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Thread: MACIF Enters The Starting Blocks Sunday

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    MACIF Enters The Starting Blocks Sunday




    THE MACIF TRIMARAN IS ON STANDBY*
    FROM SUNDAY 22 OCTOBER

    The start of the standby period for the single-handed round the world record is only a few days away, as it gets underway on Sunday 22 October. François Gabart is already studying the weather situation closely with the routing team run by Jean-Yves Bernot. In the last two years, the man they call "the Wizard" has established a relationship of total trust with the skipper of the MACIF trimaran and his team, to decide on the best window to set sail and step up to the plate of this single-handed round the world record!


    How the standby period works

    François Gabart together with the whole team will be on standby as of Sunday, with a view to attempting the single-handed round the world record. The skipper is ready and so is the MACIF trimaran. All that remains is to choose the right time to leave and this means opting for an ideal weather window to get the record attempt off to a good start. "Today, we are considering a weather window that takes us roughly up until the equator. Our main concern is having good weather as far as the southern hemisphere. Obviously, when the boat sets sail, we have a fair idea of what to expect as she makes the transition from the North Atlantic to the low pressure areas of the South Atlantic, but there is still some uncertainty. We will have to cross our fingers so that everything after that works well", explains François Gabart.

    The skipper of MACIF, the team, and the weather routing team have made the departure procedure as simple as possible. "The advantage of a solo record, is that we do not have the constraint of bringing a crew home. On the other hand, there are still about thirty people working on the project in need of clear information. It is also important to inform the public, so that people can come and see us on the day we set off and so that they can follow the adventure."




    Colour codes

    In practice, how do they work?

    "Red means that no weather window is in sight. We indicate the number of days ahead of us in which it is unlikely that we will set sail. It can be a very short period, just like it could last four to five days, but it shouldn't be much more than this.

    If it is orange it means a window is forming. When it turns green, this means we're leaving", says François Gabart, who will give the final go-ahead.


    François Gabart has been using the services of Jean-Yves Bernot from the start of the project, to help analyse weather conditions to choose a departure date and will use them again for tactical choices in relation to his route. "I have known Jean-Yves since I started offshore racing in the Figaro, but I was already reading and rereading his books when I was sailing on Optimists! Beyond his experience and his undoubted skill, he is a very good teacher, capable of explaining very complicated things simply". The man they call "the Wizard" on the pontoons worked alongside the skipper of MACIF when he won the Transat Jacques Vabre 2015 and The Transat Bakerly in 2016 (routing was not allowed on The Bridge) and they have established a very trusting relationship. "The trust is total and necessary, since, arguably, he is the man I will discuss things with the most often during this round the world. Jean-Yves will be my crewman, my alter ego ashore", confirms François. "This is a two-way relationship. I think he also trusts what I am capable of doing on the boat and my ability to apply a strategy he suggests."



    Jean-Yves Bernot will be accompanied by Julien Villion, who has been working with him for several years, along with three members of the MACIF trimaran team: Antoine Gautier, Guillaume Combescure and Emilien Lavigne.



    "The idea is to rely on Jean-Yves' clear expertise in routing, but also on people who are familiar with how the MACIF trimaran handles. Antoine, Guillaume and Emilien work on the boat all year long. The first two took part in The Bridge. They can provide valuable information to Jean-Yves and Julien on how to handle her in a variety of conditions. This is why they have both been sailing with me a lot during training sessions. It was essential that they get the full measure of the boat and that they see how she handles in the wind, in flat calm, by night and by day."


    From the start of the standby period and then during the round the world, the weather routing team will work at full capacity, with the aim of suggesting the best possible routes to François Gabart. They will have little room for leeway in beating this record, currently held by Thomas Coville at 49 days, 3 hours, 4 minutes and 28 seconds. "During the record, they will work constantly, 24 hours, 7 days a week, to analyse the weather situation, give it due thought, pass around the routings, and provide me with answers if I have questions, but they will also process the data from the boat", says the MACIF skipper. "I must admit that I love this field. I like to spend time comparing my points of views with the others, but perhaps I should allow myself to take guidance from time to time so that I can concentrate more on performance", he ends. Faced with the need to optimise every second, François Gabart does not rule out changing the way in which he deals with routing during this round the world.

    (* Period during which François Gabart will wait for a suitable weather window for this round the world record.)
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    Green Light For Macif



    Record around the world: The trimaran MACIF triggers the green code!

