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Thread: The New Concept Is Revealed!

  1. #1
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    The New Concept Is Revealed!



    An exciting new era in America’s Cup racing has been unveiled today as the concept for the AC75, the class of boat to be sailed in the 36th America’s Cup is released illustrating a bold and modern vision for high performance fully foiling monohull racing yachts.


    The Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa design teams have spent the last four months evaluating a wide range of monohull concepts. Their goals have been to design a class that will be challenging and demanding to sail, rewarding the top level of skill for the crews; this concept could become the future of racing and even cruising monohulls beyond the America's Cup.


    The AC75 combines extremely high-performance sailing and great match racing with the safety of a boat that can right itself in the event of a capsize. The ground-breaking concept is achieved through the use of twin canting T-foils, ballasted to provide righting-moment when sailing, and roll stability at low speed.







    The normal sailing mode sees the leeward foil lowered to provide lift and enable foiling, with the windward foil raised out of the water to maximise the lever-arm of the ballast and reduce drag. In pre-starts and through manoeuvres, both foils can be lowered to provide extra lift and roll control, also useful in rougher sea conditions and providing a wider window for racing.


    Although racing performance has been the cornerstone of the design, consideration has had to be focused on the more practical aspects of the boat in the shed and at the dock, where both foils are canted right under the hull in order to provide natural roll stability and to allow the yacht to fit into a standard marina berth.


    An underlying principle has been to provide affordable and sustainable technology ‘trickle down’ to other sailing classes and yachts. Whilst recent America's Cup multihulls have benefitted from the power and control of rigid wing sails, there has been no transfer of this technology to the rigs of other sailing classes. In tandem with the innovations of the foiling system, Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa are investigating a number of possible innovations for the AC75's rig, with the requirement that the rig need not be craned in and out each day. This research work is ongoing as different concepts are evaluated, and details will be released with the AC75 Class Rule before March 31st, 2018.





    The America's Cup is a match race and creating a class that will provide challenging match racing has been the goal from the start. The AC75 will foil-tack and foil-gybe with only small manoeuvring losses, and given the speed and the ease at which the boats can turn the classic pre-starts of the America's Cup are set to make an exciting comeback. Sail handling will also become important, with cross-overs to code zero sails in light wind conditions.


    A huge number of ideas have been considered in the quest to define a class that will be extremely exciting to sail and provide great match racing, but the final decision was an easy one: the concept being announced was a clear winner, and both teams are eager to be introducing the AC75 for the 36th America's Cup in 2021.

    The AC75 class rule will be published by March 31st 2018.






    GRANT DALTON, CEO Emirates Team New Zealand:

    “We are really proud to present the concept of the AC75 today. It has been a phenomenal effort by Dan and the guys together with Luna Rossa design team and there is a lot of excitement building around the boat in the development and getting to this point.”

    “Our analysis of the performance of the foiling monohulls tells us that once the boat is up and foiling, the boat has the potential to be faster than an AC50 both upwind and downwind.”

    “Auckland is in for a highly competitive summer of racing in 2020 / 2021.”


    DAN BERNASCONI, Design Coordinator Emirates Team New Zealand:

    “This design process has been new territory for the team, starting with a clean sheet to develop a class - and we've loved it. We wanted to see how far we could push the performance of monohull yachts to create a foiling boat that would be challenging to sail and thrilling to match race. We're really excited about the concept and can't wait to see it on the water..

    We think we have achieved these goals - thanks also to the constructive co-operation of Luna Rossa design team - as well as the more practical detail to consider in terms of cost management and logistics of running the boats.”

    PATRIZIO BERTELLI, Chairman of Luna Rossa Challenge:

    “The choice of a monohull was a fundamental condition for us to be involved again in the America’s Cup. This is not a return to the past, but rather a step towards the future: the concept of the new AC 75 Class, which Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa design teams have developed together, will open new horizons for racing yachts, which, in the future, may also extend to cruising. It is a modern concept, at the high end of technology and challenging from a sporting point of view, which will deliver competitive and exciting match racing. I would like to thank both design teams for their commitment in achieving, in just four months, the goal which we had established when we challenged”.

    MAX SIRENA. Team Director of Luna Rossa Challenge:

    “As a sailor I am very pleased of the concept jointly developed by both design teams: the AC 75 will be an extremely high-performance yacht, challenging to sail, who will require an athletic and very talented crew. Every crew member will have a key role both in the manoeuvres and in racing the boat; the tight crossings and the circling in the pre-starts – which are part of the America’s Cup tradition – will be back on show, but at significant higher speeds. It is a new concept, and I am sure that its development will bring interesting surprises”.
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  2. #2
    Aint gonna make the old school folk happy, but if it works and doesn't decapitate anyone,
    full steam ahead!

  3. #3
    Just when I thought the AC couldn't get any dumber.....
    Pointing like a traffic cop, footin like a track star.

  4. #4
    I wonder how that will work in lumpy seas?

  5. #5
    Opens up new sponsorship possibilities with Gillette, Schick, Norelco, Braun, etc. Maybe Noxzema will make a marketing comeback.

  6. #6
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    INsight To New ETNZ Monohull Foiler Concept

    Richard Gladwell of Sail-World gets the goods from ETNZ Design Leader Dan Bernasconi...





    Despite admitting that the foiling AC75 monohull is a first for the sailing world, Emirates Team New Zealand design team leader, Dan Bernasconi, is confident that the concept will work in practice.

    The style of the foiling AC75 has never been seen before in sailing. The closest are the IMOCA60’s, but they are only using the DSS style foils to reduce hull drag and increase speed.

    Under the AC75 concept, the whole hull will lift clear of the water, supported by two or three of the foils.

    'We have done a lot of simulation work on it. We are very confident as to how the boat is going to behave. But of course, until we actually see it on the water, we won't understand it completely.”

