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Thread: IDEC Sport 2016-2017 Jules Verne Record Attempt

  1. #51
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    Pedal To The Metal




    STEPPING UP THE PACE
    23 January 2017

    The maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT stepped up the pace yesterday on the final stretch of her attempt to win the Jules Verne Trophy. It is looking windy and physical over the next 2000 miles or so to the finish off Ushant. Approaching the latitude of the Canaries, Francis Joyon and his men are making the most of the trade winds, which are swinging around astern of the boat allowing them to speed away downwind. Only the sea state and the swell are forcing them to calm things down. Regularly at 28 knots, IDEC SPORT is gradually moving eastwards, whereas until now they have been heading north. Her VMG towards the tip of Brittany is high and in the coming days, she should be clocking up around 700 miles a day. IDEC SPORT is hopping onto the southern edge of a low forming NW of the Azores to speed towards the finish on Thursday.




    TRACKER
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    Two Days Out




    IDEC SPORT : FULL SPEED AHEAD TO USHANT

    200 miles south of the Azores, IDEC SPORT is starting the final stretch of her round the world voyage in favourable winds, which they have managed to pick up, getting the timing just right ahead of a front associated with a low-pressure system. With the speedo firmly stuck at thirty knots, Francis Joyon, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella, Sébastien Audigane, Clément Surtel and Gwénolé Gahinet are on the home strait at the pace they set in the Southern ocean, maintaining high speeds, while remaining vigilant as they face the elements. With 1300 miles to go to the finish, they are now expected on Thursday morning in Brest after forty days of racing against the clock, as they enter the final phase of the Jules Verne Trophy attempt.




    © JM Liot / DPPI / IDEC SPORT


    "We're very lucky, as the weather is slotting into place. I think Francis must have spoken to the isobars," joked Bernard Stamm, who has every right to be pleased, with IDEC SPORT sailing smoothly on the North Atlantic swell under mainsail and gennaker in a 25-knot SSW'ly air stream. Approaching the Azores, everything is falling into place to allow them to continue to keep up the pace all the way to the coast of Brittany, as they sail practically on the direct route, clocking up miles in the most efficient way.


    TRACKER


    "Taking advantage of the weather that we are being given"
    "We are entering a SW'ly air stream. It's more or less a straight line at full speed to Ushant in strong winds. It's up to us now to ensure we don't make any mistakes. We won't be putting our foot down like we did in the Indian. We want to preserve what we have built up, but it is great to finish at such high speeds. We're all remaining focused not to take excessive risks with the gear, which needs to work properly until the finish. We are remaining very upbeat about this incredible weather opportunity," added the Swiss skipper, who is about to finish his sixth round the world voyage.

    "At the moment, what counts is going fast all the time to stay ahead of the front," confirmed Francis Joyon, who is right to feel confident about what lies ahead. "We may have to change tack at some point. We'll see. We'll be passing quite close to Cape Finisterre before crossing the Bay of Biscay with the wind and the seas on the beam."




    "An extraordinary boat"
    Just like the five crewmen accompanying him on this round the world voyage, he can also count on the qualities of IDEC SPORT and her ability to accelerate and keep up high speeds over long distances. We all remember that they managed to stay on one tack for eleven days, which allowed them to clock up distances in excess of 800 miles a day in the hostile southern latitudes. "We found out a lot about the boat during this voyage. She has made a lot of progress, because her sails are bigger, but also because we now know how to trim her more precisely to gain a few extra knots. She is an extraordinary boat, and is still at 100% of her potential with all her sails operational," he explained, while remaining well aware of the obstacles that lie ahead and could endanger what they have achieved. "By nature, I am very cautious, and until the line is crossed, we are not out of the woods. There are risks all the way to the finish. But we are well positioned in relation to the low and the weather should allow us to get to Brittany without hitch. We hope to finish in less than two days from now."
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  3. #53
    nOOb
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    Can some please post a screen shot of the current tracker map? For some reason I am not able to view the IDEC site any longer.
    Leave the gun. Take the cannoli.

  4. #54
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    IDEC Sport Expected In At Daybreak




    IDEC SPORT EXPECTED AT FIRST LIGHT ON THURSDAY
    25 January 2017


    IDEC SPORT is at full speed with the finish of the Jules Verne Trophy drawing near. With less than 550 miles to go, Francis Joyon, Clément Surtel, Bernard Stamm, Sébastien Audigane, Alex Pella and Gwénolé Gahinet are about to complete their victorious round the world voyage. They are currently averaging 35 knots off Cape Finisterre after 40 days of sailing and are expected early tomorrow morning off Ushant (0600-0800hrs UTC), where they will add their name to the list of champion crews taking the Jules Verne Trophy. Later tomorrow morning in Brest, a big welcome is planned, as they arrive almost five days ahead of the previous record (45d 13h 42mn 53sec).