    The green code is now activated: François Gabart should therefore start in the next 24 hours for his record attempt around the world alone. Indeed, the latest weather files tend to confirm the window announced yesterday.

    Currently docked in Port-La-Forêt, its home base, the MACIF trimaran will leave the pontoon in the late afternoon to join the starting line at Ouessant, which he should cross tomorrow, Saturday morning.

    Next news in the coming hours!
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    Gabart Departs!






    Credit: Jean-Marie Liot / ALeA / Macif

    On standby since 22 October, François Gabart cast off today, Saturday 4 November, at 10.05 (French time, UTC+1) to take on the challenge of the single-handed round the world record. The MACIF trimaran skipper left his home port of Port-la-Forêt, on Friday evening, to make his way to the round the world starting line located between the Créac'h lighthouse, in Ouessant (Ushant), and the Lizard Point lighthouse in Cornwall, England, before setting sail in an 18-knot north-westerly.








    To beat the record, held since 25 December 2016, by Thomas Coville in 49 days, 3 hours, 4 minutes and 28 seconds, François Gabart will need to cross the finishing line before 13.09 on 23 December (French time, UTC+1). In addition to working relentlessly to push his 30-metre trimaran as hard as he can, he will also need a sequence of favourable weather conditions, starting with the weather he will meet on the first run to the equator, which Thomas Coville crossed last year in 5 days, 17 hours, 11 minutes and 52 seconds.








    "We hope that this weather window will be the right one to pick up the trade wind and quickly head towards the South Atlantic. It's a small window. I may not be the best window in the world, but there comes a time when you have to leave! We have a fair idea of what weather we will have until the equator, but not after that. This is also part of the record attempt. This is why we have chosen to leave now. We have to try and we'll see near Brazil if the weather follows on as we would hope. The timing is really important, since this is a record that's almost impossible to beat. Thomas [Coville] sailed wonderfully and the weather windows followed on from each other perfectly. So I will do my very best to get close to what he did. You really need to have a guiding star and a little success to have weather windows that follow on from each other well right until the end. I'm really impatient to sail around the world on this beautiful boat. It has taken nearly 2 years of work to get to this stage... now, it's time to go!"

    TRACKER


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    TRACKER

    Gabart has jumped to a 54 NM lead over Thomas Coville's record pace!
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    2 days in with 126 nm advance!

    Incredible!

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    Transitions without Transition




    Starting three days ago from Brest, François Gabart is still making headway to the south of the globe, a few miles ahead of Thomas Coville's record. Since Saturday, even though the road seems to have hit the past few hours, the skipper of the trimaran MACIF is methodically moving towards a new way of life.

    Right in front of the trimaran MACIF, on the port side, the Cape Verde Islands will soon be a new marker on the road to the record. The country of the morna, so dear to Cesaria Evora, will figure in things that are not to do during this day of Tuesday. The next, more virtual, landmark will be Ecuador. For the time being, François Gabart is in the limelight of the initial march and forecasts that led him to start Saturday morning: the routes always make him enter the southern hemisphere after 5 days and 22 hours of rush.




    In 72 hours, it's a whole world that has been upset, at 29.03 knots average, without that François really has the leisure to realize it. Certainly, the skipper MACIF put on his superb fangs and provisionally put away his boots, but the other transitions, those that made him go from preparation to action, it is the unconscious that recorded them. Finished, the time of the reflection in the freshness of Brest, places in the oven of the African coasts and the mills to turn. Forgotten, the effervescence of the Bay of Biscay, place to the relative loneliness - there must still be some fishermen without AIS in the vicinity. The great hours of sleep are an old memory; it is now in split rest, a listening in hand and an ear stretched over the noises of the edge that Francis recovers.

    The transition will become even more important as the MACIF trimaran gets closer to the vast expanses of desert. The Charente skipper will soon have to focus his brain on weather files, routing tips, confrontation with the reality of the terrain, the sensations of the sailor. Here comes the time of perception, feeling and permanent adaptation. Welcome to mindfulness, in symbiosis with what the planet has more moving and the search for balance and circulation of energies. François has already entered the world of wind and water. In Chinese, it says Feng shui. All this would be peaceful if there were not, to make things worse, a trimaran 100 feet to lead and a record to erase.

    Grains, that sucks!

