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Thread: Golden Globe Race Ushers In July

  1. #71
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    Day 113 – news update

    Loïc Lepage rescue update
    Susie Goodall survives ‘horrific’ storm
    Igor Zaretskiy suffers broken forestay
    Uku Randmaa ETA Hobart Gate Oct 26. Susie Goodall, Nov 1
    Dateline 16:30 UTC 22.10.2018 – Hobart, Tasmania

    Loïc Lepage rescue update
    French solo yachtsman Loïc Lepage is expected to be evacuated from his dismasted yacht Laaland shortly after first light on Tuesday (23:30 UTC Monday). By then both the bulk carrier Shiosai and the sailing yacht Alizes II will have reached Laaland’s position in the South Indian Ocean some 670 miles SW of Perth Western Australia, and will await the arrival of an Australian P-8A search and rescue plane overhead before starting the rescue operation.

    The forecast for the region is good – 15-20 knot winds and a 3 metre swell. The primary plan is for Lepage to be recovered from his liferaft tethered on a long line to his dismasted yacht, by a boat crew from the bulk carrier Shiosai. Francis Tolan, skipper of the S/V Alizes II, a Beneteau Ocean 43 competing in the Long Route solo circumnavigation will providie backup. If conditions prove adverse, then the MV Shiosai may provide a weather lee for Alizes II to conduct the transfer instead.

    Lepage has been fully briefed by GGR Organisers and will evacuate wearing his survival suit and carrying a second EPIRB on standby, VHF radio, personal location beacon and his grab bag. He has set up a bright strobe light on deck and rigged his Echomax inflatable SOLAS radar reflector 2 metres off the deck.

    The 62-year old Frenchman from Vannes has also cut away all rigging so that there are no water hazards around the yacht, and has his engine ready to start should he be called to manoeuvre his boat. Both Satphone and VHF radio are on standby for incoming communications.

    The Australian P-8A search and rescue plane will remain on station until the evacuation has been completed.

    Susie Goodall survives ‘ horrific’ storm
    In a satphone call to Race HQ today, British skipper Susie Goodall spoke for the first time about a ‘horrendous’ few days when her Rustler 36 yacht DHL Starlight was caught in a horrific Southern Ocean storm some 250 miles south of Cape Leeuwin, Australia.

    The storm developed just as suddenly and with the same ferocity as the one that led to Gregor McGuckin and Abhilash Tomy being rolled and dismasted two weeks ago. “The storm really kicked in between 9pm and 9am. I had 70knot winds and 13 metre seas. They were nasty…practically vertical with breaking crests. I don’t know how we got through it. My self-steering broke and I had to hand-steer for 7 hours. We suffered several knock-downs and I feared that we might get rolled at any time.”

    Susie explained that everything was soaked through above and below deck including bunk cushions and her sleeping back. “I definitely lost some weight during the storm because I couldn’t leave the helm to eat and I am now constantly cold and can’t get warm.”

    Her hands suffered particularly. “I’ve never had such soft hands” she joked, adding “They are not a pretty sight. They are covered in sores and cuts, and now taped up to keep the salt out.“

    With the storm closing in around her, Susie took the decision to turn round and head back west and get herself in the better sector. She didn’t escape the big winds but at least she had them hitting her from one direction only before passing overhead. What did for McGuckin and Tomy were the countering seas caused by the winds swinging through 180°. As a result, Susie may well boast that she is the first solo sailor to have passed by Cape Leeuwin three times during a circumnavigation! “I’m just glad the boat is still going.” She admitted

    The storm has now passed but left an ugly sea, making it impossible for the moment to repair her wind vane self-steering. “It’s working but not very well. It will only hold a course on a beam reach, so I am having to hand steer with little sail up at the moment.”

    With 1,000 miles to go to the Boatshed.com Hobart film drop, Susie is predicting an ETA on November 1st.

    Igor Zaretskiy suffers broken forestay
    Russian skipper Igor Zaretskiy sailing the Endurance 35 Esmeralda, now trailing at the back of the fleet, almost 6,000 miles behind race leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede, was forced to spend 4 hours at the top of his mast, repairing a forestay fitting. In a message to his team, he said “I thought I might die because the waves were breaking over the boat.”

