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Thread: 2018 SSS Single Handed Transpac

  1. #11

  2. #12
    Pretty impressive for 1st SHTP!

  3. #13
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    3 Boats Now In HanaLei



    Gregory Ashby's Wilderness 30' Nightmare and David Clark's Olson 30' have joined
    Phillipe Jamotte's Olson 30' Double Espresso at anchor in Hanalei Bay as the 1st 3 boats
    to complete the 2018 Single Handed Transpac. As of this writing, Double Espresso maintains
    the lead on corrected time. Unclear if any of the higher raters can knock him off his perch at this point.



    Crinan II is next boat expected in, followed by Rainbow

    TRACKER







    News From The Fleet:

    The parties in Mike’s head
    another morning of sailing dead down wind. its a little challenging because my boat begins to dislike the full main at about 21 kts tws depending a bit on sea state. last night i was humming along with full main 20 kts reasonable sea state good boat speed so decided to get some sack time. rude awakening sometime later with my tws alarm going off, the boat jumping and complaining and me sitting there in the bunk thinking “remind me where i am again” answer, you are in a sailboat about to do another reef Mr. Cunningham…NOW WOULD BE GOOD! You untangled those reefing lines earlier right? Sir, yes Sir. by now you may be wondering how many actual people are on the boat. well there’s Mr. Yellowcoat protecting the forward cabin, a Marine Drill Instructor kicking my ass, and a bunch of talking chipmunks who get pretty chatty when i get short on sleep. i also continue to be on board and am, in fact, doing all the work. rcvs 9:38am PDT 7/6

    Mike Chamberlain
    Freedom 30
    Jacgueline

    *****************************************

    Fugu still has power!

    Saw Riff Rider today he had AP broken the last two days! I’d been feeling sorry one of my solar panels failed and i had been hand steering to nurse amp hours

    Sun today! First in a week so battery are full this evening happy times! Also first warm day thought warm would not wait till 400 miles off the islands to be

    Chris Case
    Wilderness 30
    FUGU

    ****************************************


    “It’s pretty nice out here” says Dolfin Bill
    I can’t tell you how wonderful it is out here today because that might jinx us. So I won’t mention the warm, steady trades blowing 15-20, the seas smoothing as the cross swell diminishes, the beginning of puffy tradewind clouds, the vast expanse of the sea all around with no hint of the distant civilization over the horizon, just the soft moan of the wind, the sound of breaking waves and of clear blue seas rushing past Dolfin”s hull. I can’t tell you any of this because then Mother Nature might take it away.

    But I can tell you is it’s pretty nice out here.

    DolfinBill

    *****************************************

    Mike and his AP

    i have had an interesting voyage of discovery with my ray ev1 AP. the pilot has three settings: performance, cruising and leisure. i have found them more like Chihuahua on drugs, Chihuahua on less drugs and “the dude”. the Chihuahuas consume power like crazy and steer downwind as their name implies, whacky and somewhat demented. they do stuff, you just go….what??? “the dude” however is perfect downwind. just like you would expect after a few White Russians. i wish i had discovered “the dude”three days ago.

    *******************************************


    Sir! Yes Sir!
    another morning of sailing dead down wind. its a little challenging because my boat begins to dislike the full main at about 21 kts tws depending a bit on sea state. last night i was humming along with full main 20 kts reasonable sea state good boat speed so decided to get some sack time. rude awakening sometime later with my tws alarm going off, the boat jumping and complaining and me sitting there in the bunk thinking “remind me where i am again” answer, you are in a sailboat about to do another reef Mr. Cunningham…NOW WOULD BE GOOD!
    You untangled those reefing lines earlier right? Sir, yes Sir.

    by now you may be wondering how many actual people are on the boat. well there’s Mr. Yellowcoat protecting the forward cabin, a Marine Drill Instructor kicking my ass, and a bunch of talking chipmunks who get pretty chatty when i get short on sleep. i also continue to be on board and am, in fact, doing all the work.