    It will not be a small affair. Even if the tempo of maneuvers stabilized (3480 turns of winch anyway) and that the skipper trimaran MACIF could sleep a little (3h41 of sleep), the last 24 hours were not of any rest. Since yesterday, François crosses grain, some of which proved quite annoying. The registration - a shot on the right, a shot on the left - would have been perfect if one of them did not interfere in the workings ... " Just after the jybe, I remained stuck behind a grain for an hour , having to go heading north-west when I wanted to go south, says François. An hour later, I managed to pass under a grain, at the limit of the rain. It was going fast, but it was hot! I was under gennaker and mainsail high to face the bar gusts of 35 knots coming in seconds. I was going in the right direction, but I spent time at the helm trying to keep it all in place . "

    This morning, after three days of racing, François counted 67 miles ahead of the record breaking time (basically, three hours of sailing at the current tempo). MACIF advanced under gennaker, small J3 in mainsail and mainsail high mode in 12 to 14 knots of wind. " That's not what I prefer," says the loner. " The boat forces a lot, I prefer when there is more wind, I have a reef in the mainsail and the boat pushes the box without force ."







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    Macif Maintains Lead


    TRACKER


    Line of sight
    François Gabart keeps a slight lead over Thomas Coville's reference time last year, but as he overcame the Cape Verde archipelago that night, he has to prepare for the slowdown in the "Pot-au-Noir". After four days at sea, the trimaran MACIF must especially find the gateway to the southern hemisphere ...

    This is probably one of the most difficult phases to negotiate on this solo world tour: crossing the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) which marks the clash between the trade winds of each hemisphere. Located this day between parallel 8 ° North and 4 ° North, this Pot-au-Noir seems to propose a passage around the 30 ° West without much slowdown. However, the trimaran MACIF begins to change pace since Wednesday morning in a trade wind from north-east to east of fifteen knots.




    Entrance in the evening

    However, the day yesterday was not easy first because of the more unstable weather conditions on the water than expected: "Still under big gennaker with the small jib (J-3) in the role of staysail. I had the mainsail high and it was not easy because the boat was not bad ... I prefer when there is more wind because with a reef in the mainsail, the boat goes to the bottom without force ... In In fact, I galley with grains! One of them was very small and yet it caused me a big wind failure: it went from 20 knots to 10 in a few seconds ... "

    Fortunately since his third jibe off the Canary Islands, François Gabart was able to tumble south to pass 250 miles in the west of the archipelago of Cape Verde around midnight. And if the disturbance of the volcanic relief did not take place at this distance, the loner did not have a very simple night to manage: the fleet of sailboats that participates in the Mini-Transat was precisely on its way between the Santo Antão island and the Antilles, most of the competitors just overflowing this mark course ... The sunrise was therefore a relief for the skipper who no longer had to stay glued to his radar or standby in his cockpit to avoid collision !




    Southern hemisphere favorable

    Since now less than 250 miles from the entrance to the Doldrums, the trimaran MACIF must approach this area in the evening: without being particularly favorable, the ITCZ ​​has a standard configuration extending between 8 ° N and 4 ° N with trade winds in the northern hemisphere and the southern hemisphere oriented to the east, suggesting a relatively fast passage. As to whether François Gabart will maintain his advance of a hundred miles on the reference time established at the equator by Thomas Coville (5d 17h 15 '), there is no way to judge before this area of ​​hazards and d uncertainties.

    But anyway, the trimaran MACIF should put between 5 days and a half and six days to reach the line of change of hemisphere where the trade winds of East blow to a small score of nodes. From this weekend, François Gabart will find speeds of over thirty knots to slide along the Brazilian coast. But even before Cape Frio, these trade winds take a North direction: the Saint Helena high pressure which manages the weather conditions in the South Atlantic is indeed very well positioned on the South African side, which allows the depressions that form in the Gulf of Rio de Janeiro, to quickly cross this subtropical zone to reach the Roaring Forties. A magnificent elevator to reach the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope with advance ... And especially a favorable position to approach the Indian Ocean!
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    Macif Works Its' Way Through The Doldrums

    First blow and big heat




    For the first time since the beginning of his attempt against the record of the world tour alone, François Gabart has gone into the red. Do not panic: the passage times are respected, and the short-term goals are even revised upwards!


    After four consecutive days of profit-taking, the Gabart action falls slightly on the record exchange Thursday, after 24 hours of less vigorous transactions. Yesterday, at 18 hours, the trimaran MACIF and its skipper entered the doldrums and, to greet this arrival in hostile ground, the winds fell, falling sometimes under 3 knots in the night. From the ground, Jean-Yves Bernot had felt the brakes, which figured prominently on the board. The awesome router had even a little overestimated the slowdown, since the tunes of 20-25 knots played overtime at the end of the day before collapsing, which allowed François Gabart to gain a little on the forecast. Ecuador is announced after 5 days and 21 hours of hunting. It's an hour gained on the initial board.




