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Thread: MACIF Enters The Starting Blocks Sunday

  1. #11
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    Life In The Fast Lane





    Sunday, November 12, 2017
    Those who smell will take the train

    Oh, green! This Sunday morning, François was again ahead of Thomas Coville's lap times. The bows now pointing to the southeast, Francois will seek the best place on the back of a depression that could lead in record time at Good Hope. A great weather sniff sniffed from the ground.

    *Saturday was not an easy day on board the MACIF trimaran as the time had come for the big left turn. After a fairly quiet night in the southern trade winds, high mainsail and J2 post, the morning yesterday has borne a lot of complexities. Clouds and big variations of wind pushed Francis to play timely or forced recalculations. Efforts far from being useless since, carried by winds of 20 knots, the MACIF trimaran sped well all the afternoon, touching speeds (27-32 knots) higher than what provided the routings.

    On the map, the delay in Sodebo's turnaround time has narrowed to green, as are the future forecasts. Launched this Sunday morning at 30 knots, François now has the nose pointed towards the coasts of South Africa. Over the next 36 hours, the trimaran MACIF will advance downwind in beautiful conditions of navigation, which will allow him to choose the moment to climb on the train. The depression that was watching the weather cell has taken hold in the south of Argentina. Here she goes back along the coasts of South America before sliding from west to east, from the Americas to Africa, from Cabo Frio to the Cape of Good Hope, the next counter visited by the MACIF Express. It's been several days since, in the reference of Jean-Yves Bernot, in Charente Maritime, we make sure every moment that the train will be on time.




    TRACKER

    *Life in front of the screen of the cloud tamers

    *Since early November, Châtelaillon-Plage is Houston. Here vibrates the same passion for the beautiful trajectory as at the control center of NASA. Chez Jean-Yves Bernot. The consumption of electricity is not the same - advantage USA - but, gastronomy side, the victory of Charente-Maritime is without appeal!

    *"The cook of Jean-Yves is fantasizing a lot of people, laughs Julien Villion, who regularly plays the assistant of the famous router, since 2014. We are very quickly taken by the arrival of the files and their analysis and, without this attention of Jean -Yves and the availability of so
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  2. #12
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    The diagonal of the South

    The meteorological configuration is particularly favorable since the equator for François Gabart, left to establish an exceptional reference time to the passage of the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope: sliding on the back of an Argentinean depression, the MACIF trimaran goes to engage very quickly in the South Seas ...

    The sailors are accustomed to slicing through the maritime routes marked by compulsory passages, like a world tour with its three capes (Bonne-Esperance, Leeuwin, Horn) and the equator. Geographical landmarks and temporal references that make it possible to reposition oneself in the space-time of a world in perpetual movement. But in the marine reality, the seas do not stand out as parts of four-quarters: the progression is intimately linked to the succession of meteorological phenomena ...


    Earth is round, the sea too!

    If the rotundity of our planet is known to us from time immemorial, the fact of making the tour dates only from the trip Fernão de Magellan reported by the Italian Antonio Pigafetta at the beginning of the 16th century and it was not until the twentieth that the journey becomes a challenge, then a record ... But in fact, this sailing world tour does not unfold like that of Jules Verne, traveling as far as possible from the equator to and from London : Phileas Fogg and Jean Passepartout had then eighty days to go around the world and the goal of François Gabart is to put less than 49 days and three hours. And if the distance to travel remains the same, about 40 000 km or 21 600 nautical miles, the way to tackle the challenge is not at all the same!



    *

    In fact, it is not only three oceans that must be crossed, it is a series of meteorological situations that must be hung: the rotation of the Earth on itself causes a movement of the atmosphere with depressions that move mainly from west to east (in the northern hemisphere as in the southern hemisphere) around more or less stabilized anticyclones in an area of ​​the ocean (Azores, Bermuda, St. Helena ...).

    But to make a complete rotation around the Earth by the sea, impossible to follow the equator: it is necessary to go around the fifth continent, the Antarctic! The trajectory from Ouessant is North-South to reach the Roaring Forties, West-East to cross the Indian Ocean then the Pacific, South-North to climb from Cape Horn to Brittany Point.



    TRACKER

    Cut the cheese

    During his descent to Brazil, the trimaran MACIF was able to draw a large line (with some unhookings) off the coast of Salvador Bahia where Thomas Coville, record holder around the world alone (49d 03h 4 ') is on course to win at the Transat Jacques Vabre ... But it's the following that changes the deal: François Gabart benefits from the passage of an Argentinean depression that allows him to "cut the cheese", to go almost directly towards the Cape of Good Hope when his predecessor had had to dive further south before putting the flashing light on the left!