    On his return to deck Igor reported that he had lost all feeling in his hands and feet and has since been resting up in his bunk. That explains his very slow progress in recent days, but the Russian says that he is now looking forward to get sailing again and today’s tracker plot shows Esmeralda making 4.3 knots in the right direction again.

    Both he and 7th placed Australian Mark Sinclair (Lello 34 Coconut) have some catching up to do even to beat Sir Robin Knox-Johnston’s relative position in Suhaili 50 years ago. The Tracker now shows Suhaili as being more than a day ahead of them.

    Jean-Luc Van Den Heede sailing the Rustler 36 Matmut, is now well out in the Pacific, enjoying a 2 week lead over 2nd placed Mark Slats (Ohpen Maverick) who left the BoatShed.com Hobart film gate behind yesterday. Speaking via Satphone to Race HQ today, the 73-year old Frenchman reported “Good winds today and yesterday…I try to go as fast as possible.” He made repairs to his gennaker and was full of praise for his Hydrovane self-steering. “In a gale it has a big advantage because it is not steering the boat’s rudder, but has its own. This little rudder is far more efficient than the big rudder.”

    The next GGR skipper to pass through the BoatShed.com Hobart film gate will be Estonian Uku Randmaa (Rustler 36 One and All). His current ETA is Friday 26th October, followed by Susie Goodall on1st November.

    Latest positions at 16:30 UTC today 22.10.18

    Jean- Luc VDH (FRA)Rustler 36 Matmut
    Mark Slats (NED)Rustler 36 Ohpen Maverick
    Uku Randmaa (EST) Rustler 36 One and All
    Susie Goodall (GBR) Rustler 36 DHL Starlight
    Istvan Kopar (USA) Tradewind 35 Puffin
    Tapio Lehtinen (FIN) Gaia 36 Asteria
    Mark Sinclair (Aus) Lello 34 Coconut
    Igor Zaretskiy (RUS) Endurance 35 Esmeralda
    RETIRED

    Ertan Beskardes (GBR) Rustler 36 Lazy Otter
    Kevin Farebrother (AUS) Tradewind 35 Sagarmatha
    Nabil Amra (PAL) Biscay 36 Liberty II
    Antoine Cousot (FRA) Biscay 36 Métier Intérim
    Philippe Péché (FRA) Rustler 36 PRB
    Are Wiig (NOR) OE 32 Olleanna
    Gregor McGuckin (IRE) Biscay 36 Hanley Energy Endurance
    Abhilash Tomy (IND) Suhaili replica Thuriya
    Francesco Cappelletti (ITA) Endurance 35 007
    Loïc Lepage (FRA) Nicholson 32 Laaland
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    Oct 24 Update: Loïc Lepage Safe



    https://goldengloberace.com/livetracker/

    FRENCH LANGUAGE UPDATE 24/10/2018 : #GGR2018

    While Mark Slats is already running from the Tasman Sea, which separates New Zealand from Tasmania, to nearly 7 knots in a good south-West wind that will strengthen tomorrow by passing North - West after a short period of calm, Jean-Luc van den heede always opens 2000 miles in front of the Pacific Road, which has calmed down a lot since this weekend. The leader of the race is now sliding on a calm sea, almost 6,5 knots in the last few hours. And this comfortable (but relatively fast) Navigation on the performance of the golden globe race 2018 boats is expected to extend thanks to the relatively north position of Jean-Luc that preserves it from the bad weather.

    In third position, uku randmaa has just dive south to enjoy the tail of a depression that will enable him to accelerate his approach to the Boatshed.com drop point of Hobart where he is expected this Friday, October 26 at 5 UTC. Soon the return to a little greenery and civilization for Estonian! You'll have to wait a little longer to see Susie Goodall's beautiful smile, probably around the 1ST OR 2th of November. On the upper edge of the depression that will catch up with uku it leads to nearly 6 knots in a north-West flow that will switch south before a high pressure zone slows down a bit of its arrival. The English may not want to complain about it, considering the storm she recently escaped...