    Mike Chamberlain
    Freedom 30
    Jacgueline
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  4. #14
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Postcards From The Edge

    Hanalei is fun, SHTP racers are arriving
    by rob macfarlane

    Beetle has been happily riding at anchor in Hanalei now for the week, the holding is excellent - thick mud and sand - and there are fewer boats here than I would have thought though there are permanent moorings in place for the commercial boats; those moorings weren't here that I recall from 2006 (last time I was here).

    In Nawiliwili you get to enjoy sunrises; around this side of the island you get to enjoy sunsets, especially as the eastern corner of the bay doesn't poke out too far north.



    Beetle is hanging out relaxing on the lovely blue waters of the bay. I get to walk up and down the beach when going ashore to visit Race Committee or the grocery store in the center-of-town Ching Young Village, which has the Big Save grocery store.

    The anchorage is reasonably rolly, particularly when the trades are up and blowing hard, but everybody is managing to stay stuck to the bottom despite the squalls that roll through and toss the wind around. The reef extending out in front of the resort protects the anchorage and the standup paddle board folks are out riding the small breakers on the inside of the reef. If you're a better standup paddle board person then you're on the bigger waves on the outside of the reef. And all the boaters hide inside behind the reef.

    The flood damage to Hanalei is still very much in evidence, the road to the paved boat launch ramp has not been worked on yet and it's missing in three or four places where the water cut through the area and left ten foot deep trenches. The large houses that were right in the area are still in their fallen-over state, other houses are being worked on or torn down and rebuilt entirely.




    The road to the launch ramp as it is now. The Hanalei river, where the dinghies land, is a short distance behind me as I take the picture. It rained hard in Hanalei in April, the gauge recorded 28" over 24 hours and then the gauge broke - all that water came sweeping down the valley and over-ran the river bank and flooded out the community.




    Many houses were undermined and the pillar foundations (intended to keep the homes above hurricane-driven ocean water) started to collapse. It's going to be a long time before everything is put back together. The launch ramp road is directly behind these homes.


    As a result of the flooding the river mouth is not used by the commercial boats, as they can not load and unload passengers from the old ramp - can't drive there. Instead the boats are using the beach adjacent to the Hanalei Pier and folks wade out to the boats that have backed in to the beach with the motors lifted; when the boats ground out in the sand one of the crew jumps out, extends a ladder, and folks are helped up onto the boat. Good thing the surf is low at 1 foot and it's a steep shelving sand beach so the boats can back in quite close. It's a 10 minute walk down the beach to the Hanalei Pavilion park, which is the beach access route that's gets you between the houses that line the beach. The number of tourists on Kauai is impressive - 100,000 people per month come in through the airport at Lihue, that 1.2 million per year according to the Hawaii tourist bureau. And it's a fair bet that some of those tourist folks make it to Hanalei at the far end of the island (in all fairness, most of them go to the resorts and hotels on the south side of the island - it's not that particularly crowded in Hanalei proper). I hope those 100,000 people are also flying out each month, otherwise it would be standing room only on the island.



    The Big Save is the important store in the town of Hanalei - this is where everyone comes to get their groceries. When the flooding happened it was 18" deep in mud and water, but stayed open so people could get food and water.

    The Singlehanded Transpacific race finishes here, and so far three boats have arrived. Race Committee got in earlier in the week and located their rental house that happens to be directly behind the Pavilion - most convenient for getting down to the chase boat that is sent out to greet each arriving yacht as they cross the finish line located outside the reef. The chase boat's job is to take out one or two people that will climb onboard the incoming boat and help the skipper take down the sails and get the anchor ready. The chase boat is also used as a follow-me boat, especially at night when the skipper is entering an unknown bay and needs to avoid the reefs located on each side. General cruising approach is to never enter an unknown, unlit, reef-containing bay at night; the chase boat makes it safer for the racer to get in as all they have to do is follow the chase boat around to the anchorage.