    “It was fairly choppy in strong winds. The boat was getting shaken around. Even if we were going slightly slower in the 3-4m high waves, it reminded us of what we achieved in the Indian Ocean. We’re pleased to have remained ahead of the front,” commented Francis Joyon this morning, who clearly wants to finish at high speed. “We can’t wait to approach the finish,” he added, feeling confident and serene about the miles left to sail.



    TRACKER



    At his side, his five talented crewmen were all smiling. “We’re sailing downwind under J2 and we’ve got quite a lot of wind. We’re sailing at 35-38 knots on seas that are quite pleasant still. We are taking advntage of these final moments at sea and of this great boat, which is so fast,” confirmed Gwénolé Gahinet and Sébastien Audigane as they approached Cape Finisterre. They are now over 2000 miles ahead of the title-holder.

    “This Jules Verne Trophy is a straight line and we sailed it at the same pace as the fronts in the Southern Ocean, just as we are now doing in the North Atlantic. According to the latest simulations, we should also grab the intermediate record between the Equator and Ushant, which will be the icing ion the cake,” declared Clément Surtel. “’This is an exceptional trajectory. The sun has come up and we can push that bit harder.”

    Paying close attention to the shipping and hundredsds of cargo vessels and fishing boats in this area, the six sailors are taking the IDEC SPORT team to the rank of ninth holder of the Jules Verne Trophy after the crews led by Bruno Peyron, Peter Blake, Olivier de Kersauson, Franck Cammas and Loïck Peyron. “I have seen boats leaving for the Jules Verne Trophy that I prepared. Managing to grab this record is the high point of my sailing career and a dream come true. Crossing the finish in record time is bound to be a huge moment,” added Clément Surtel.

    Live coverage from 0900-1130hrs UTC

    After crossing the finish line between 0600 and 0800hrs UTC on Thursday morning the boat will sail towards Brest, where she is expected later in the morning. Coverage of this triumphant arrival will start from 0900hrs on the website and social media followed at 1130 by the boat mooring at the pontoon and the first reactions of the crew on the podium in front of the crowds that have turned out to welcome them.
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  5. #55
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    JOYON AND HIS MEN SHATTER THE JULES VERNE TROPHY RECORD
    26 January 2017
    The Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT sailed by Francis Joyon, Clément Surtel, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Gwénolé Gahinet and Sébastien Audigane won the Jules Verne Trophy, the outright round the world sailing record, this morning. They crossed the finish at 0749hrs UTC on Thursday 26th January 2017. Francis Joyon and his crew sailed the 22,461 theoretical miles in 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds, at an average speed of 22.84 knots. Out on the water, they actually sailed 26,412 miles at an average speed of 26.85 knots. They shattered the previous record set by Loïck Peyron and the crew of the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V by 4 days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 23 seconds. During this round the world voyage, they smashed no fewer than six intermediate records at Cape Leeuwin, off Tasmania, on the International Date Line, at Cape Horn, at the Equator and off Ushant.








    Francis Joyon, Sébastien Audigane, Bernard Stamm, Gwénolé Gahinet, Alex Pella et Clément Surtel have become the fastest round the world sailors in history. Aboard the 31.5m long maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT, they had a remarkable achievement with some incredible daily performances along the way, such as on the fourteenth day, when they clocked up 894 miles averaging 37.3 knots. For eight days, they sailed more than 800 miles and seven over 700 miles. Aboard the muiltihull designed in 2005 for a crew of twelve, Francis, Clément, Alex, Seb, Gwéno and Bernard have made it all look so simple, working perfectly together.

    “We set sail on 16th December, uncertain about the outcome, » explained the youngest member of the crew, Gwénolé Gahinet. After aborting their first attempt a few days before because of a hold-up in the Doldrums, Francis Joyon and his men set off again on 16th December, wondering about how the weather systems would evolve in the South Atlantic. Very early on, they showed what they could do and by the fifth day of racing had gained a lead of more than 210 miles over the record. But in the Doldrums, which never seemed to want to help the red and grey maxi trimaran, they suffered in an area of thunderstorms, huge wind shifts and calms. Averaging just 6.4 knots on 21st December, IDEC SPORT was to have their worst day there, sailing just 186 miles in 24 hours. They got further and further behind the pace of their virtual rival, Banque Populaire V and when they entered the roaring forties on the eleventh day, were 755 miles behind.