    A slowdown is also planned for his two pursuers who should lose some of the ground that this nasty wind had allowed them to win on Susie (she had to go back to avoid the worst of bad weather). Istvan the and tapio lehtinen should temporarily slow down tomorrow before finding a moderate western flow and a new band of high pressure. This slow progression could be further upset by the presence of the prohibited navigation zone in the 42th parallel, which will prevent them from diving south before 250 miles for istvan and 330 for tapio. To follow...

    Far away from Australian Longitudes, Mark Sinclair and Igor Zaretskiy continue their slow progress towards the east, between 3 AND 4 knots. Fortunately, the moderate South-West flow in which they are currently evolving will switch to the West-Northwest by strengthening tomorrow, allowing them to slide faster on the direct road, in a wave that will strengthen. At least they will soon have spent the first half of the Indian Ocean, often described as the most difficult for the sailors!

    Christophe


    *********************





    DAY 114 – Loïc Lepage rescue successful
    Dateline 16:30 UTC 22.10.2018 – Hobart, Tasmania

    French solo yachtsman Loïc Lepage was successfully transferred from his dismasted yacht Laaland by the Japanese bulk carrier Shiosai at 00:53 UTC Monday.

    The rescue, which took place in the South Indian Ocean some 670 miles SW of Perth Western Australia, commenced shortly after first light once the Australian P-8A search and rescue plane was overhead. Members of the Shiosai crew were lowered down in the ship’s recovery vessel, and though the rolling swell presented a few challenges, Lepage was plucked from his yacht and successfully transferred to the ship.

    Francis Tolan, skipper of the S/V Alizes II, a Beneteau Ocean 43 competing in the Long Route solo circumnavigation who also came to the aid of Lepage, was released from search and rescue tasking and sincerely thanked by both the Golden Globe Race Organisers and the Australian Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Canberra, which oversaw the operation.

    In a message to Alizes II , JRCC said: “Your efforts and endeavours to provide a fellow mariner with requested assistance in challenging conditions are in keeping with the greatest traditions of a mariner at sea. Well done and thank you.”

    Don McIntyre, Chairman of the GGR, added: “Everyone at the Golden Globe Race have complete admiration and the utmost respect for all involved with the successful rescue of Loïc. The professionalism, expertise and passion displayed at all levels is truly amazing. You are all a great asset to Australia and mariners everywhere.”

    The 176,827 Ton Japanese bulk carrier Shiosai has now resumed her course with Loïc Lepage aboard, bound for Las Palmas, Argentina and is scheduled to dock there on 22nd November.

    The tracking signal for Lepage‘s yacht Laaland ceased at 06:30 UTC today and is assumed to have been scuttled.

    Lepage was sailing the Chichester Class within the GGR, having stopped in Cape Town to make repairs and replenish supplies. 8 of the original 18 starters remain in the GGR solo non-stop challenge.
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    Goodall Checks Into Hobart



    SUSIE GOODALL arrived tonight at the Boatshed.com Drop Point in Hobart in 4th position, with a big smile on her face !





    On a ROLL!! Family is everything
    My life these past four years is all GGR. The last 117 days I live and breathe it 24hrs. I know every sailor, every wind, every wave. I can feel entrant emotion and sometimes pain. Occasionally I anticipate their thoughts and actions. We are a little family of intrepid voyagers and adventures from all corners of the world recreating 50 years of history in the spirit of Sir Robin Knox Johnston and SUHAILI.

    There are no real surprises in this game as anything goes in extreme adventure. But sometimes I too ask WHY? I am not sailing but I live it. In my subconscious I am there beside them and wake in the depth of night to wonder about one or a more. Are they ok, cold, wet, even safe? Any attempt at sleep thereafter can be challenging, so I get up and check the tracker just like many of you. I look closely for signs.

    Sometimes they ring. Again, I wake immediately stumbling for the phone then the light, balancing pen and paper at the ready. Their initial relaxed HELLO means nothing to me as they hope to sound in control no matter what. It’s the following words that have me holding my breath. You what? Can you repeat that..You’re OK? Great! Do you need anything? Fantastic! I breathe again. Thanks for calling! I try to sleep, but rarely do as night turns to day my fingers still dancing across the keyboard. It’s what I want to do, so it’s OK. I am living it with my sailing family.

