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Thread: A Record Number Of Single Handed Rum Runners

  1. #21
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Banque Populaire Capsizes




    MAXI BANQUE POPULAIRE IX CAPSIZED, ARMEL IS SAFE
    The Maxi Banque Populaire IX capsized around 12:00 (French time) while sailing 340 miles in the northeast of the Azores. The wind conditions were 30/35 knots with 5 meters of sea.


    The boat seems to have capsized following the breakage of its port float. .

    Armel Le Cléac'h was able to trigger his distress beacon and communicate with his technical team ashore. The Gris Nez CROSS took over the organization of the rescue, in coordination with the Race Direction and the Banque Populaire Team. The skipper is safe and secure inside the boat. distress and communicate with his technical team ashore. The Gris Nez CROSS took over the organization of the rescue, in coordination with the Race Direction and the Banque Populaire Team. The is safe and sound inside the boat.


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  2. #22
    I suppose it's better to capsize there than the Southern Ocean.

  3. #23
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    Maxi Ultime Match Race




    With the dramatic capsizing in the early afternoon of the maxi-trimaran Banque Populaire IX, and after the possibly final stops of Thomas Coville (Sodebo) and Sebastien Josse (Edmond de Rothschild), the Route du Rhum - Destination Guadeloupe takes Suddenly look like Atlantic race match between the last two tenors of the Ultim Class. The step of two initiated by Francis Joyon and François Gabart since the passage to Ushant continues today by a duel of eminently tactical tackings, in the north of Madeira, between the two leaders of the race. Obviously, the two solitaries share the same analysis of the very complicated weather situation to come to join the trade winds, and maneuver way in all similar points to find the saving point of passage south of the anticyclone.




    With two tackles each to their credit today, Francis Joyon and François Gabart have begun with a perfect synchronization their descent under the archipelago of the Azores. On a sea always strong, with hollows of more than 4 meters, and in a very unstable wind, much less strong than what knows the fleet in the Bay of Biscay, the two skippers start the most strategic part of this beginning of race, namely the transition to trade winds. Nothing very definitive in the scheduling of weather systems and Francis admits to look for a mouse hole through which to escape to more established winds. The piloting remains for the moment acrobatic, on a maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT well fleeing, and which "very easily raises the paw", amount often on its leeward float.




    Fortunately Francis was finally able to pass Cap Finisterre and take some rest in very short slices of sleep. A little DIY awakening and Francis was again on the attack, under high mainsail and J2, this genoa very versatile.

    "I was told just before the departure the story of Tibetan monks who never slept, and were content with simple moments of drowsiness, holding noisy objects that, falling on the tile of their cell, woke them up immediately . These brief moments of falling asleep are more recuperative than any other form of sleep, and all the better, because from the beginning, I only knew that! "
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  4. #24
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    IMOCA Impacted By Carnage

    After Isabelle Joschke's boat was dismasted during the night, Romain Attanasio announced this lunchtime that he was turning back, as his sails have suffered a lot of damage. Still led by British stalwart, Alex Thomson, fourteen IMOCAs are continuing on their way to Pointe-à-Pitre in chaotic and testing conditions. Today, it is Thomas Ruyant's turn to give us his personal analysis of what is happening in the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe in the IMOCA class.



    "As sailors, we never like to get hit hard from the outset of a race with such tough conditions. Unfortunately, this leads to a sort of natural selection. We know that in this type of transatlantic race, a lot is decided in the first three days of racing, as that is when the major strategic options are taken. The first hurdle was dealing with a trough extending from an area of low pressure 24 hours after the start. Those who kept going straight ahead made it through, like Vincent (Riou), Paul Meilhat and Alan Roura. Those who changed tack lost some ground, like Yann Eliès, Boris Herrmann and Sam Davies. With his option outside of the Ushant Traffic Separation Scheme, Alex Thomson was already way out west and suffered less in this complex weather system.