    A huge achievement in the Southern Ocean

    IDEC SPORT managed to find her way around the edge of the calms in the St. Helena high, cutting across the South Atlantic to hop onto a Southern low. They moved towards this system from the north-east and Joyon and his men would stay ahead of that system, taking advantage of strong NW’ly winds for eleven days, when the speed would rarely drop below thirty knots. With peak speeds of more than 44 knots, Joyon’s gang sailed straight across the inhospitable Southern Ocean passing the Cape of Good Hope, then Leeuwin with just 4 days and 9 hours between the two capes. By 4th January, they had extended their lead over the title-holder to a day and a half, as they passed to the south of Tasmania. One Australian fan pointed out that they had taken just two days to pass under Australia, “which you can’t even do in a car!” Just over a week later, Alex, Seb, Gwéno, Francis, Bernard and Clément clocked up another record at Cape Horn leaving Banque Populaire V 4 days and 6 hours behind IDEC SPORT.

    Dealing intelligently with the South Atlantic

    While Loïck Peyron and his men had a quick climb back up the South Atlantic, IDEC SPORT had to deal with a series of classic weather patterns. Once past the Falklands, a deep low appeared off Argentina, offering Joyon and his crew a nasty swell hitting them head on and SW’ly winds. They had to find a compromise between pushing hard to make headway north and preserving the boat. There were three possible routes off the south of Brazil with a series of transition zones. They could look for wind out to the east or sail upwind close to Brazil. Joyon with the support of his router, Marcel van Triest, chose a middle route to head north, which meant they had decent weather to pass Cape Frio and pick up the SE’ly trade winds. They then had to face the Doldrums again for the fourth time in two months. Living up to its bad reputation, this slowed the maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT in a calm patch, where although there was no thundery activity, the wind was very light. Once again, the analysis from Francis and Marcel suggested going around the outside a long way west and north of Fortaleza to enter the Northern Hemisphere. They pulled it off. “we never got entirely stopped,” exclaimed Joyon when he found the trade winds.









    A final triumphant sprint

    Off the Cape Verde Islands, the wind gradually came around with the trade winds offering IDEC SPORT a good angle and wind strength to approach the south of the Azores. Once again, Joyon and Co hopped onto the train and set off at speed for Brittany. They were back up to high speeds in excess of thirty knots to draw a parabola from NE Brazil to Brittany.

    Facts and figures…

    The worst day was on 21st December with a VMG of just 6.4 knots
    Their best day was the fourteenth, when they sailed 894 miles averaging 37.3 knots
    Their biggest deficit in comparison to Banque Populaire was 755 nm on the11th day (26th December).
    The maximum lead was on the 41st day (26th January)
    Their worst loss was 384 nm in 24h on the tenth day and their biggest 24h gain, 416 nm on the 25th day (9th January).
    Total distance actually sailed: 26,412 miles, in comparison to Banque Populaire V’s 29,002 miles

    Intermediate times:

    Equator: 5 days, 18 hrs, 59 minutes, or 4 hrs and 3 minutes behind Banque Populaire V
    Good Hope: 12 days, 19 hrs, 28 minutes, or 21 hrs and 40 minutes behind Banque Populaire V
    Cape Agulhas: 12 days, 21 hrs, 22 minutes, or 21 hrs, 34 minutes behind Banque Populaire V
    Cape Leeuwin: 17 days, 6 hrs, 59 minutes, or 16 hrs and 58 minutes ahead of Banque Populaire V
    Tasmania: 18 days, 18 hrs and 31 minutes, or 1 day, 12 hrs and 43 minutes ahead of Banque Populaire V
    Cape Horn: 26 days, 15 hrs and 45 minutes, or 4 days and 6 hrs ahead of Banque Populaire V
    Equator: 35 days 4 hrs and 9 minutes, or 2 days, 22 hrs and 36 minutes ahead of Banque Populaire V.
    Equator – Ushant: 5 days, 19 hrs, 21 minutes
    Last edited by Photoboy; 01-26-2017 at 10:25 AM.
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  6. #56
    "They shattered the previous record set by Loïck Peyron and the crew of the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V by 4 days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 23 seconds"

    AMAZING!!!

  7. #57
    That record should stick around for a good long while!

    That's the same boat that Lending Club rented for a while, isn't it?

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