    When that call comes describing a rollover and lost mast it is tough on us both. When it’s all over we question WHY? I personally know more sailors who have been knocked down or rolled over in the Southern Ocean that have kept their mast, than lost them. That includes me. So WHY are four GGR rigs on the seafloor? I am still thinking about it and so are many sailors. I have no simple answer for now other than suggesting it’s tough in the Southern Ocean. Maybe even tougher than it was 50 years ago. Climate is changing the world over.

    All boats and rig’s went through thorough rebuilds and checks prior to the start. No one could look at GGR rigs and question their integrity. No one did. They all looked good. They were a great display of industry best practice based on around the world standards and I was happy with them. Over the next nine months we will investigate many things, talk to mast makers, riggers and the sailors themselves to see if lessons are to be learned. If there are and I hope so, we will make recommendations to entrants for the 2022 GGR. They won’t be new rules ( we already have plenty) because the GGR is for sensible sailors who are watching and learning from this extreme test and no one would intentionally go far South with a rig they believed was anything other than ready!

    At any level the GGR is a HUGE challenge both emotionally and physically. I have said many times in the past that…The world has never seen anything like this for 50 years. Maybe the activities and dramas of the past months just confirms that the challenge today really is as tough as it was back then.









    And then there is Susie! She has given me the toughest moments of the Race so far. What a sailor she is. Youngest person in the fleet with the courage and determination of a.????? How can you even compare her. From the very beginning she has done everything right. She is still there fighting. She has had serious challenges that have nothing to do with the weather or the boat. Social media can make it look all too easy, or all too hard, but it can never really get inside the depth of emotion it can take to keep going day after day. She has had some bad luck like all entrants. She has made good and bad decisions too. But Susie has pressures maybe more than most because she is the lone woman in the GGR with an amazing story and a great smile. On the Ocean we are all equal, but when I saw another version of ABHILASH’S and GREGOR’s storm about to form right on her projected position I thought ..OH NO! Not Susie…

    I checked, then checked again all possible forecasting options to take her away or through it. It was hopeless. I had to send her BACK!. How could I even suggest that!. I checked with Jesse another solo circumnavigator. He agreed she had to run, run fast and run now. I sent the message…SUSIE GO BACK! Susie rang to confirm and decided to go for it, not believing her own decision. I am not sure when I decided I would rather be out there sailing through the storm than sitting awaiting the outcome, but I did. It was tough for me. Was it the right advice or not?. Would she roll and lose the mast or worse? Time moved very slowly. It was my personal nightmare reminding me of the strength and trust of FAMILY. I am not a Race Director, I am simply family. We are close in our own way, we really are. She did it and it is her story and what a story it is. A GGR sponsor would make Jane and I VERY happy but not half as happy as when Susie rang to say it was nearly over!!! That was a dandy!!

    Living the GGR through the Yellowbrick tracker is unique but throw in the daily tweets and soundcloud calls and you have a complete picture. It is rich food for your imagination. Many tell us it is more LIVE and connected than they ever would have dreamed. LOIC LEPAGE is gone and now there are only eight. You can feel the difference, you can see the difference. Who will make it to the end? This adventure has matured and like many I respect these eight more than ever before. It is a long road and we are not fully half way. J-L VDH is flying while IGOR ZARETSKIY is fighting his own battle half a world away. This is a race, an adventure, a struggle to survive and a celebration of something we rarely see these days. True human endeavor and raw courage.

    I wonder what tomorrow brings?

    Don








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    Uku Randmaa Takes Ist Storm Of November On The Chin


    https://goldengloberace.com/livetracker/


    UPDATE; Message from Tapio Lehtinen Sailing STORM JIB, STAYSAIL, 2.REEF, READY 2 SHORTEN, HEADING NE,F4F Position: 43' 27.203 S 137' 18.379 E at 01 Nov 12:29 UTC ..winds are starting to increase slowly in his position now. .....all our thoughts for now are with Tapio..GOOD LUCK!!