    "Alex Thomson going wherever the will takes him and is going all out with his options"

    Alex Thomson's position now seems to be very interesting. He sought out the wind shift. That doesn't surprise me. Alex sails like that wherever the will takes him and goes all out with his options. I find it very interesting to watch such strategies as they appeal to me. In a transatlantic race, you can benefit a lot by making gains westward early in the race. They are easy miles after that. One degree of longitude at the latitude of Ushant is equivalent to 40 miles. The same degree of longitude at the latitude of the Cape Verde Islands represents fifty miles...





    The key for Alex in the next 24 hours will involve stepping up the pace in cross seas behind the front. If he manages that, I can imagine that in two days from now he will be around forty miles ahead lined up in front of his the two chasing boats skippered by Vincent Riou and Paul Meilhat, who both went for a more southerly option. The three leaders should in fact start to come together on Wednesday evening or Thursday morning. We'll then see which of them between Alex on the one hand and Vincent and Paul had the best strategy.








    "With each wave, we feel for the boat"

    Conditions are currently tricky for the IMOCAs. The wind can be dealt with fairly well, but the manoeuvres to reduce the sail are complicated, even if experienced sailors know how to deal with that. It is really the sea state that is the hardest thing to cope with. Behind the front, the seas are boiling. The seas are boat-breaking and all over the place. With Boris Herrmann, I faced similar conditions last year in the Transat Jacques Vabre. You're slamming with each wave and it's very wet. You get the impression that the boat is going to split in half and you really feel for her... When that happens, you need to turn off your brain and go for it. What really matters is managing to continue to have a more or less normal life aboard, eating, taking some naps, listening to what the boat is telling you. That is what the sailors are currently going through. They all have their foot on the brake and the foils are certainly retracted.

    "Favourable weather conditions for the three leaders"

    During the evening, the swell will build again reaching seven or eight metres, but it will be more regular. Conditions should allow high speed sailing. From the middle of the night and especially tomorrow morning, the wind should start to ease, but the seas will remain heavy. The three front runners should be getting away from the low-pressure system and entering an area of high pressure. The situation appears to be very favourable for the three leaders. A ridge of high pressure is currently building. They are likely just about to make it through with a bit of wind. This ridge of high pressure will be much harder to cross for those chasing them. The frontrunners should extend their lead with the gaps widening.

    I'm also keeping an eye on what is happening behind them. I'm pleasantly surprised by Alan Roura, who is having a great race with an older IMOCA. I'm also closely watching my old friend, Boris Herrmann, who found it hard to get across the trough, but he seems to be sailing quite fast. He will soon be able to make the most of more favourable conditions for his foiler.

    I was very saddened to hear about Isabelle Joschke dismasting. I have seen that Romain too is turning back. Like everyone, I would have loved to have seen Charal go all the way. But I'm not really surprised as that IMOCA was only recently launched. Ocean racing is a mechanical sport and the boats require a lot of adjustments. However, I remain convinced that having launched his boat a year before all the other new IMOCAs, Jérémie Beyou will in the end have a huge advantage in terms of reliability."

    Thomas Ruyant
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  5. #25
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    Goodchild and Joschke dismasted as gale hits

    The much-anticipated storm in the Bay of Biscay has now hit the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe fleet and two skippers have seen their race come to an abrupt end with the loss of their rigs, while others are heading for shelter of French and Spanish ports.

    The second night of racing proved brutal for British skipper Sam Goodchild who was dismasted while lying in third place in Class40 on Narcos Mexico and Franco-German racer Isabelle Joschke whose mast also broke on her IMOCA, MONIN. Both skippers are safe and are heading for port.

    “Sam was in third place and going well in 30 knots of south-southwesterly wind,” Goodchild’s team manager Marcus Hutchinson commented this morning. “He has no idea as yet why the rig failed. He has cut the mast and rigging free but has saved the boom and so will try to set a jury rig.”

