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Thread: Spindrift Goes Code Green

  1. #11
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Spindrift 2 515 nm In Advance

    Weather forecast from our router Jean-Yves Bernot:

    STILL WITH THE SOUTH ATLANTIC TRADES




    The trade winds in the South Atlantic are fairly dependable and, at this time of year are fairly consistent at between 15-18 knots of wind from the east with a few squalls to spice things up a bit! Therefore during this relatively smooth route towards the south, the team is recuperating from the hard work of the north Atlantic.

    While this is the current situation, going forward things will get a little more difficult.

    The anticyclone around St Helena is being further aggravated by the remains of Thursday's cold front from the south, so Spindrift 2 will have to tiptoe through areas of weak and variable winds to avoid getting bogged down.





    If they are successful and if by Saturday they can reach 40S to catch the first area of low pressure, then they will be in 30-35 knot west to north westerly winds, with albatrosses, big seas and everything that the south has to offer.


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  2. #12
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    Day 6: Passing the St Helena High



    FULL MOON!
    "We entered the Doldrums at 2° North: they were not very active, so we had to get through in relatively little breeze, but it was especially nice to have the full moon when we crossed the equator: we even saw the eclipse! It was beautiful for a good hour ... Everyone has really been on the pace and the modifications that we made to the coach roof have been a real bonus - we are definitely less exposed. The route to the equator was not easy: we had quite lumpy seas in the lead up to the islands, then we had to gybe a lot and pass right through the Canaries and Cape Verde archipelagos.” Commented Yann Guichard, a few moments after crossing the equator, the ‘line’ separating the north and south hemispheres.

    However, the team is not out of the Doldrums yet, as they are currently stretching some 120 miles to the south of the Equator. The team will have a challenging six hours or so before they can hook into the south easterly trade winds blowing off Brazil. But the good news is that a strong front is due to leave Cape Frio (off Rio de Janeiro) on Tuesday.

    "We will leave the Doldrums at about 2° South, and then we will have to get around St. Helena anticyclone that is forming to the East, so we will have to go to about 37° South before turning left towards the Indian Ocean. It makes the route longer, especially as we will have to cross a light weather area in three days, but we should then reach favourable NW winds. It will be a relatively slow descent ... but we should be a little ahead of Francis Joyon and his crew by the time we reach Cape Aiguilles," continued the skipper of Spindrift 2.

    The next goal is the tip of South Africa: Francis Joyon and his crew crossed the longitude of the Cape Aiguilles after 12d 21h 22' at sea. So, with a 23 hour advantage on this first stretch, Yann Guichard and his crew can hope to stay half a day ahead before entering the Indian Ocean. This same trimaran, when it was Banque Populaire in 2012, took less than twelve days from Ushant (11d 23h 50').

    Spindrift 2 still has some 3,200 miles to reach this longitude but the black and gold trimaran has been averaging 26 knots since leaving Ushant, and covering more than 620 miles a day – including the passage through the Doldrums!













    TRACKER







    On Monday 21 January at 07h45 UTC, Spindrift 2 broke her own record by just over an hour, by crossing the Equator in 4 days 19 hours 57 minutes. This also gave the black and gold team an advantage of more than 23 hours (180 miles) over the current holders of the Trophy Jules Verne, IDEC Sport. This is the first challenge in the team’s quest to beat the round the world record. The time for the passage from Ushant to the Equator still has to be officially ratified by the WSSRC (the international organisation that oversees records), but Yann Guichard and his crew can be pleased with this first section of the course, and bettering their own record time, set in 2015 (4d 21h 45'), by 1 hour and 48 minutes.
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  3. #13
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    Getting Around The St Helena High



    Spindrift 2 has taken a bit of of a hit on their advantage over Francis Joyon's 2017 Jules Verne reference while
    working their way around the St Helena High. But they will soon eject and be hurled into the Southern Ocean where they can hit the accelerator
    once again. Stay tuned!



    http://www.spindrift-racing.com/jules-verne/en/live






    Through the archive video images taken during the 2015-2016 attempt and the testimony of Dona Bertarelli, experience the iconic Jules Verne Trophy. In a series of videos that take us around the world, discover the surprises of the course and the riches of the oceans crossed by Spindrift and her crew. In this second episode, we cross the southern Atlantic to reach the Capes of Good Hope and Aiguilles, going around the anticyclone of St Helena.








    Last edited by Photoboy; 01-25-2019 at 11:36 AM.
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    400 NM Lead For Spindrift



    Now on the wave/storm train. Spindrift 2 has started pouring on the miles again.

    With a 24 hour run of 859 nm and currently pushing 34 knots, Spindrift 2 now has advanced to over 400 nm
    lead over Joyons 2017 reference. The Spindrift 2 website is experiencing high volume and you may experience
    delays in getting live tracker to cooperate: http://www.spindrift-racing.com/jules-verne/en/live





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    12 1/2 Day To The Indian Ocean




    After 12 days, 14 hours, 58 minutes, Spindrift 2 reached the longitude of Cape Agulhas on Tuesday at 0240 UTC (0340 French Time), sailing from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. Whilst maintaining the lead on Francis Joyon and his teams’ world record of 6 hours 43 minutes. In order to reach this point of Africa, Yann Guichard and his eleven crew members had to sail around the Saint Helena anticyclone to be able to benefit from the downwind sailing of the Southern Ocean, in other words, a 700-miles round tour…


    The first of the three symbolic Capes of this round the world sailing race, the Cape of Good Hope, was reached after just 12 days 13 hours 8 minutes: one of the best ever times of the Trophée Jules Verne, which first started in 1993. But it was several miles away to the South East, at Cape Agulhas, where the time reference comes into its own as this point of Africa marks the entrance into the Indian Ocean. However, in order to reach it, Spindrift 2 had to navigate around the Saint Helena anticyclone, go through an oceanic ridge and finally, take a left before heading towards Cape Agulhas.

    Despite this detour, which forced the black and gold trimaran to dive South up to 43°, Yann Guichard and his 11 crew members keep a lead: 6 hours and 43 minutes, (equivalent to 300 miles) on the reference time of IDEC Sport, the current record holder. As a result, Spindrift 2 took 12 days, 14 hours, 58 minutes from Ushant to reach Cape Angulhas, and from the equator, 7 days 17 hours to go beyond this point in Africa.





    A favourable Indian Ocean?
    « “We had to take a large detour to get around the Saint Helena anticyclone: we had to go down to 40° South before turning left! It was pretty extreme, but we didn’t have any other way of cutting across: we just had to grin and bear it, especially as we had had a crosswind and head seas which weren’t easy to navigate through… For three days we’ve been stepping up the pace and it feels good: we’ve just reached the Cape of Good Hope and we’re sticking to the targets we set out for ourselves.” » said Yann Guichard after reaching Cape Angulhas.

    Taking confidence from this reference time entering the Indian Ocean, which remains the third best time in the Trophée Jules Verne, the skipper, his crew and their onshore router, Jean-Yves Bernot, are pretty comfortable about the next stage as the Mascareignes Anticyclone (Southern Madagascar) is well placed on Crozet Island and will start to head North over the next few days towards the Kerguelen archipelago, pushed by a southern depression. At an average speed of over 35 knots for 3 days, the black and gold trimaran will be able to hold this steady pace through a relatively manageable ocean heading to south of the Kerguelen!




    “The sun has been up for a couple of hours and we really know we’re in the Indian Ocean! We’ll be reaching 50° South soon, the weather’s grey and temperature of the water is 2°C… But with albatross at our side, it’s amazing! The conditions are on our side to help us reach Kerguelen quickly. We’ll leave the Kerguelen to the North as we’ll undoubtedly go down to 53-54° south. However, we’ll also have icebergs ahead of us from Wednesday: we’ll need to keep watch on the radar and with our infrared glasses. It’s looking a bit tense… We should sail the length of the anticyclone while being powered along by the southern winds: it’s looking pretty good up to the Kerguelen, but after that, we’ll have several gybes to go which will slow us down a little. We should still get through the Indian Ocean quickly without wasting too much time and hope to get to the Pacific, South of Tasmania with too much delay.”» Mentioned the skipper on Spindrift 2.

    If this southerly course enables the team to shorten their route while benefiting from a sustained current, going down to 53° South would present them with the problem of drifting ice and where a number of icebergs have been clearly located by the CLS satellites. On this stretch of the route, Spindirft 2 needs to be very fast because Francis Joyon and his crew made the Indian Ocean crossing extremely quickly as they still hold the WSSRC record (5d 21h 8m)! Having said that, the capabilities of the black and gold trimaran in the breeze give hope that it will retain the lead on IDEC Sport’s timing to South of Tasmania, the hot spot between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific.



    TRACKER






    Weather Forecast by Jean-Yves Bernot
    The Tunnel

    Spindrift continues its descent towards 53 S. It is a matter of correctly positioning the boat in the Indian Ocean to keep in the strong winds that are synonymous with high speeds. The weather situation has not really evolved over the next couple of days, and we are still ahead of the cold front from the South Atlantic. It's called FF2 and we are quite familiar with each other now now! The wind is 25-30kt from the WNW with a sea swell 5 to 6 m.

    The Southern Indian Ocean does not have a very good reputation among sailors. It's called the ‘tunnel’ as the route through is between the ridge of high pressure that extends along at 45S and the ice that can be found at 53S. Between the two are the southern depressions that blow from the NW to the SW associated with the passages of cold fronts. The wind is often strong, the seas quite heavy and the sky overcast.

    The temperature of the water is about 3 to 4°C and can be 2°C in patches coming from the south, and this is what the icebergs like.

    While it is not the most ideal place to be, it is fascinating. It is something that is lived with intensity and with a huge desire to get through it as quickly as possible.


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    Spindrift 2's Vacillating Lead Remains Strong



    15 days into the Jules Verne Record attempt, Spindrift 2 maintains a 260 nm lead over IDEC Spots 2017 pace.

    The see-saw nautical milelead has vacillated between a high of 536 to a low of 90 or so since start two weeks ago.

    The team has 25 days, 18 hours and change at this typing to finish to beat the record.


















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  7. #17
    Have to say, that covered cockpit looks downright comfortable.

  8. #18
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    Spindrift Suffers Rudder Damage, Falls Behind Record Pace




    At 1606h UTC Yann Guichard, skipper of Spindrift 2, contacted his technical team ashore to report damage to the starboard rudder. Spindrift racing is challenging for the Jules Verne Trophy. It is currently night for the crew of Spindrift 2, which has hampered their assessment of the situation. The boat is currently in the Indian Ocean, sailing at 15 knots and some 1200 miles off Cape Leeuwin.





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  9. #19
    Lots of things to hit in the dark going 30 plus knots!

  10. #20
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    UPDATE: Jules Verne Record Attempt Aborted....

    At 19h UTC Yann Guichard, the skipper of Spindrift 2, contacted his technical team ashore to report damage to the structure of the starboard rudder. Spindrift racing is challenging for the Jules Verne Trophy.

    Having made a full assessment of the damage and possible repairs, the team has reluctantly concluded that they are unable to make the necessary repairs without compromising the safety and performance of the 40m trimaran.

    "Because of this technical problem we have no choice but to stop this record attempt. It is a huge disappointment to all of the crew. We are now heading to the south east coast of Australia and expect to reach there in the next four days," confirmed Yann Guichard
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