    In fact, Dan Bernasconi has such confidence in the simulation software that he doesn't think there is any point in testing in a prototype of the AC75.





    'The Protocol allows test boats up to 12 metres long. So teams have the option of whether to build a test boat small scale. I think some teams will do that. But in terms of timing, it takes almost as long to design a 12-metre boat as it does to design a 75ft boat.

    “It is not something that you could go through the full cycle of designing building sailing a small boat and then start work on a bigger boat. I think that reduces the benefits you would get from a test boat. However, it may be something that we or other teams consider.

    The AC75 is coincidentally almost the same length as the International America’s Cup Class which was the class of choice for five America’s Cups between 1992 - 2007.

    But instead of being a heavy displacement specialist match racing yacht which could be beaten around the track by most 50fters, the 2021 America’s Cup class will be one of the fastest yachts on the Planet.

    'We are really excited about it. We've worked on dozens of concepts across the scale. We are really pleased that we were able to get enough confidence with this one which is at the real high-performance end of the scale. We were keen to push this concept forward, both with our team and the guys at Luna Rossa. In the end, it was an easy decision.'





    Same speed or faster than AC50

    After the 2010 America’s Cup when San Francisco’s Golden Gate Yacht Club announced that the 2013 Match would be contested in 72ft wingsailed catamarans, many questioned the direction being taken by the sport’s premier event.

    With the change to a smaller wingsailed catamaran designed for foiling, the AC50 became the bench mark against which any new America’s Cup Class will be measured.

    'In 20kts of breeze I imagine the AC75 will be close to the speed of an AC50,” Bernasconi told Sail-World from England where he is talking design with potential America’s Cup teams.

    “The AC75 is a bigger boat, with a bigger rig and more righting moment. With the AC75, the righting moment stays constant as you go through the windspeed range - so in the mid-windspeed range, once you are foiling in 9-15kts of breeze there is definitely the potential to be quicker than an AC50. And at the top end of the windspeed, the two will come back into line and could be quite similar.

    “On the other hand, we don't have rudder differential. The AC50's had the windward elevator pulling down, which at the top end of the windspeed range continued to increase righting moment”, he adds.

    Righting moment and lift
    The visually diverting aspect of the AC75 is the foil each side which will serve alternately as a hydrofoil generating lift and as a lever producing righting moment.

    Foils aside the AC75 is a relatively normal monohull, with a conventional hull, a rig that is not dissimilar to other high-performance yachts and will be sailed with a crew of 12.

    There is a sharp turn away from the direction of the AC50. Cyclors have been replaced with grinders, the use of hydraulics has been reduced, and the only concession to stored power is in the mechanism to raise or lower the side foils.

    Having just begun to understand how daggerboard style foils worked, America’s Cup fans now have to grasp a whole new set of foiling concepts to understand what will make an AC75 tick.

    'The leeward foil produces lift”, Bernasconi explains. “We expect that it will have trim tabs on it rather than changing the rake angle of the whole foil as we have done on the AC50. Those trim tabs would be controlled by one of the sailors to control the ride height.

    “You still need lift control on the rudder, like in an AC50 or Moth. You still need control on both the main lifting surface and the rudder. Whether we rake the whole rudder as we did on the AC50 or whether we control trim tabs on the rudder which is fixed in rake is still something we are considering. We are looking at both options for that.”


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  7. #7
    Can't believe they would forego the prototype.

  8. #8
    Will be interesting to see how many syndicates sign on.

  9. #9
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    AC75 Class Rule has been published



    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and Circolo della Vela Sicilia, together with their respective teams Emirates Team New Zealand and the Challenger of Record - Luna Rossa, published the AC75 Class Rule for the 36th America’s Cup today.

    The AC75 Class Rule defines the parameters within which teams can design a yacht eligible to compete in the 36th America’s Cup. It regulates all aspects of the boat to ensure fair and exciting racing, whilst leaving plenty of freedom for innovation to flourish.

    The development of the Class Rule has been a four-month process led by Emirates Team New Zealand, working together with Luna Rossa Challenge.

    “We are pleased to publish the Class Rule on time as per the Protocol. It has been a detailed collaboration with the Challenger of Record on all aspects of the rule, including the one design and supplied parts. We feel we have done a great job containing costs on certain aspects, while leaving the rule open enough for the America’s Cup to continue as the driving force of innovation and technology in sailing,” said Dan Bernasconi, Design Coordinator for Emirates Team New Zealand.




    Highlights of the AC75 Class Rule include:

    Strict limitations on the number of components that can be built including hulls, masts, rudders, foils, and sails, thus encouraging teams to do more R&D in simulation and subsequently less physical construction and testing

    Supplied foil arms and cant system to save design time and construction costs

    Supplied rigging

    One design mast tube

    In addition, the ‘soft wing’ mainsail concept that has been developed for the AC75 Class Rule is expected to have a trickle-down effect on sailing in the future.



    “The AC75 Class Rule sets the parameters for the teams to develop and race the fastest sailing monohull on earth. The rules are the result of a close collaboration and a true partnership between Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa,” said Martin Fischer, Design Coordinator for Luna Rossa Challenge.






    “This marks a definite milestone and a turning point from developing the rule to developing the boat,” said Dan Bernasconi. “Overnight we have to completely change our thinking, from trying to write a fair rule, to doing our best to design the fastest boat within the constraints of the rule. We have to stop thinking about what we intended the rule to mean, and start trying to pick it apart for what the words actually say - and see where there might be room to squeeze some advantage.”


    This will be the same for the best minds in yacht design and technology across all of the teams who will begin to reveal their innovations 31 March 2019 when the first AC75 yachts can be launched

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  10. #10


    The Cooling Lizard Boat

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