    Route du Rhum Race Director Jacques Caraes summarised: “It has been a difficult night with 40-45 knots of wind for the main part of the fleet and cross seas of five to six metres. The problems we have heard of from skippers have been with their autopilots. But it has been very difficult to make manoeuvres in the seas and wind. Changing sails has been very hard work. But thankfully there were no big problems last night.”

    The strong winds of 40-45 knots are associated with the passage of a front during the night. So far it is the light, powerful Multi50s that have felt the worst of the cold front. Class leader Lalou Roucayrol has chosen to be prudent with his Arkema and was heading for shelter in Porto. During the night Roucayol reported winds of 55 knots, gusting to 60, off the Portuguese coast and seas of five metres.

    Meanwhile the two leading boats of Francois Gabart (MACIF) and Francis Joyon (IDEC Sport) in the ULTIME class, have managed to outsprint the worst of the weather and are averaging 20 knots as they pass the latitude of Cape St Vincent, the most southwesterly point of Portugal this morning.
    Gabart has lighter winds ahead of him but has been unable to shake off second-placed Joyon, the tenacious 62-year-old legend of modern solo ocean racing who is just 35 nautical miles behind MACIF.

    Reporting this morning that seas have flattened out, Gabart said: "IDEC is still close to me. We need to keep pushing south to avoid the worst of this weather. There is a little anticyclone which is moving under us and that will be a problem. And the first one of us who can get out of that will have done the job. After that it will be all good.”

    Alex Thomson has had a tough night on HUGO BOSS. His lead in the IMOCA division has shrunk to just eight miles, down from over 20. He is still battling to get west on a very different course to that of his French rivals further south and he will have had bigger seas to contend with than his rivals. Second-placed Vincent Riou on PRB and Paul Meilhat, third on SMA are now 135 miles to the southeast of the British skipper.

    During the small hours of the morning Jérémie Beyou met with a tug chartered by his team and he is making for Lorient on board Charal which has technical problems with its steering gear.

    In the Class40 fleet, the leader is Yoann Richomme who is 15 miles ahead of his nearest pursuer and is able to ease back to preserve his new, relatively untested Class40 through the nasty depression which is forecast to last through the next 24 hours.

    In fourth place this morning Phil Sharp, the British skipper on IMERYS CLEAN ENERGY, is well positioned within a group of strong French skippers.

    Three of the smallest Multi Rhum entries, including Charlie Capella’s famous Acapella are scurrying for safety on the French coast. “There is no possibility for them to keep racing just now,” Caraes commented. Loick Peyron on Happy still had 60 miles to make it to the Spanish port of Gijon or a bay nearby where he hopes to take shelter.


    *****************************

    At the end of the second day of the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe an Atlantic storm that had been forecast at the start has been making itself felt across the whole fleet with one boat capsized, two dismasted and many sailors electing to seek shelter in French and Spanish ports.

    The most serious incident of an action-packed 24 hours, as the fleet continued west and south out of the Bay of Biscay into the Atlantic proper, was the capsize by French former Vendée Globe winner, Armel Le Cléac’h, on board Maxi Solo Banque Populaire IX.

    The big blue and white trimaran was running in third place in the depleted ULTIME class when its port float snapped off in 30-35 knots of wind and five-metre waves. The boat then turned over but Le Cléac’h was reported to be safe inside his central hull about 340 nautical miles northeast of the Azores.

    As the maritime rescue coordination centre (CROSS) at Griz Nez in northern France took control of the operation to rescue Le Cléac’h, Jacques Caraës, the Race Director, explained how Le Cléac’h’s second capsize this year in this boat unfolded - his first one came during a training sail off Morocco in April.

    “We received a call from CROSS at 13.23hrs French time after Armel activated his distress beacon,” he said. “Ronan Lucas the Banque Populaire team manager informed us that the boat has capsized and that Armel is inside and safe in the central hull. He is gathering all his safety and survival equipment while he is waiting for rescue.

