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Thread: Maserati Mod 70's Next Challenge

  1. #11
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    Squeezing Past Sumatra

    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70‘s Team are less than 300 nautical miles away from the Sunda Strait. After four days, they sailed 1635 nm at an average speed of 18,9 knots and gained a 468 miles lead over the previous record.



    Maserati Multi70 is now located between the islands of Borneo to the West and Sumatra to the East.

    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70‘s crew crossed the Equator this morning at 3:13 am UTC. Then, in order to stay in the pressure, we had to keep on jibing towards the Sunda Strait where we should arrive in about 15 hours (around 22 UTC on January 22nd)” explains Giovanni Soldini. “Then, after the Strait, we will have to see how we will manage to catch the South East trade winds in the Indian Ocean.”



    TRACKER

    Alex Pella explains: “Navigation aboard Maserati Multi70 is going on in this incredible sea of China. It is a real slalom between islands, reefs, atolls, merchant ships and fishing vessels not always well marked. It’s fun from the point of view of pure navigation but it’s not always easy. We have still two difficult passages to do before entering the Indian Ocean. We crossed the Equator last night and we are going on with super conditions, stable wind from the north, flat sea and summer heat.”




    After three days of sailing Maserati Multi70 is about 580 miles from the Sunda Strait, the gate between Java and Sumatra to get into the Indian Ocean. Sailing across the South China Sea and the Java Sea is like a slalom between coral islands in a zone where nautical traffic is quite intense. Moreover, in this part of the route there’s the difficult crossing of the Equator, where the weather conditions are very unstable.

    “We are in an area where the wind is weak” says Giovanni Soldini, “the wind goes from 7 to 9 knots from 30° turning to North: we only have to wait for the right moment to gybe and run away towards South-West. The high pressure zone is East of us, we have to enter in it port tack, look for the wind rotation to North and then get out starboard tack.”


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  2. #12
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    Trucking Across The India Ocean




    Tracker


    After crossing the Sunda Strait, Maserati Multi70 was welcomed in the Indian Ocean by a powerful NW wind, that the trimaran took crosswind, on starboard. The crew sailed the first 450 miles in the ocean like that, slightly below the direct route to South Africa. Now the trimaran is about to cross the heart of a low pressure zone with light winds – this is the last obstacle before reaching the SE trade winds zone.

    Reporting Sebastién Audigane’s words: “We are again under gennaker after a wet and quite fast night. Some birds fly over our head. They are a kind of northern gannet, similar to albatrosses. They play with Maserati Multi70 in front of the forestay, then just above the water surface, in front of the bow or in pairs crossing diagonally in front of us. In few words, the trimaran is the attraction of the day for the Indian’s local population.

    Giovanni Soldini adds: “Since this morning we are crossing a lot of tropical squalls, so we took the opportunity to do some cleaning on board. We are satisfied.”



    We are on the fifth day on Maserati Multi70, we have passed the Straits of the Sonda




    On board the Maserati Multi70 you eat very well! Here is the first typical recipe
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  3. #13
    I really, really, really don't get the point to this one. What a boring record to set. Big egos and big toys I guess....
    Pointing like a traffic cop, footin like a track star.

  4. #14
    Membership in the Record Obscura Club?

  5. #15
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    Day 7. After a week of sailing and 2570 miles traveled, the lead on the previous record rises to 741 miles.

    For Giovanni Soldini and the crew of Maserati Multi70 the second week of the record between Hong Kong and London begins in the Indian Ocean, under the 15th parallel South.

    At this morning ranking, 7:06 UTC, the trimaran Maserati Multi70 recorded average speeds around 30 knots and a distance of 4,000 miles from Good Hope, next buoy on the Hong Kong to London route.

    “The first week went very well”, says Giovanni Soldini, “we have found a good harmony on board. We sailed well and we also had Neptune on our side. We entered the trade winds last night around 18 UTC and we immediately accelerated. We spent the last day between brutal gales and gennaker maneuvers, but we are happy because we are going fast and I think that in the coming days we can make a long way.”





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  6. #16
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    4 Knm To Cape of Good Hope



    TRACKER


    Day 8. At 11 UTC Maserati Multi70 is sailing in the Indian Ocean, at 18°S and 82°E, at 30 knots speed reaching 40 knots peaks. Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70’s crew record a 730 miles advantage over Lionel Lemonchois’ previous record.

    “High speed for Maserati Multi70” says Sébastien Audigane, yesterday at around 14 UTC. “We are going between 25 and 30 knots, we’re extending the stride under the small gennaker. The night has just fallen on the Indian Ocean, there is no one, not even a boat. Only a few flying fishes trapped by the speed of Maserati Multi70 landed in bulk on the net. Tomorrow if we are lucky enough to get one, we could eat it like sushi.”



