Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: 2018 BBS Official Thread

  1. #1
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,473
    Blog Entries
    1

    2018 BBS Official Thread



    A little warm up video from the J-125 Timshaver to set the mood....
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  2. #2
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,473
    Blog Entries
    1

    Big Breeze & Big Fun Predicted For 4th PAC 52 Stop




    The predictive wind forecasts show bundles of sun and fun for the fleet in the 2018 St Francis YC Big Boat Series sponsored by Rolex. With winds expected in the 15 -25 knot range, temps in the mid 60's to low 70's, the PAC 52 fleet will be battling on the edge and eating up the racecourse in spectacular fashion. The prior 3 Southern California stop in San Diego, Long Beach and Marina Del Rey have provided a great training surface for crews which must now adjust to closer quarters, stronger breeze and unforgiving currents.











    Local boat Frank Slootman's Invisible Hand enters into the 7 race series with a 6 point lead over Austin and Gwen Fragomen's Interlodge for the season championship. Just off the pace, Manouch Moshayedi' RIO and last years season champions, Tom Holthus's BadPak, both eager to reverse earlier fortunes at the start of the season.
    But in this ultra competitive class, nothing is secure until the boats cross the finish, leads are exchanged quite frequently and W's can be counted until the whistle blows. Add to the mix the unpredictable nature of inter fleet interaction, such as the 28 boat strong J-105 class, or the various courses and speeds of the ORR divisions and you have a real high seas 3D chess match brewing in every leg, and nothing can be taken for granted!













    The tactician's and navigators will have their hands full, and teams are loaded with talent in that department. BadPak utilizing local wiz Christopher Lewis along with Artie Means and Bruce Nelson are playing for keeps. RIO counters with local talent Mike Menninger and Justin Schaffer while Interlodge brings in Surfdaddy Morgan Larson and Geoff Ewenson to help predict things before they happen. The Beau Geste tandem of Gavin Brady and Jamie Gale have proven hard to trip up as crew for Invisible Hand and would love nothing more than to prove last years Big Boat Series win on BG was not just a fluke.







    The bottom line with these grand prix boats and their well trained crews is you will have nearly as much fun observing the flawless boat handling, tight roundings, lightning quick sets and takedowns from a nearby vessel, on shore vantage point or perhaps a large steel structure spanning the Golden Gate. HINT: There are more courses going in and out the gate than ever this year and when was the last time you rode your bike on the west side or took a nice stroll on the east side?
    Racing commences at 11:00 on Thursday with 2 per day with the grand finale, the Bay Tour scheduled for 11:00 Sunday.

    http://www.pac52class.com/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  3. #3
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,473
    Blog Entries
    1



    SAN FRANCISCO, CA — In sailing, as in life, most important contests are won and lost in the days and weeks preceding the starting guns, and the St. Francis Yacht Club’s 54th annual Rolex Big Boat Series (September 12-16, 2018) is no exception. All 76 teams that have assembled ahead of the West Coast’s toughest regatta understand that winning on San Francisco Bay requires absolute top form given the impressive levels of competition, sailing talent, and tightly choreographed teamwork that will be on display once racing commences. For many of the competing teams, this internationally recognized and respected Grand Prix event is the pinnacle of their sailing season and serves as a high-octane finale that’s typically punctuated by ample breeze, challenging tides and currents, world-class racecourse management, and engaging, family-friendly evening entertainment.

    While every Rolex Big Boat Series features highly polished teams, fresh-from-the-loft sails, and some of the West Coast’s hottest sailing hardware, this year’s event is shaping up to offer especially intense one-design and handicap (ORR) racing, with many past winners returning to defend their titles or win back what was once their own.











    If some of the 2017 Rolex Big Boat Series’ most compelling storylines involved the brand-new Pac52 class, one of this year’s hottest stories comes from the J/105 class, whose 2018 scratch sheet includes 28 of these can-do keelboats, making this the regatta’s largest one-design class. Impressively, the class’s scratch sheet also includes former perpetual trophy winners, such as Chris and Phil Perkins’ Good Timin’ (USA 35), Ryan Simmons’ Blackhawk (USA 40), Phillip Laby’s Godot (USA 44), and Bruce Stone and Nicole Breault’s Arbitrage (USA 116) teams. While Perkins won top J/105 honors at last year’s regatta, both Arbitrage and Blackhawk enjoyed top-three finishes at this year’s Aldo Alessio and Phyllis Kleinman Swiftsure Regatta (August 17-19, 2018), which serves as a warm-up event for the Rolex Big Boat Series. This year’s J/105 win is a particularly tough ask.