    “He is 450 nautical miles from Lisbon and 320 nautical miles from Punta Delgada, so slightly closer to the Azores,” added Caraës. “It is too far away for a helicopter to go to the site, but we know via the Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre that a plane is flying over to check out the situation. Armel is OK and is getting ready to be evacuated.”


    Earlier in the day there were two dismastings. In the IMOCA division the Franco-German sailor Isabelle Joschke lost her rig when holding seventh position and had to turn back towards the French coast. Then the same fate befell the British skipper Sam Goodchild on board Narcos Mexico in the Class40 fleet.

    Goodchild, one of the pre-start favourites in the 53-strong fleet of Class40s, was making up ground and had climbed to third place when the rig suddenly gave way in 30-35 knots of wind and big seas.

    “I had just picked up a few places,” Goodchild reported. “I went down below and started to tidy up and then there was a big bang. I came up on deck and the whole rig was in the water and we were drifting over the top of it.”

    Goodchild has now erected a jury rig using the boat’s boom and stormsail and is heading to the French port of Brest. “I’m massively disappointed,” he added. “My aim for the Route du Rhum was not to have any regrets and I honestly don’t think there was something I could have done differently in hindsight.”

    While the majority of the 123 skippers continued blasting their way along the 3,542-mile course towards Point-à-Pitre in Guadeloupe, there were nearly 50 boats that were either seeking shelter along the French and Spanish coasts or heading back towards the French coast with technical issues that were preventing them from continuing at this stage.

    These include three in the ULTIME class, six IMOCAS, 12 Class40s and a total of 27 in the combined Rhum Mono and Multi classes. Among them in the IMOCA fleet is the French skipper Jérémie Beyou whose brand new Charalhas developed issues with its steering system and Beyou is heading for Lorient.

    Racing wise the fleet continues to be led by François Gabart on MACIF in the ULTIME class who is now passing to the north of Madeira and is almost completely through the worst of the weather with around 2,600 miles to sail.

    Gabart has been going fast but he has not been able to shake off his fellow countryman Francis Joyon on IDEC Sport who has been tracking his every move in an older boat and at 62 years of age is showing that he has not lost his competitive edge. Joyon was just over 40 miles behind MACIF after 48 hours of racing.

    n the Multi50 fleet the early leader Lalou Roucayrol opted to take refuge in a port close to the Spanish-Portuguese border. Behind him Armel Tripon on Reaute Chocolat looked to be heading in too but as he got close to the coast he changed his mind and has now headed off out to sea. Currently fourth, this could be a potentially race-winning move for Tripon.

    In the IMOCA class, whose skippers will be contending with more rough weather conditions overnight, the chess game at the front between the three leading boats continues to unfold, with leader Alex Thomson on Hugo Boss still prospering from his lone move to the north of the fleet.

    Thomson is currently about 200 miles north of second-placed Vincent Riou in PRBand 30 miles ahead of him in terms of distance to the finish. Paul Meilhat in SMA continues to hold a very impressive third place, 15 miles behind PRB.

    Like the IMOCAs, the Class40 skippers have got a lot of tough sailing ahead of them with gale force winds and big seas on the menu overnight. The leader continues to be Yoann Richomme of France on Veedol-AIC with Aymeric Chappelier on AINA Enfance Avenir now in second after trading places with Britain’s Phil Sharp on IMERYS CLEAN ENERGY who has also had to deal with a broken spinnaker halyard.

    Sharp revealed today that he had to climb his mast to retrieve the halyard after it broke on Sunday night. “The sail dropped straight into the water, so I stopped the boat and caught it quickly before (I hope) any damage,” he reported.

    “This halyard is essential for flying our most important foresails in this race – the small and medium spinnaker, so I had to find a solution, and quickly. The only option was to climb the mast, and with the wave height expected to increase significantly for the next few days I had to get the job done.”