    Istvan Kopar Solo Circumnavigator just called to advise he is sailing in 45kts now and has seen Matsyker island light. He is considering to make for RECHERCHE BAY just behind SOUTH EAST CAPE of Tasmania to seek PORT OF REFUGE then anchor and sit out the storm. He could be there in the next 8-10 hours or around midday local time. He has good anchoring gear onboard.

    It is raining in Hobart right now so hopefully Susie Goodall Racing is catching some. The forecast storm for Uku Randmaa Golden Globe Race 2018 is changing a little so he may get some strong winds on the Southern tip of it in a few days as it heads across the Tasman. Jean Luc Vandenheede looks like he may race so fast to the east that he will get past a strong southerly storm approaching his position that may then pass behind him!!

    Mark Slats is enjoying the sailing and Mark Sinclair has found Gregor McGuckin yacht and taken photos. He reports the AIS beacon is still operational and it is floating high in the water.

    Игорь Зарецкий IGOR is still intending to head to St Paul Island..

    *********************

    While Susie Goodall made a reasonable choice to shelter near a very protected beach that bears the providential name of safety bay, near the very tourist port Arthur, the terrible storm she chose to escape Continue his progress towards Tasmania. If istvan the should escape, it is unfortunately not the same for tapio lehtinen who is preparing to take this nasty blow of wind of full whip...

    Not many options for the Finnish who, if he climbs too north, takes the risk of being pushed to the West Coast Tasmanian. In about ten hours, he will start to feel the first influences of this violent system before the winds scream beyond the 70 knots for at least 24 hours and their north-West orientation will quickly pass South - West, which presupposes the rapid swelling of the wave that could exceed 10 meters... a situation that will necessarily be very uncomfortable for tapio who sails on a Gaia 36, boat very low on water...

    This is also brutal for uku randmaa, who is currently progressing as fast as he can south is in the sea of of to escape the strongest of this storm that will catch him too, a little later. It will have to deal with very solid weather conditions if forecasts remain and should be impacted by the strongest of the storm on 3 November. Here too the announced winds are very strong and the sea will swell quickly... remaining very fat even after the strongest of bad weather. A situation unfortunately conducive to knock down, when the swell is no longer compressed by wind force...

    In Front, Jean-LUC VAN DEN HEEDE IS ALREADY ONLY 2500 miles away from Cape Horn, which he thinks he will wrap in about 2500 days. But he will also have to compose with a big blow that should hit him in 3 days with a powerful southern stream that, besides the cold he will bring with him, will lift a strong swell... Always 2000 Miles behind, Mark Slats should not be worried about the little depression that is forming in his back table.

    As for Igor Zaretskiy, 5800 miles from the leader, he also did not escape the curse of the barnacles who complain several skippers (Uku, Susie, tapio...) that may be what explains - to Less in part - its low progression for weeks. Still, he decided to shelter himself under the small island of Saint Paul, in his southeast, to clean his hull. Meanwhile, Mark Sinclair chose to try to find gregor mcguckin's boat to make some pictures...

    Christophe back from Tasmania on the train to the sands of olonne.
    No carto today because it doesn't pass at 300 mph. I recommend the tracker of the website www.goldengloberace.com
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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    Tough Times For Tail End Tapio




    FRENCH UPDATE 02/11/2018 #GGR2018:

    Big time on the golden globe race 2018... while a violent wind alert has just been launched on Southern Tasmania, Tapio Lehtinen has been caught in the biggest storm he had to suffer since the beginning of the race... and by far. Winds of 55 knots with gusts of up to 70 in a wave that reaches 12 metres at a time... this is the terrifying environment in which Finnish is evolving right now.




    https://goldengloberace.com/livetracker/

    He curved yesterday his road to the northeast to try to escape the strongest of the system, but that was not enough. If he has been impotent to the dizzying fall of the barometer, he knows that in about hours the wind will quickly decrease... but the sea will take much longer to calm down. Under Storm Rigging, Tapio expects to see the situation deteriorate further and is impressed by the landscape surrounding it... we would be less.

    Istvan the was more fortunate because he was able to shelter in time to search Bay, not without difficulty after having to fight in winds of 45 knots before he managed to anchor. It is only 35 miles away from Boatshed.com drop point but will probably wait until Sunday morning to join Kingston Beach, in view of weather forecasts...