    Since this morning, the trimaran MACIF gradually picks up speed by touching the first breaths of the southern trade winds, but in alternative mode. At 18 knots recorded over an hour shortly before lunchtime followed a soft period. At noon, the fleet of the Mini-Transat - cuckoo, Guillaume Combescure! - and the doldrums behind his back, the MACIF trimaran slowed down. As it was the case last night, François will have to continue to play a little leapfrog with his trimaran, from one cloud to another, from one vein of wind to another, grappling here or there a bonus to clear his losses, of the order of 60 miles on the road imposed by Thomas Coville. A trifle, in short. For the agios, we will organize.



    TRACKER



    And if not, on board? The morning was as active as it was last night. The sleep was a little rare (3 hours 30 in 24 hours), and the series of maneuvers solicited the organism, especially since it is much hotter than on the whole of the Hexagon: the thermometer is around 28 degrees in the shade. Challenging conditions that the coolness of the Bay of Biscay for the skipper, particularly more sensitive to heat than cold. The effect "fan" in the cockpit is not enough to overcome the burden on the body. But that too, it was anticipated: to compensate for the losses due to sweating, Francis adds to 2 to 4 liters of water that he drinks daily capsules of mineral salts specially developed for him by his nutrition partner, Sojasun, and the sports nutritionist Jean-Jacques Menuet, as part of the MACIF trimaran partnership. Yes, a success on a world tour is preparing well upstream ...




    François Gabart set off last Saturday to attempt the single-handed round the world record, held by Thomas Coville (49 days, 3 hours, 4 minutes and 28 seconds), and is due to cross the Equator on Friday morning, after about 6 days at sea, which was his goal when he set sail from Ouessant (Ushant). After this, the situation is also looking favourable, with a low-pressure area off Argentina, which could bring good speeds as the MACIF trimaran heads to the Cape of Good Hope.

    It is almost behind him now! Ocean racers always dread the doldrums as they often mean slowing down suddenly and strong thunderstorms. This intertropical area of convergence only slightly hindered the progress of MACIF, which entered it on Wednesday, and had virtually left it late in the morning on Thursday. "After a quick run down the North Atlantic, progress has been a little slower since yesterday evening. I had thunderstorms early in the night, and then, I found myself in light air. Fortunately, I met the strong winds when it was still daylight, so it was easier to handle. At the end of the night, the wind picked up. I really thought it was over. I was making speeds of 30 knots, but the wind dropped again and I'm now making progress at 10-12 knots. We have lost a little of the headway we had made, but it will pick up in 3-4 hours, so I can't complain", François Gabart said this lunchtime during a radio session organised at the Paris headquarters of Macif with the group's employees.

    6 is the number of days, to a few hours and minutes, that François Gabart must take to cross the Equator, probably on Friday morning. Most likely, the reference time established one year ago by Thomas Coville (5 days 17 hours 11 minutes and 52 seconds) will not be beaten, but as far as the skipper of the MACIF trimaran is concerned the important thing is to achieve his goal of crossing it in roughly 6 days. "It was one of the criteria for setting sail. We said that if we had a weather window enabling us to get below the Equator in 6 days, then it was time to go. I am a little disappointed at not beating the record, especially as I believed it was possible, but that's life and there's something bigger and better to follow on from this..."


    Admittedly, the MACIF trimaran probably will not be able to add the reference time at the Equator to its record of achievements, but the overall impression of its skipper during the run down the Atlantic confirms that this boat, which reached top speeds of 46 knots, clearly has what it takes to attempt the round the world record. "The boat is capable of extraordinary speeds" he says. At 30 knots, I feel like I'm getting nowhere! We sail at 35-40 knots a lot of the time and I have spent minutes and even hours above 40 knots. That's 70 km/hr. That's amazing for a boat! We often talk about flying and there really are many times when nothing touches the water, except the foil. When the boat lifts up from the water and accelerates the sensations are incredible. I'm impatient to experience this again".


    François Gabart is near the Equator

    François Gabart set off last Saturday to attempt the single-handed round the world record, held by Thomas Coville (49 days, 3 hours, 4 minutes and 28 seconds), and is due to cross the Equator on Friday morning, after about 6 days at sea, which was his goal when he set sail from Ouessant (Ushant). After this, the situation is also looking favourable, with a low-pressure area off Argentina, which could bring good speeds as the MACIF trimaran heads to the Cape of Good Hope.