    *

    In fact from a meteorological point of view, the sailor passes from a vertical situation where the weather phenomena arrive by crooked (winds of North-West at the beginning, trade winds of North-East in the Canaries, Pot-au-Noir, trade winds south-east after the equator) to a horizontal configuration (west-east depressions) to Cape Horn. It is this phase of transition on a large scale that François Gabart is living successfully since he will be able to gradually transform his verticality into horizontality ... going through a diagonal!



    *

    This rare case can only be renewed on a world sailing trip when it returns to the northern hemisphere when the trimaran MACIF has crossed the equator again to pull its last edge towards Ouessant: sometimes the sailors benefit from this diagonal which saves precious time during the final rush while munching on the Azores anticyclone ...


    Because when shorter path and faster progression go hand in hand, the result is not long in coming: more than 250 miles of margin at the edge of this tenth day of the sea. And this cushion should turn into a mattress at the passage of the cape of Good Hope with almost two days ahead of Thomas Coville! To date, only two crews have descended below the twelve days to reach the longitude of South Africa from Ushant: Loïck Peyron (11d 21h 48 ') and Yann Guichard (11d 22h 04') ...






    Batten problem identified

    This afternoon, François Gabart noticed a latte problem aboard the trimaran MACIF.
    To assess the extent of the breakage, he had to lower his GV around 16:30 to gain
    access to the Batten in question and attempt a repair, currently underway. More info to come
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  3. #13
    Cant understand the french so much. but it looks lie he is having fun!

  4. #14
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    Batten Car Repaired, Gabart Slingshots to a 465nm Lead!




    Ideal road, steady and buoyant winds, it took a latte to get involved yesterday to create a problem on this perfect trajectory. A problem ? A problem for Francis, one of the strengths is to have perfectly integrated that his adventures are a sum of hazards to deal with, without emotion or anger, but with coolness and method. And that's what amazed the technical team yesterday afternoon when it was necessary to repair. This is the third batten from the top that broke. It was therefore necessary to lower the two-thirds of the sail to repair. François enlisted, then jumped on the boom to operate without anesthesia, but with a good dose of courage: the sails were still in place, allowing the boat to continue to advance at 15 knots. A batten is a long piece of carbon that slips into a horizontal sheath in a sail and hangs in a trolley near the mast. This is where the profile was broken.



    TRACKER
    *

    After a message to the land asking for help and a three-way discussion with Antoine Gautier and the two boat captains, Fred Bérat and Sébastien Gladu was born a procedure to apply. "On land, we have the same tools as François, to be able to project on what François has, says Fred. This allowed us to tell him which tools to use, one after the other, in a timed way, and also to tell him that such a piece, such screw, was in such a bag and in such pocket. François had only to follow our recommendations.





    The mimicry of the Earth

    The handyman of the MACIF trimaran will have had to use the grinder to cleanly cut the batten close to the cart; to release this one of the end of batten which remained in place; reinsert the healthy slat into the cart; propel yourself to the other end of the mainsail to push the batten into place and tension the fabric. The essential function of a batten is indeed to stiffen the mainsail to give it a shape and make it effective in the wind. Everything was done in 2 hours 30 TTC, mainsail hoisted with two reefs, since the wind forced, and a good dose of effort, because it is not nothing to fight with tens of kilos of cloth in tinkering with a carbon tube made to stay in its place ...




    *

    The result ? Almost perfect, says Fred Bérat: "The effectiveness of the mainsail, with this repair, is more than 95%, at least. François had been asked to complete the work by lengthening the broken batten, but he preferred to leave immediately and wait for quieter conditions - Friday morning - to complete the work. But if he realizes that it does not affect the performance of the mainsail, it is not impossible that it remains in the state: the missing piece of batten is only a detail. This Tuesday morning, between 7 am and 11 am, François was riding at 34.9 knots average. We can estimate that it must go ...

    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  6. #16
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    Gabart/Macif

    François Gabart beats the 24 Hour single handed distance record!





    Number: 818* (*: subject to validation by the WSSRC)

    In sailing 818* miles from Monday to Tuesday afternoon, a figure that may yet change this evening, François Gabart has overtaken the legendary limit. He pushed the MACIF trimaran hard to avoid being caught in strong winds behind him and in doing so he became the first single-handed sailor to sail a distance of over 800 miles inside 24 hours. He has pulverized his own record of 784 miles, dating back to 3 July 2016. What was his average? 34 knots, i.e. 63 km/h! What does he think of this? "I'm delighted. Records are made to be beaten. That's how you progress. The sensations at these speeds are pretty extraordinary. The boat flies and there's a blend of power and lightness." Not the sort of guy to rest on his laurels, the skipper of the MACIF trimaran immediately added: "It's not the main goal right now. The idea is to finish this round the world first".