    Three of the ultra-competitive Pac52s—Tom Holthus’ BadPak (USA 60052), Manouch Moshayedi’s Rio (USA 3545), and Frank Slootman’s Invisible Hand (USA 5202)—from last year’s debut fleet are returning to their familiar battlegrounds and are being joined by Austin and Gwen Fragomen’s Interlodge (USA 5210). Interestingly, Karl Kwok and his Team Beau Geste (IVB 1997) planted a perfect picket fence on their 2017 scorecard but are not returning to defend their title, thus putting this Grand Prix class up for grabs among a group of skippers not happy with second best.

    While J/88 sailors have previously enjoyed handicap racing at the Rolex Big Boat Series, this year marks their first time competing as a one-design class. On the other end of the regatta’s historical spectrum is the time-honored Express 37 class, which represents one of the regatta’s true beating hearts. Sandy Andersen Wertanen and her Eclipse (USA 18495) team are returning to defend their 2017 win, however they can expect plenty of racecourse pressure from Jack Peurach’s Elan (USA 87700) and Mark Chaffey and Heidi Hall’s Loca Motion (USA 18410) teams, which finished in second and third, respectively, at last year’s Rolex Big Boat Series.

    In addition to one-design racing, the StFYC’s 2018 Rolex Big Boat Series will offer the West Coast’s highest-level ORR handicap racing, with 28 boats spread across three highly competitive classes. Here, ORR-A will be populated with boats ranging in size from 48’ to 53’ LOA, while ORR-B and ORR-C will feature a mix of 30- and 40-footers; all three classes are well-populated with previous class winners or bridesmaids.








    The enduring partnership between Rolex and the Big Boat Series will again be reflected in the five gleaming Rolex Submariner Date timepieces that will be awarded to the winners of the five perpetual trophies during Sunday’s Trophy Ceremony, which will take place on the StFYC’s east last at approximately 1600 hours. This year, the ORR-A class will be competing for the St. Francis Perpetual Trophy, ORR-B will be racing for the City of San Francisco Perpetual Trophy, and ORR-C will battling for the Keefe-Kilborne Trophy, while the J/88 class will be sailing for the Richard Rheem Perpetual Trophy, and the J/105 class will be contesting the Commodore’s Cup, the latter of which is especially appropriate given that StFYC’s first woman Commodore, Theresa Brandner, will be skippering her Walloping Swede (USA 157) and flying StFYC colors in this 28-strong class.

    While all sailors would love to earn top honors and—class-depending—help their skipper take home a beautiful new Rolex, they first need to prove their racecourse acumen in the seven races set to unfurl over the course of the regatta. Here, StFYC’s Race Director Jenn Lancaster has 78 possible courses to select from, depending on forecasted and observed conditions, for the six different racecourses that will be run simultaneously.








    “We can’t guarantee the weather, but we can guarantee world-class racecourse management,” says Lancaster, who will be working with the well-respected father-and-son team of Peter and Anderson Reggio, returning as the regatta’s Principal Race Officers. “We have a lot of experienced racers coming back this year, and I’m expecting all teams to be prepared and ready for four big days of intense sailing.”

    The Race Committee is set to fire their first guns for the 54th annual Rolex Big Boat Series tomorrow, Thursday, September 13, at 1100 hours, and—if the weather gods cooperate, will conduct two races per day for the first three days, followed by a longer Bay Tour on Sunday, September 16.

    https://rolexbigboatseries.com/
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  4. #4
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,473
    Blog Entries
    1
    SAN FRANCISCO, CA — It’s not often that Mother Nature’s agenda perfectly aligns with a regatta’s racing schedule, but that’s exactly what unfurled for the first day of racing in the St. Francis Yacht Club’s 54th annual Rolex Big Boat Series (September 12-16, 2018). The 76 participating teams hoisted sail in 12-15 knot breezes and flat seas for their first race of the West Coast’s most prestigious regatta. Warm sunshine and a flooding tide ensured that the good times only compounded as the day unfurled and the breeze slowly but consistently built, eventually just knocking the tops off the waves to punctuate San Francisco Bay with sporadic white caps.

    And while the racers more or less stayed dry (by San Francisco Bay standards, of course), the smiles were visible from multiple boat lengths away as teams put their steeds through the paces, their sails staying powered-up throughout both of the day’s races.