    Alex Pella adds: “It’s the 7th day of sailing and we already covered a good amount of miles in the Indian. We covered more than 600 miles in 24 hours, even though we were stuck under a huge thick cloud for more than 3 hours. We hope to keep this pace for the next 48 hours as well. The sky is clouded, the temperature inside the boat dropped a little, so we are able to sleep better – sleeping was almost impossible before, because of the heat and the condensation. Our next target is Cape of Good Hope, around 4000 miles ahead of us. It means a lot to us because of its name!”

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  7. #17
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    Lead Evaporates As Maserati Breaks Then Replaces Rudder



    “Unfortunately we hit something at 20 knots of speed and we lost the rudder under the right hull”, explains Giovanni Soldini, skipper of Maserati Multi70. “Luckily we have got one spare with us and it seems there are not too much collateral damage”.

    Soldini continues: “This morning we heard a great blow and we immediately realized that the rudder had broken. We get organized to remove the carbon axis that broke just at the exit of the hull, but the remaining piece came out dangerously and went sideways. Fortunately it seems that it did not cause serious damage. Once the axis was removed, we resumed on our route, without a rudder, heading to 230°, towards the center of the high pressure in front of us that will slow us down in the next 24, 36 hours. We will take advantage of these favourable weather conditions to install the new rudder. Then we will head full speed towards Cape Town”.



    The incident occurred today in the morning, at the beginning of the tenth day of navigation. Maserati Multi70 is located in the Indian Ocean about 3,000 miles from the Cape of Good Hope. Despite the damage, Giovanni Soldini and his crew (Guido Broggi, Sébastien Audigane, Oliver Herrera Perez and Alex Pella) continue to sail fast in the trade winds (around 25 knots average speed), 587 miles ahead of the record to beat.

    Started from Hong Kong on last January 18th, to beat the record set in 2008 by Lionel Lemonchois on board the 100 footer maxi catamaran Gitana 13 (41 days, 21 hours and 26 minutes), the 21.20 meters trimaran Maserati Multi70 must complete the 13000 nautical miles route and cut the finish line under the Queen Elisabeth II bridge over the River Thames before 1 March.


    *********************************





    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi70‘s crew have successfully completed the replacement of the starboard rudder which broke yesterday morning following a collision with an unidentified floating object. To be able to carry out this hard operation, they had to enter a zone of high pressure with little wind and a calm sea.

    “The assembly of the spare rudder went well“, explains Giovanni Soldini. “We managed to install it on the first try and we didn’t lose much time. Maserati Multi 70 is back at 100% and we are happy. Now, we are on our way to Cape Town.“




    In the coming days, the crew expects to face tough weather conditions. Soldini explains: “For the day 2 February we are waiting for the passage of a cold front associated with a depression that could be violent, with winds of 40 knots and more. We will try to position ourselves as well as possible to take favorable but not too strong winds.“

    At today’s ranking (13.32 UTC), beginning of the twelfth day of navigation, Maserati is about 2000 miles east of Cape of Good Hope.




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    A Change In The Weather




    “It looks like the South”, says Sébastien Audigane at 14.50 UTC. “Maserati sails at 35° South and since this morning the albatrosses are there, the big ones, imperial, always majestic. They fly with other smaller albatrosses and brown plumage.”

    “Apart from the albatrosses, with Maserati we passed an empty tanker this morning and crossed a big cargo ship yesterday by night.”

    “It’s a little cold on board with that wind from South East, we pulled out boots and fleece jackets. The day started quite bumpy, broad reaching (110° twa) the wind veered and we’re getting down the waves under gennaker and j2.”

    “In about six hours we will jibe, heading west under the full moon.”






    http://maserati.soldini.it/cartography/
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  9. #19
    Looks like they will get a nice window to pass the cape!

  10. #20
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    +521 miles at 8:21 UTC this morning: Maserati Multi 70‘s advantage has grown again (120 miles earned in the last 12 hours) on Lionel Lemonchois, holder of the Hong Kong-London record. The trimaran is still rushing at more than 30 knots of average speed. The trimaran is sailing at 38°S of latitude and at 44°E of longitude (South of Madagascar). The Cape of Good Hope, a true turning point halfway through the route, is less than 1,200 miles away. “We think we will pass the Cape on February 2nd around 20/21 UTC”, explains Giovanni Soldini.







    The route to reach it is still very complex: “there is a first cold front to be negotiated in the next few hours” continues Giovanni Soldini explains: “we are cuurently sailing with a wind blowing from the north, crossbeam, and we’re heading west. We’re ahead of a cold front with 25/30 knots. In a few hours when we will be on the other side, we will find South, South Eastern winds.”

    Then, as anticipated by the same Soldini yesterday, a second cold front even more active is expected for 2 february around 6 am, when the trimaran will be near the coastline, above the continental shelf, where shoals might create a very difficult sea state.

    Baptized Cape of Storms by Bartolomeo Diaz, the first navigator to have reached it in 1487, ten years before Vasco de Gama, first one to have passed it during his voyage to India, Good Hope is fully justifying his reputation.





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