    This very bad weather has at least the advantage of draining with him a pouring rain that allows Susie, sheltered also a little further, at safety bay, to redo her water reserves that were low. She should wait until Sunday morning also to go to the assault of the sea of tasmania. Uku randmaa is going to finish crossing her and dive South-East to try to escape this violent storm coming on him and who should hit him in a little over hours...

    In Front, navigation is much more comfortable for Mark Slats, who does not forget his little game mates, who he cares about in his last message. It sails at good speed in the middle of a high pressure zone that will soon be filled with a strong north wind that will propel it full is at good speed while Jean-Luc van den heede will also be caught up by a depression Who will generate strong west winds that will strengthen by passing south and lifting a big sea...

    It is therefore the largest part of the fleet of the golden globe race 2018 that battle or will fight in a very violent weather this weekend, except in the back of the fleet where Mark Sinclair and Igor Zarestkiy always evolve in Very negotiable conditions. Russian always goes south - is to find a shelter and try to free himself from the barnacles that invaded his hull while captain coconut announced that he found gregor mcguckin's boat and made pictures.

    Christophe
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  6. #76
    Tapio needs to clean his bottom

  7. #77
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    Race Leader Knocked Down


    https://goldengloberace.com/livetracker/

    ·
    Jean Luc Vandenheede Knocked down to 150 degrees, damaged the rigging and running under bare poles in strong winds and big seas. . More news to follow...


    STOP PRESS: Race leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede suffers knock-down and mast damage
    At 1500hrs UTC 5th NOV. Jean-Luc Van Den Heede called GGR Founder Don McIntyre to advise that his Rustler 36 Matmut had been knocked down badly to about 150° which had damaged the connecting bolt attachment to the mast that holds all four lower shrouds. The mast was not in danger of falling, but it was not securely tensioned. The bolt has slipped 5cm down in the mast section and slackened the rigging.. He is still in the storm with 11 metre seas and 65knot winds. Conditions are expected to moderate in the next few hours.

    The 73-year old race Frenchman from Les Sables d’Olonne is now running downwind with no sails until conditions improve. He will then effect a repair that will allow him to hoist sail again and make for Valparaiso, Chile where he will make a permanent repair.

    Jean Luc was not injured during the knock-down, has requested NO ASSISTANCE at this time and is confident he can make Valparaiso safely. This will mean that he will move to the Chichester Class once he makes that port to effect repairs.

    This is NOT a CODE ORANGE situation for GGR and Jean-Luc is well in control of the situation. GGR will monitor his progress to port.



    Kopar blamed a lack of preparation for his poor start to the race. “I dropped to last place before I could work out how to fix my self-steering, and had never put my spinnaker up before the start – that first time was scary!”

    “My main goal is to save the rig, save the boat and to arrive back at the finish. Right now, I feel closer to Joshua Slocum’s achievement (first to sail solo around the world in 1895-1898) than Robin Knox-Johnston’s (first to complete a solo non-stop circumnavigation and win the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in 1968/69). I can’t even get a time signal – It’s not good. Everything is guesswork.”

    Kopar’s ‘bad luck’ started with getting to grips with an unfamiliar wind vane self steering system at the start and extends to a rogue wave that washed out much his electronics and books, and flooded the main cabin with 300 litres of water. The last straw was a bird that attempted to land on his masthead wind vane, bending one of the arms into his VHF radio antennae and interrupt the signal.

    He didn’t check his fresh water tank before the start and says now. “In Ghana they have cleaner water than I do.” He also added that the inside of his mould-ridden boat “is not healthy – not good at all.”

    Could these situations be affecting his hands? “My nails are separating from the flesh. Cuts don’t bother me, but I’m scared about the state of my nails. They are black. I don’t know if it is caused by a fungal infection, the drinking water or the fungus inside the boat.”

    He bemoans chasing cross the Atlantic to get to the start on time, rather than focusing on getting to know his boat. But still smiling, he added more positively. “Now I am on catch-up and would like to catch up with Susie Goodall in 4th place – I gave my word to her mother before the start that I would look after her!” He joked.

    There is certainly a race now, not for 4th, but to capture a podium position at the finish back in Les Sables d’Olonne. Kopar, Goodall and even 6th placed Tapio Lehtinen, due to reach Hobart tomorrow (Tuesday) all have eyes on Estonian Uku Randmaa and his struggle to maintain pace with his barnacle encrusted yacht One and All.

    4,000 miles ahead of this group, Race leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede is currently facing what my become one of his biggest tests so far. In a 2-minute conversation with Race HQ in Les Sables d’Olonne today he spoke about 65knot winds and 11 metre seas. But at least he is now within 1,900 miles of Cape Horn, which the Frenchman expects to round on November 21st.

    Contrast this with the performance of last placed runners Australian Mark Sinclair and Russian Igor Zaretskiy, now a whole ocean apart from Jean-Luc’s Rustler 36 Matmut. Zaretskiy, who has had his problems fixing a broken forestay and suffering hand sores, has chalked up an average VMG of just 2.1knots over the past two months.

    Sinclair is clearly getting much more enjoyment from his solitude, but still, his average VMG over the same period is only 2.3knots. Last week he took time out to track down and photograph Gregor McGuckin’s abandoned yacht Hanley Energy Endurance. “Still afloat and emitting an AIS signal” he reported to Race HQ. Sinclair expects to reach the Boatshed.com Hobart film gate on Saturday December 8. By then both Van Den Heede and second placed Dutchman Mark Slats (Ohpen Maverick) are likely to have rounded Cape Horn and heading north up the Atlantic.









    Boat
    RACE NO 8

    Name Matmut
    Type Rustler 36 Masthead sloop
    Designer Holman & Pye
    Builder Rustler Yachts (UK)
    LOA 35.33ft / 10.77m
    LWL 26.92ft / 8.21m
    Beam 11.00ft / 3.35m
    Draft 5.50ft / 1.67m
    Displacement 16805 lbs / 7623 kgs
    Sail area 693sq. ft / 64.38sq. m

    Jean-Luc van den Heede completed a 6-month refit of his Rustler 36 class yacht Matmut in 2016, replacing her mast, rigging, sails, ropes and engine. He also completed the compulsory test sail under jury rig and spent the 2017/18 winter months sailing her in the Bay of Biscay and Atlantic to test the yacht in strong winds with assistance from former GGR entrant Lionel Regnier.





    Profile
    Name Jean-Luc van den Heede

    Born June 8th 1945

    Nationality French

    Country of entry France

    Jean-Luc van den Heede is the father figure of French solo sailing. The 5-time circumnavigator already holds the record for the fastest solo west-about non-stop circumnavigation against the prevailing winds and currents, and has been a podium finisher in four previous solo round the world races. He finished 2nd in the 1986 BOC Challenge Around Alone Race, 3rd in the 1990 Vendée Globe Race, 2nd in the 1993 Vendée Globe, and 3rd in the 1995 BOC Challenge Around Alone Race. Van den Heede bought a Rustler 36 class yacht in august 2015 and spent the first few months test sailing her out in the Atlantic before commencing a complete refit in his homeport of La Sables d’Olonne.

    He has won sponsorship from the French insurance group MATMUT.

    Jean-Luc says of the GGR: “From all my experiences, I am well aware of the difficulties this race poses. The slow speeds of these classic old boats with their long keels, the absence of weather information, the loss of all electronics and reliance on a sextant to plot positions, the lack of terrestrial contact, and the replacement of an electric pilot with wind vane self steering, will make this test even more random and difficult than the Vendée Globe.
    But this is good. I want to re-live the conditions and challenges that my sailing predecessors enjoyed and to this end I have optimised my Rustler 36: New mast, new rigging, new engine, new sails, watertight bulkheads, and new winches. I am very conscious of the problems that are likely to occur during our 8 or 9 months of sea and have done everything to make Matmut safer. I am also trying to get myself in the best physical condition with the assistance of a physio, a coach – and my bicycle!
    I have also rediscovered the environment and comradeship I loved so much during the first editions of these races. We are all conscious that this will be a difficult adventure and that engenders a strong bond between us that I have not seen since the first Mini Transat 6.50 and Vendée Globe race back in the early ‘90s.
    My goal is to be in good health at the start with a top boat, then, take each day in turn, absorbing the emotions and thoughts of those who preceded us: Slocum, Moitessier, Alain Gerbault, Vito Dumas and of course, my good friend Sir Robin Knox-Johnston who set such an example for us all 50 years ago.”
    Last edited by Photoboy; 11-05-2018 at 11:50 AM.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  8. #78
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    November 7th Update"Sea State Is Chaotic"