    “I’m really excited about all three ORR classes,” says regatta co-chair Susan Ruhne, about the week’s racing. “It’s the most robust and competitive handicap fleet that we’ve had in years. I’m also excited about the first race of each day, as some fleets will have their finishes off of the Race Deck. This is new and it will bring racing to the clubhouse windows.”

    Sailors competing in Class ORR-B began their day on the Treasure Island racecourse, and while the flood tide effectively lengthened each beat, the fastest teams did a great job finding maximum current relief along the Cityfront.

    “This is my third or fourth Rolex Big Boat Series, but it’s my first time doing it as just the Big Boat Series and not as a pre-Worlds,” says Charlie Enright, who is serving as tactician aboard Julian Mann’s C&C 30, Don’t Panic (USA 30026), and who served as skipper of Vestas 11th Hour Racing in the 2017/2018 edition of the Volvo Ocean Race. “We left the dock yesterday afternoon at 4:30 PM and we came back in at 6:15 PM,” jokes Enright about the team’s pre-Rolex Big Boat Series preparations. “We sailed the boat for two weeks in the Caribbean this spring, and the owner Julian Mann, is an old friend and even came and sailed Leg Zero of the Volvo Ocean Race with us aboard Vestas 11th Hour Racing from Plymouth, England to Saint Malo, France.”

    When pressed for the team’s favorite conditions, Enright points squarely at today’s conditions: “We like 18 knots and flat seas,” he says, adding that, “our strategy is to get better as the week goes on, [make] no big mistakes and keep it close, like in golf.”

    These flat, fast waters offered opportunities for huge leaderboard changes, especially in the Pac52s with the straggler in the first race, Invisible Hand(USA 5202), reversing fortunes to win the second. Gary Panariello’s Courageous (USA 77) and Marc McMorris in M Squared(USA 75) mixed up first and seconds in the J/88 fleet. Two boats dominated their classes: David Halliwill’s J/120 Peregrine(USA 25487) in ORR C and Kame Richards’ Express 37 Golden Moon(USA 18488).

    The Express 37 class has served as one of the Rolex Big Boat Series’ true beating hearts for several decades and sailed their second race of the day on the Alcatraz Race Course, out under the Golden Gate Bridge, passing several humpback whales en route and hugging the Bay’s north shores for current relief as they charged into a growing breeze that at times registered as high as 18 knots.

    “We pay no attention to the weather,” says Richards, a former (and repeat) Rolex Big Boat Series perpetual trophy winner. “You can spend a lot of energy on stuff that you don’t have any control over. We leave the dock saying that these conditions are the best [conditions]—we’re not looking for any specific conditions, we just want to go sailing.”

    Instead, explains Richards, the team focuses on the variables that they can directly influence. “Our strategy is good communication—we want to make sure that everyone knows what the next play is, and we want to sail with our heads out of the boat and be ready,” he says. “We’re a group of friends who like sailing together. We prepare [for the Rolex Big Boat Series] with beer can racing at Oakland Yacht Club, and we don’t stress too much about preparing. We have a few new sails, but not lots of practice.”

    While this strategy might not work for all teams, Richards’ two wins today speak volumes for the kinds of onboard communication that he and his friends have developed and fostered over their years of racing—and winning Rolex watches and beer-can races—together. “Our measure of success is good mark roundings,” says Richards. “It’s not about finishing in first, second or last place; it’s about sailing the boat well. That’s always our goal. There are some very good sailors here and it’s a non-trivial regatta, so we’re going to do the best that we can do.”

    Judging by all empirical evidence, Richards and his Golden Moon team can be proud of more than just their day’s mark roundings, but with five additionally scheduled races over the next three days of sailing, complacency has no spot aboard any boat in any Rolex Big Boat Series class.

    Racing continues tomorrow, Friday, September 14, with the first guns scheduled to sound at 1100 hours, and sailors should again enjoy similarly great late-summer winds and (relatively) flat flood-tide waters tomorrow.


    Full Results
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  5. #5
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,473
    Blog Entries
    1

    Day One Provides Excellent Thrills for PAC52 Fleet At 2018 Rolex Big Boat Series

    Day One Provides Excellent Thrills for PAC52 Fleet At 2018 Rolex Big Boat Series




    Sunshine, big currents, and wide variety of winds provide the PAC 52 a superb variety of challenges in the 1st two races of the StFYC Big Boat Series sponsored by Rolex. A short delay to low tide preventing the deeper draft boat kept the 52’s from starting until noon on the Alcatraz Course for race one. In near billiard table flat conditions thanks to a healthy flood, the fleet march straight up the course toward the 1st mark, Point Diablo just outside the Golden Gate. In 8-12 knots, the boats made quick work of the leg, working their way to the current relief of Lime Point in the shadow of the North Tower. While the land mass provides current relief, the towering bluffs also provide wind turbulence and the line between breeze and no breeze can be very fickle.