    Object: the batten

    When François Gabart left Brest on Saturday 4 November, at 10:05 AM, he was spared any technical incidents. The first real alert came on Monday, when a mainsail batten broke, forcing him to haul it in and begin a quick repair job which went well. "The batten broke forward (near the mast). Nine centimetres were missing. As there was a little extra astern, I managed to push it forwards. The sailing is not perfectly taut, but it's by no means a bad job. I wanted to avoid sailing with a broken batten as the wind was lifting, as it could have torn the sail and damaged the mast. Often, small do-it-yourself jobs like that don't deteriorate too much if you catch them in time. I have now dealt with the worst of the problem", said the MACIF skipper happily, during a radio session this Tuesday, at the Macif headquarters, in Niort, at which many of the group's employees attended. He also praised the speed at which his team reacted when the damage was identified: "When there's this sort of technical problem, because they know the trimaran so well, they are quicker off the mark than I am, when it comes to finding solutions. It's "Hello Houston, we have a problem!" and back on shore they think of solutions that I work on at sea".





    Place: Roaring Forties

    In the Roaring Forties! Following a little over ten days of racing, François Gabart, who noticed the temperature had lowered by ten degrees in 24 hours, entered the Roaring Forties at midday. These are the latitudes of the Great South and he will stay with them for some time. "It's the start of a long conveyor belt that will take me to the Cape Horn, in places where you really can't come about. It's wonderful to be able to sail in places like this at high speed for days on end". The last routings show him rounding the Cape of Good Hope, the first of three legendary capes, on Thursday morning, setting a time of approximately 12 days. This is roughly two days less than Thomas Coville, the round the world record holder, who rounded it in 14 days, 04 hours, and 44 minutes last year. When we mention this to François Gabart, he can't believe it: "I'm a dreamer, but honestly, 12 days? I wouldn't have dared believe it in my wildest dreams. When we looked at hypotheses at the start, we said that if we reached Good Hope in the same time as Thomas, or even a day later, we would be happy." However, the MACIF skipper doesn't want to get carried away: "It's great to start with a small lead, because this gives us a better chance in the miles to come. Anything is a plus. Now, we just need to stay lucid. There's a long way to go yet. I hope the success will stay with us for the route to come."


    Health: stationary

    With 2 and a half hours of sleep in 24 hours, between Monday and Tuesday, François Gabart has had little sleep. "The business with the mainsail didn't stop me from sleeping, because it didn't last long. It was more because the waves shook me about", he said. But I slept well enough to be properly in form. The rest of the time, I remained lying down, which rested my muscles, especially as I didn't manoeuvre much these last days; just one change of sail". His physical condition is fine, and his mental condition is as good as ever, which will be important when he tackles the Great South, the centrepiece of this round the world.


    After crossing the Equator in just under 6 days, François Gabart has gained considerable speed since he entered the South Atlantic and now has the Cape of Good Hope in his sights. This Tuesday, the skipper of the MACIF trimaran, who succeeded in solving his mainsail batten problem, even beat his own record for the distance sailed in 24 hours, with 818* nautical miles on the clock (record in progress).
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  8. #18
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    675 nm Advance On Round World Pace, 851nm in 24 hours!

    François Gabart beats the record of distance traveled in 24h alone!





    A mythical bar has just fallen: traveling 851 *miles from Monday to Tuesday afternoon, a figure that could still evolve in the evening, François Gabart, who pressed the throttle trimaran MACIF to avoid being caught by too strong winds in his back, is the first solo sailor to pass the 800 miles in 24 hours. He smashed his own record, which was July 3, 2016, 784 miles. His average? 35.4 knots, or 65.5 km / h!

    What does the person think? "I am delighted. Records are made to be beaten, that's how we progress. The sensations at these speeds are quite extraordinary, the boat is flying, it's a mix of power and lightness." Not one to rest on his laurels, the skipper of the MACIF trimaran immediately adds: "Now, this is not the priority objective, the idea is to finish this world tour ..."



    The art of driving a racing car

    851 miles * between Monday and Tuesday evening, François Gabart improved his own 24-hour record, which he held since July 3, 2016 at the helm of the trimaran MACIF. He has Wednesday morning more than 600 miles ahead of the march card Thomas Coville, the record holder of the world tour. If the weather conditions allowed the trimaran MACIF to panic the counters, the skipper also has a preponderant part in these performances, forced to play the balancing act on a wire ...

    *

    If he completes his first round the world multihull, his priority goal since leaving Ushant on Saturday, November 4, the South Atlantic in the direction of the descent will remain almost a fleeting memory for François Gabart. Expected at Bonne-Esperance Thursday morning, it will indeed have remained only 6 days, swallowing this stretch equator-South Africa at very high speeds, which allowed him both to improve his own record of 24 hours (from 784 to 851 miles *), but should also allow him to turn his slight delay on Thomas Coville to the equator (3:34) early when entering the Indian Ocean.