    TRACKER


    FRENCH UPDATE 07/11/2018 : #GGR2018

    " the sea is totally chaotic. I remain on the run without a veil at 5 KT "... this is the terse message sent this night by Jean-Luc Van Den Heede, always on the edge of the wicked storm that violently stopped the trajectory so far exemplary of the leader Race. And this stationary system obliges him to go north, under the pain of suffering even more difficult conditions than those with which he must already compose... Fortunately, gradually, this big depression will move east and leave a sea ( A bit) more manageable.

    The hit is hard for the Dean of the race that had so far demonstrated an incredible ease accompanied by an endless preparation. But man faces, with all the experience and determination that has made him a great sailor for decades. And his advance is such that he is still almost 2000 miles ahead of Mark Slats, his closest competitor. The Dutch Giant, who had crossed a very frustrating indian ocean confessed to yesterday's vacation, took great pleasure in sailing in the Pacific, where he finally found the healthy winds that had so cruelly missed him at Hobart's approach. And the week is fast and comfortable for the skipper who also wants to lift a little foot to preserve his mount.

    The entry into the pacific is also relatively easy for uku randmaa 1000 miles away, even if two depressions, one in the north and the other south of its trajectory should lift a messy sea from tomorrow. At the same time, the formation of a high pressure bubble should slow it down, but it will happily be replaced by moderate winds.

    The Tasman Sea Crossing is serene for Susie Goodall and istvan the, respectively 700 and 900 miles from Estonian. The passage of a violent depression in their south in 4 days should, however, lift a big wave that could make the Southern New Zealand approach uncomfortable for the English, especially as the wind may be relatively low at this time There...

    As for tapio lehtinen, he finally joined the Boatshed.com drop point, without having the ability to use his engine. The Finnish appeared smiling and in shape and should leave 24 hours after this mandatory stop in Kingston Beach. It should then benefit from mild conditions for several days to attack the tasman sea.

    Mild conditions, that's what's also waiting for Mark Sinclair, now less than 1000 miles from the Australian Coast, and Igor Zarestkiy. If the Russian, 550 miles to the west should see once again engulfed a few hours in a bubble without wind tomorrow, both should benefit from moderate winds but still healthy to move east easily, in the wake of Suhaili.

    Christophe
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  9. #79
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Jean-Luc Van Den Heede To Carry On




    Here is the retranscription of the message of Jean-Luc Van Den Heede recovered thanks to the radio-amateurs network and the Terre & Mer collective : #GGR2018

    "I had plenty of time to think about my situation during these four days of escaping the storm (220 miles lost to the North)." My mast is now extremely precarious due to my capsize. If I stop to make a repair, it will be only temporary. For Matmut to continue sailing, it will need more or less long to change to a new mast.

    So I decided, to save my soul (dixit Moitessier), to continue my route non-stop and head for Les Sables d'Olonne.




    As soon as the sea will allow it I will climb in the mast to secure it as best as possible with what I can use onboard. If I get dismasted, I have like all competitors a jury rig that will allow me to reach a port in full autonomy. I am no longer in racing mode but in safe mode. This is not the first time I will attempt to bring home a damaged boat. And if by miracle I get to Les Sables d'Olonne, I do not care about the ranking, at least I will have tried. I cross my fingers and thank all those who help me in this adventure.

    The message has been transmitted thanks to the network of radio amateurs and the Collectif Terre et Mer, which is our only way of communicating with the earth and providing all the competitors with weather situations. I thank them warmly".

    Signed: JLVDH.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  10. #80
    Badass!
    Pointing like a traffic cop, footin like a track star.

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