    Tom Holthus’s BadPak and Manouch Moshayedi’s RIO started off with impressive speed and led the boats to Lime Point, working very close to shore, with Austin Fragomen’s Interlodge in close pursuit. Coming in from a more center Bay approach, Frank Slootman’s Invisible Hand arrived just in time to receive a surprise starboard tack maneuver courtesy Interlodge which forced them into the no wind zone, helplessly watching Interlodge pull away.

    Rio would lead BadPak around the weather mark at Point Diablo by 18 or 19 seconds and Interlodge by 2 minutes and The Hand by some 5 minutes… So much for close competition, right?



    While Rio led the fleet on the downhill run back to the Alcatraz Gate, BadPak closed the gap significantly and rounded just a couple boat lengths in Rio’s rear-view mirror. Meanwhile Interlodge had halved the deficit at the gate while The Hand utilized their downhill speed in an attempt to climb back in the race. Unfortunately for them, matter turned south when a headsail kerfuffle forced the to sail bald headed for 10 or so minutes while the corrected matters. When it rains, it pours.



    Rio was well on their way to another first place mark rounding as the reached Lime point again and worked their way along the previously mentioned wind /no wind zone. That when BadPak pounced, short tacking RIO with a starboard maneuver that sent RIO into Irons. OUCH… BadPak would round Diablo Point with a 45 second advance, But Rio was NOT giving up. A quick Jibeset and Rio was in better current and stronger wind near the North Tower and looked primed to reel them in. The lead, however was just two great, advantage BadPak, giving them the 1st bullet of the regatta.




    Race 2, now at the Treasure Island Course saw The Hand’s bad luck streak continue, receiving a rare OCS at the start and forcing them to give the fleet another advantage. With winds now perking up to the high teens, the fleet worked their way up the Alcatraz cone, moving toward the City Front and the mass of J-105’s short taking along the shoreline in the building ebb. The breeze had switched to a distinctively SW direction and with the ebb, was now in the 25 plus knot range. Between the moving landmine of boats headed west, another fleet of fast moving asymmetrical boats from ORR B were blasting east, living on the edge indeed, the sound of glass vs carbon impact never did occur, amazing in itself.



    The boats arrived at the 1st weather mark, Blackaller with RIO just ahead of Interlodge and The Hand. They set in puffy 20 plus knots in tight formation and had traveled a few hundred yards before chaos took hold. With a loud bang heard for some distance, RIO’s spinnaker tack blew and while attempting to mitigate the kites wild ride, spun out forcing Interlodge to perform an emergency gybe to avoid collision and moments later The Hand had to throw the helm over to avoid collision.






    Amazingly, The Hand benefited greatly, recovering quickly and taking the lead on the long ride down the edge of the Berkeley shoals with Interlodge nipping at their heels. RIO meanwhile would wrestle with their kite for the next few minutes, Allowing BadPak the chance to catch and pass as they worked their way down the course. Rio would get back in control and on her feet, with her and BadPak closing the gap at the leeward mark, and the fleet became unified again!






    A long windward beat back out the Gate to Point Diablo saw the boat stay on the north side in waning food and much lesser winds. They rounded Lime Point in close proximity and were greeted by another blast of 20 plus knot wind and very choppy water. The hand would round 1st with a 5-6 boat length lead over Interlodge and RIO and BadPak in close pursuit. The ride back under the gate and to the finish in front of the StFYC was one to write home about, a full on fire hosing gallup with boats hitting the low 20’s with spray blasting far and wide, and sailors grins even wider…
    The day ends with all boats tied at 5 points each… all in 1st…
    It doesn’t get any tighter or better than this…

    RESULTS
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  6. #6
    Cant beat September In SF!

  7. #7
    I heard there were some other boats racing too.

  8. #8
    Say it aint so!

    I could get used to the dockside delivery of joyous cups of cold beer.

    Nicely done!

  9. #9
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,473
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by solosailor View Post
    I heard there were some other boats racing too.
    I'm under contract with the PAC 52 class and have my duties...

    Took a few frames of others passing by, even a J 105 start with no OCS! But time is limited at this point.

    Posting the official BBS report as you see above...
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  10. #10

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •