast. All the exercise was to Joyon and his men to hang the northern edge of this rapid system, to take advantage of the winds of the South-West sector conducive for at a time, moving towards the east, then, imperceptibly, towards the north.



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