    The keys to this reversal? They are obviously due to the weather conditions that decide whether or not to let the sailor and his skiff pass - and have in this case opened a royal route to trimaran MACIF, managed to cut the cheese as rarely in this region of the globe where the anticyclone St. Helena usually takes his ease. They can also be explained by the mastery of a skipper who, for the past 27 months, has been launching the trimaran MACIF, has been constantly improving its knowledge and control, to the point of fly it today almost with your eyes closed.




    TRACKER
    *

    "The driving on a solo world tour is not done at the helm, it is essentially the autopilot who takes care of that - for example since Monday, I have not touched the helm once," said François Gabart Tuesday, before stating: "The piloting is to find the right angle with respect to the waves and the wind, to ensure that the boat goes quickly in flexibility. This requires a lot of listening to the boat. We must feel the vibrations that are not normal, the suspicious noises, which are often the important signs that we must find a solution to go fast.

    A real tightrope walker on the ocean line that he crosses without having time to greet them, the skipper of the trimaran MACIF must constantly balance the need to release the horses, because he has a record to go to, and to provide a mount whose integrity is a priority to go to the end. "The challenge is to find the right balance between pushing the machine to move forward and not push too hard to not weaken it," he says. And if, at sea, the person concerned is so focused on the performance that he does not have the leisure to torture his mind with this dilemma, on the ground, one is sometimes to implore the skies so that the trimaran MACIF agrees to suspend his flight.

    *

    "Our stress varies depending on the weather," confirms Antoine Gautier, who heads the MACIF team's design office and is part of the routing cell. At high speeds, you never know what can happen. The boat suffers when it is driven to 100% of its potential, it's quite stressful to live. " And it's not over, since if the latter announces "conditions quite handy to pass the Cape of Good Hope", he predicts "potentially very strong wind" for the Indian start ...
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  9. #19
    Hard to fathom, just amazing numbers!

  10. #20
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    François Gabart Sets The Outright Ouessant - Cape Agulhas Record




    Less than two days after pulverising his own 24-hour distance record (851 miles), François Gabart crossed the longitude of Cape Agulhas on Thursday morning at 08.25 AM (UTC+1), which marks the entrance to the Indian Ocean, after just 11 days, 22 hours and 20 minutes at sea. This is an incredible time, since not only has the MACIF trimaran skipper improved the time it took the current record-holder Thomas Coville to pass this point in 2016, by 2 days, 6 hours and 24, but he has also set the best time outright at Cape Agulhas, single-handed and with crew combined!


    This performance by François Gabart in the South Atlantic is outstanding. The MACIF skipper crossed the Equator on Friday 10 November, after 5 days, 20 hours and 45 minutes at sea, slightly behind by 3 hours 35 minutes on the time set by Thomas Coville one year earlier. He then sailed a high-speed diagonal course from the Equator to Cape Agulhas. This Thursday morning, at 08.25 AM he entered the Indian Ocean (he rounded the Cape of Good Hope at 06.15 AM) after 11 days, 22 hours and 20 minutes, which is 2 days and 24 minutes ahead of the time set by Sodebo in 2016, which he beat by roughly two and a half days in the South Atlantic.




    TRACKER



    Better still, on this section from Ouessant to Cape Agulhas, François Gabart has set the best time outright, single-handed and with crew combined, achieving a better time than Banque Populaire V, which took 11 days, 23 hours and 49 minutes to enter the Indian Ocean, in the Jules Verne Trophy in 2014, with a crew of 14 men on board. This is a difference of 1 hour and 29 minutes in favour of MACIF! In all, François Gabart took 6 days, 1 hour and 35 minutes to belt down the South Atlantic. Once again this is a new outright reference time, since Banque Populaire V, the fastest on this Equator-Cape Agulhas section up until now, took 6 days, 8 minutes and 54 seconds, in 2011, while Thomas Coville's time, in 2016, was 8 days, 11 hours and 33 minutes!



    To reach such speeds, MACIF had perfect weather conditions, with a St. Helena anticyclone off to the east and a good low-pressure area off Argentina to drive him forward, which meant he could cut straight through, instead of having to go round, by sailing along the South American coast. At the same time, despite a broken batten, which meant he had to lower the mainsail for a quick repair job, the skipper drove himself very hard, conscious of the opportunity to reach South Africa in a record time. He is now in the Indian Ocean with a comfortable lead on Thomas Coville. This will be a great help, as Coville crossed the Indian Ocean in record time (single-handed) last year, in 8 days, 12 hours and 19 minutes.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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