    First order of business for Race Committee is to get the chase boat setup; turns out that Larry's Sea Swirl (affectionately referred to as the Sea Squirrel) was all set, launched, and then the somewhat elderly Evinrude 88 HP outboard motor wouldn't start. The first finisher was that night, so I was able to help out with Beetle's dinghy and take Synthia out to greet Philippe as he finished the race on his Olson 30 Double Espresso - first boat in! I greeted Synthia at 4AM just outside the small surf line at the Pavilion, she waded out to the dinghy and we went out and Philippe as he crossed the line in the pre-dawn glow. Synthia went on board to help Philippe and I zipped along in front so he could just follow the dinghy rather than worry about avoiding the reefs.

    The funny part was inside at the anchorage, Synthia inspected his bow and noticed there weren't any cleats up there, so asked, "How do you normally anchor?" and he responded, "I don't know, I've never anchored the boat before." That was novel. We eventually decided to tie the anchor line to the mast with a big bowline, and then used the jib tack hooks as the cleat. Hopefully that doesn't pull the stem fitting out of the bow.



    Philippe on his Olson 30 Double Espresso in the bright morning light. That's the Pavilion directly beyond and to the right of his mast - the Tree is now huge and filled with branches, it is occupying the right side of the frame. Too bad the picnic table was removed from beneath the tree - we're not sure where to have sunset Tree Time now.

    Last night two more boats came in, fortunately the Sea Squirrel's outboard was professionally serviced and we aren't depending on Beetle's little dinghy to charge around in the dark out in the ocean. Tonight we're expecting the fourth boat, maybe around midnight or so. Don on board Crinan II is having complete autopilot meltdown and has been hand-steering his Wylie 30 for several hundred miles, working on 3-4 hours in the cockpit then taking down the sail and drifting for 3-4 hours while he sleeps. This is not the fast way to get here but both his electric pilots have failed and Crinan II doesn't have a mechanical windvane backup system. So he's slow but will arrive. I know Don from many years of racing OYRA and SSS in San Francisco, it will be fun to meet up with him again here in Hanalei!



    This is the Olson 30 Passages shortly after finishing the race, following the follow-me Sea Squirrel in to drop the anchor. It's dark out here, this shot was taken with the Nikon set at a silly ASA 10000 to capture anything in the dark. The boats are being anchored right around Beetle, which is beginning to make Beetle feel like the Mama Goose for the fleet.

    The Race Committee's house is the social gathering point for the fleet, I've been going over there around 5pm for pre-Tree time to observe Synthia and Dave work on preparing the approved SSS mai-tai drinks, apparently that involves a fair bit of experimentation and testing.



    Mai Tai's apparently require lots of attention to prepare properly. Here at Race Central Dave and Jackie look up recipes while Synthia works with the ingredients at hand to see what they can concoct.

    So all is going well here, we're having intermittent sun and squalls with rain, the Kauai Napali coast mountains are right in of the anchorage, I've been working on giving Beetle a good bottom scrub and enjoying seeing friends from the racing community again.




    Sunset over the Pacific, a great way to an end a day in a beautiful place.

    - rob

    https://tbeetle.wordpress.com/2018/0...-are-arriving/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  5. #15

  6. #16
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    7 In, 9 To Go!






    TRACKER




    Mike’s Lists
    Last night at sea, knock on wood. Easy to find aboard Jacqueline because every last piece is squeaking.

    Beautiful evening with Dolfin’s lights in sight. Hard to believe we can see each other after 2144 nm at sea.

    Now I have turned my attention to obsessing about finish to do’s. I often wonder if I am some sort of to do list obsessive/compulsive. No to do list? Get that on a to do list pronto. I have little scraps of paper all over the boat with cryptic tasks which i cant even remember what they are. My handwriting doesn’t help. “go get the tractor fabricated” what the hell was that? probably important.

    New to do…Improve handwriting.

    ***************************

    Update from Dark Horse 7.7 9:15 PM PST
    Tonight is my last night at sea. The trades have been very steady, around 20 knots with some squalls up to 30 knots. I have just the mainsail up and trucking along, the boat and autopilot have been dealing with it pretty good. It has given me some time to recover and fix some things. I got my solar charging at a sufficient rate after I lost one panel. I had to rewire a controller back to the battery. I have also had time to read “Not a yacht club”, which is a great book and I am very proud to be part of the SSS. I also found time to read “Experiment in Survival”, an interesting book. Seems like a lot of trouble for a publicity stunt.