    The 52-year-old American sailor Michael Hennessey has been enjoying his first solo transatlantic race and is holding an excellent 21st position in the Class40 fleet on board Dragon.

    “After yesterday's transition through the ridge into the northerlies, then back into the southerlies, last night was a classic,” he said. “Winds built to sustained 35 knots and gusts to 40. Sea height was four metres and Dragon took flying lessons. And while her launch is pretty good, her landing needs some work.

    “No damage,” he added, “but there was some clean-up to do this morning when the winds settled down a bit. I’m taking a short hitch south, then back west. Getting ready for another rough one tonight.”

    In the amateur Rhum Multi class Pierre Antoine on Olmix is out on his own, 70 miles ahead of his nearest pursuer, Alain Delhumeau on Rayon Vert.

    In the Rhum Mono division Sidney Gavignet on Café Joyeux has an even bigger lead of just over 100 miles on fellow Frenchman Wilfrid Clerton on the big monohull Cap Au Cap Location-SOS Villages D’Enfants.
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  6. #26
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    For the Banque Populaire, he would have capsized after taking off in a By falling back, the front arm would have broken and trained the capsized. We think of armel and those who will help him in this difficult sea.




    Thomas Coville on sodebo ultim' won't leave. End of race.

    Thomas Coville, skipper of sodebo ultim': " when I found out that the front arm was cracked, I really hesitated to continue. We're gonna have to diagnose what happened to learn and understand. They're expensive learning. High-level sport is an incredible requirement. Repairs will be too long to allow us to go back to race.
    It's probably a disappointment because I was in my race. Even if it's manly, sailing to 35 knots is the most awesome thing I've ever done in a boat. It makes magical regattas and fantastic matches. I was very impressed by the speed and mastery of gitana's race ".

    Remade - use it again on the podium of the ultimate class!



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  7. #27
    Broken boats, broken plans.

    Expensive race this one is.

  8. #28
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    November 6th Highlights



    Watch the full update from day 2 of the race with the Atlantic storm that had been forecast at the start making itself felt across the whole fleet with:
    ➡️ One boat capsized
    ➡️ Two boats dismasted
    ➡️ Many sailors electing to seek shelter in 🇫🇷 and 🇪🇸 ports.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  9. #29

    Franck Cammas on Ultimates

    Frank Cammas on the Ultimates: Route du Rhum. Franck Cammas, l’œil de l’expert https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/ro...8-12126443.php

    The capsizing caused by the breakage of the Banque Populaire float marked the spirits of the sailors in the race and also observers on the ground. One can well imagine the great disappointment of the whole team of Armel, welded behind his skipper and with whom he had meticulously prepared this race since the launching of the boat more than a year ago.

    These sometimes spectacular breaks have always marked the history of ocean racing: a human adventure certainly but also perhaps above all technological! Through these major nautical events, architects, engineers, sailors and constructors are constantly pushing the boundaries of their knowledge through, among other things, more and more numerous and advanced simulations, ever more rigorous material testing and even more construction processes. developed.

    But we realize, as in recent days, that the most effective learning remains and will remain in situ navigation, facing an ocean environment that will always surprise the engineer in front of his computer and its digital tools.

    It is important not to judge these accidents comprehensively by drawing simplistic and often incoherent conclusions. It is so easy when one is far from the record to give lessons and find at all costs officials or only to affirm that these boats are fragile as if it became a fatality.

    No ! Because the maturity of a new class of boats like the Ultimate also goes through these events difficult to digest. We must roll up our sleeves, understand step by step what has happened and advance the state of the art. Even if we are in a much more modest activity and without any measure, let us remember terrible accidents and loss of life in the space adventure. And yet, we ended up setting foot on the moon! So today we have to support the teams in these difficult times and help them to make the transition so that this great class continues to excite and excite us.

    Franck Cammas

  10. #30
    Ya can't make an omlette without breaking a few eggs

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