    Place: the doldrums


    It is almost behind him now! Ocean racers always dread the doldrums as they often mean slowing down suddenly and strong thunderstorms. This intertropical area of convergence only slightly hindered the progress of MACIF, which entered it on Wednesday, and had virtually left it late in the morning on Thursday. "After a quick run down the North Atlantic, progress has been a little slower since yesterday evening. I had thunderstorms early in the night, and then, I found myself in light air. Fortunately, I met the strong winds when it was still daylight, so it was easier to handle. At the end of the night, the wind picked up. I really thought it was over. I was making speeds of 30 knots, but the wind dropped again and I'm now making progress at 10-12 knots. We have lost a little of the headway we had made, but it will pick up in 3-4 hours, so I can't complain", François Gabart said this lunchtime during a radio session organised at the Paris headquarters of Macif with the group's employees.



    Number: 6


    6 is the number of days, to a few hours and minutes, that François Gabart must take to cross the Equator, probably on Friday morning. Most likely, the reference time established one year ago by Thomas Coville (5 days 17 hours 11 minutes and 52 seconds) will not be beaten, but as far as the skipper of the MACIF trimaran is concerned the important thing is to achieve his goal of crossing it in roughly 6 days. "It was one of the criteria for setting sail. We said that if we had a weather window enabling us to get below the Equator in 6 days, then it was time to go. I am a little disappointed at not beating the record, especially as I believed it was possible, but that's life and there's something bigger and better to follow on from this..."



    Phrase: "At 30 knots, I feel like I'm getting nowhere!"


    Admittedly, the MACIF trimaran probably will not be able to add the reference time at the Equator to its record of achievements, but the overall impression of its skipper during the run down the Atlantic confirms that this boat, which reached top speeds of 46 knots, clearly has what it takes to attempt the round the world record. "The boat is capable of extraordinary speeds" he says. At 30 knots, I feel like I'm getting nowhere! We sail at 35-40 knots a lot of the time and I have spent minutes and even hours above 40 knots. That's 70 km/hr. That's amazing for a boat! We often talk about flying and there really are many times when nothing touches the water, except the foil. When the boat lifts up from the water and accelerates the sensations are incredible. I'm impatient to experience this again".



    Next Rendezvous Cape of Good Hope


    Before even changing to the southern hemisphere Friday morning, François Gabart was already focussed on the days to follow, which are looking favourable: "The really good news, is that for the moment, everything looks like it will follow on well in the South Atlantic as far as South Africa, and this is really important, because this is something you have no control over when you leave", said the skipper happily, in his radio session with Macif headquarters. In practice what does that mean? "There's a low-pressure area off Argentina which will move to the east and we should be able to recover it to take us as far as South Africa. The weather files I looked at this morning with Jean-Yves Bernot's routing team gave a sailing time of 6-7 days to the Cape of Good Hope." On the clock this is about 13 days, when it took Thomas Coville 14.



    Health check: all is well!



    After less than a week at sea at very high speeds, François Gabart is aware that he has tapped into his physical and mental reserves - such a challenge obviously means pulling out all the stops - but he is very careful about how he sails: "Attempting a record like this obviously pushes you to the limit, but you have to be careful not to reach breaking point beyond which it is difficult to recover. For example, I am slower at some of the manoeuvres than in training, I take the time to warm up and I do them progressively so as not to do any damage to myself". In the same manner, the MACIF skipper manages his sleep in such a way as to always have a clear mind. "The night before the doldrums, as I knew it was going to be tough, I anticipated this and succeeded in sleeping almost a full night". A full night on board MACIF? "Over 6 hours in small 20-minute naps. This helped me recover and I needed to, since the following night was a bit harder and didn't sleep quite so much"
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    MACIF Crosses The Equator





    Friday, November 10, 2017
    Exhaust
    It took a little less than six days for François Gabart to cross the equator since his departure in Ouessant on Saturday. And even if the trimaran MACIF concedes a few hours compared to the reference time established by Thomas Coville, the meteorological configuration of the southern hemisphere appears very favorable for the continuation of this solo world tour ...

    Going around the world by sea remains an exceptional human challenge and trying to break a record, a long quest marked by a succession of ups and downs, a reverse mental sinusoid: when the state of the sea subsides, It is not easy to keep calm when the miles pass in reverse ... But even before his departure from Ouessant, François Gabart knew that the challenge to reach the equator in less than six days was high flying and improve the time of his predecessor (5d 17h 11 '52' '), a Grail.



    TRACKER

    A pot pourri

    Because to see his accumulated advance thanks to a determination without flaw in the first days of the sea where MACIF was crisping the 45 knots in peak and the thirty knots of average to the Canaries, is not a sinecure ... To own nearly 120 miles with the The entrance of the Doldrums and 140 miles of disbursement just across the equator barely two days later is never a joy! The Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) that François Gabart had to cross in more than one day was clearly not favorable, especially since to get out of it, the loner had to make a parabola towards the west that '34 ° West longitude brushed a less favorable position to then overflow the Brazilian coast.



    In comparison, Thomas Coville had swallowed this Doldrums almost without slowing down and coming out on the thirtieth, nearly 200 miles further east ... "We had told ourselves that if we had a weather that could allow us to go down to the equator in six days, you had to leave. There is still a bit of disappointment not to break the record ... "said François Gabart Thursday. However, the difference in latitude is only about sixty miles and the trimaran lengthens the stride again to more than twenty knots average.





    Hanging the Argentinean depression

    From now on, the challenge is in front of the bows: François Gabart will have to nibble the miles to pass more than sixty miles from the banks of Recife so as not to be in the buffer zone due to the percussion of the Eastern trade winds on the Brazilian relief . A configuration that requires him to maintain a course a little more Southeast in a now stabilized breeze in the East. But within 24 hours, the trimaran will be able to start releasing the plays in a wind that will progressively move north-east in front of Salvador de Bahia, then frankly strengthen by taking a North component near Cape Frio: a depression is being formed off Argentina!

    It is this weather phenomenon that can completely reverse the trend in a matter of hours as it should then slide towards the Roaring Forties by pushing back the Saint Helena high. By sailing on the back of this depression in two days, François Gabart can very quickly enter the South Seas and cross the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope in less than two weeks, which would be a great start to tackle the Indian Ocean, then the Pacific. And this time with a lead of more than half a day on the reference time!

    Time to cross the equator
    François Gabart / MACIF trimaran: 5 days 20h 45 min, or 3h34 behind the reference time
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    Reeling In The Days





    Saturday, November 11, 2017
    To do good, despite everything

    Saturday, the morning of the eighth day of his attempt against the record of the solo round the world, François Gabart had resumed speed after an unstable passage. Difficult under these circumstances to take care of yourself. It is imperative, however, that only starts his marathon across the globe.

    *After seven days of sliding south, François Gabart now surveyed the other half of the planet. At 24.6 knots average over the last 24 hours, the skipper of the trimaran MACIF managed to curb his losses during the day that followed its crossing of the equator. It was Friday morning, around 6:50 am (French time), that Francis rocked on the other side of the globe with 3:35 behind the time of Thomas Coville during his victorious attempt.



    Tracker


    This first time of passage has a symbolic meaning, but not only: it is also to his analysis that a skipper can choose whether to continue his attempt or not.
    For once, François will not hesitate for a second to continue to trace its beautiful trajectory. The following promises indeed quite radiant. This morning, the Charente skipper continued his route south along the coast of Brazil, near Salvador de Bahia (cuckoo, the transat Jacques Vabre!). By a big day, it should reach a depression that will gradually swell and then hurtling towards South Africa. Pile the MACIF trimaran road, say so!

    A comforting omen: "We will look for the depression that is born in Brazil and will descend to the Cape of Good Hope and, for now, it is very, very good." This depression should lead him to cross the first of the three great caps around the world in about 12 days. Better than Thomas Coville, who had pained on the Ouessant-Bonne Espérance stretch in 14 days ...



    DIY sequence!

    François Gabart has transformed himself into a small handyman to repair his "J1 galette", the piece to fix one of his sails before.
    Exclusive do-it-yourself course live off Brazil:



    *
    Do not forget yourself in the heart of the day ...

    Yesterday, the trimaran MACIF has passed off the atoll das Rocas, a pretty little corner of the Atlantic. The popular saying is that when you come across an atoll, you do not care. And this is one of the concerns of Francis at the beginning of the race: do not (too much) hit the boat, of course, but also treat the sailor. This goes through some well established principles, but often jostled over time. This also involves the management of "enemies of circumstance".

    *
    "Of course, I typed in the guy, because we have to get a record that was positioned at 49 days. We must preserve ourselves
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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