    I am really excited to get to Hawaii and see everyone and start eating again! I’m really looking forward to tree time. Looking back at the trip, I was expecting to say the hardest part of it was leaving, but I can’t say that. There have been some very challenging, emotionally and physically, times over the last 2 weeks. Overall I am really happy with the boat and how it performed. The biggest thing I would change is to bring a whisker pole. Not having one really reduced my miles in these conditions leaving me to be under a main more than I would like. With the heavier conditions, it was too risky for my to fly a spinnaker. 20 knots was my limit. I was expecting to do a lot more spinnaker work, but it didn’t allow for it. I also expected it to be a lot warmer. It really didn’t get warm until 4 days ago.

    I am happy with how dry my boat has been, the bilge hasn’t even filled up once! Thanks to the dodger, and new hatches and all the work I put into sealing all the holes. It sure makes a big difference psychologically having a dry place to go to and sleep. I am happy with my autopilots and electrical system. Everything ran perfectly and I had plenty of power.

    Next time I would bring more fleece pants and long underwear. I also would provision a little more differently too. The same meal gets pretty boring and then I don’t want to eat. I spent today cleaning up the boat and packing bags that go ashore so I can just anchor and head to the beach. It will be a dream come true tomorrow, hopefully the squalls won’t be too bad tonight.

    2 days ago I came across a group of dolphins, there must have been hundreds of them. They would swim along the boat and jump right in front of it, kind of playing with it. This went on for about a half hour, sailing along with all these dolphins in the middle of the sea, it was a very unique experience I won’t ever forget. Reminds me of a time I was working on a ranch that borders Yellowstone National Park, and after a long day of fixing fence up in a high mountain pasture, I was riding home across a hay field and came across a herd of 400 elk. Next thing you know I was loping my horse in the middle of this herd of elk across a field. There was nothing like that in the world. Purely living in the moment.
    Well, that’s all for now, gotta get things set up for night squall sailing!
    Shad

    **************************


    Mike Reflects…
    one of the great challenges of this race is to understand far you can push your boat without breaking her or you.

    i am finding the experience from my first shtp to be invaluable in this regard. i am much more comfortable with how the boat will perform in various conditions and this gives me a little more mental space to optimize and experiment with various configurations.

    i look back and wonder why i did or did not do certain things and realize i was just set up with a pair of training wheels the last race.

    ********************************

    Mike complains. And complains. And complains
    blowing 22 to 25 kts out here while you guys schmooze and drink mai tais. that's not right. to add insult to injury, i am back to the third reef. come on, i am 200 short miles from the garden isle, give me a break. and no cold beer. and no internet…….the humanity and lots of squalls too, and crappy food

    *******************************


    Day 13 Summary – back to the trades
    Today saw the finishes of Passages and Nightmare, congrats to them! The rest of the fleet saw lighter more manageable conditions and sentiment traded back to how great the sailing is, except for the poor sods who have AP or electric issues. They kinda stayed at the “just get me to Hanalei” mindset. Folks in this category are Crinan II, who hand steers and stops to rest, Riff Rider is doing the same, and Fugu who, with full sun, did manage to get some power and some rest from hand steering to conserve amp hours. The latter two crossed paths with each other today. Crinan II will be the next to finish tonight.

    The comfort clump continued to enjoy great conditions and they are still seeing good wind. Dark Horse continued sprinting ahead and now has fewer miles to go than JouJou – quite a show. Morning Star has less than 550 miles to go and then this race will move into history. Winds are forecast to lighten up over the next few days, lets hope a lot of distance is traveled before then.

    *******************************

    ATTACK OF THE KILLER TOMATOES!!
    Jacqueline was attacked today by a school of 36 squid who boarded without permission and proceeded to paint my boat brown. i know how many there were because, lucky for them, i threw them all back. one or two flying fish are fine but a school of squid….come on
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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