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Thread: Newport Getting Lousy With 12 Meters

  1. #1
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    Newport Getting Lousy With 12 Meters





    DECADES LATER, CHAMPIONS RETURN TO CLAIM 12 METRE WORLD TITLE
    NEWPORT, RI (May 14, 2019) – When the 12 Metre World Championship comes to Newport, R.I. this summer (July 8-13), it will celebrate one of the greatest classes in world sailing history. The 112-year-old International 12 Metre Class encompasses a living history of racing yacht design by the world’s foremost naval architects who pushed their designs to the very limits of innovation. The resulting boats represented the pinnacle of yacht development from 1907-1987 for the highest levels of international sailing competition: the Olympic Games (1908-1920) and the America’s Cup (1958-1987).

    “It’s going to make quite a statement to the world when 21 of these historic 12 Metres – the largest gathering ever in the U.S. – converge in Newport and it becomes clear that they are still being sailed at such a high level,” said Gary Jobson (Annapolis, Md.), who will serve as tactician aboard Courageous (US-26), an Olin Stephens design that will be helmed by Arthur Santry (Washington, D.C./Newport, R.I.) in the Modern class, for 12 Metres built between 1967 and 1983. (Santry also crewed on the 12 Metre Independence (US-28) in 1977.)

    Courageous was the first all-aluminum hulled 12 Metre and the second 12 Metre to successfully defend the America’s Cup twice, in 1974 and 1977. The first 12 Metre, also an Olin Stephens design, was the wooden-hulled Intrepid (US-22), which successfully defended in 1967 and ’70 and will also sail in the Modern Division with skipper Jack Curtin (Toronto, Ontario/New York, N.Y.) at the helm.



    all pics ©BlockIslandSteve









    “Courageous is in the best shape she’s ever been in,” said Jobson, explaining that her benefactors Ralph Isham, Steve Glascock, Alexander Auersperg and Ward Marsh (all Newport, R.I.), who also crew aboard her, lead a syndicate formed 15 years ago to charter the yacht after it was donated to the Museum of Yachting. “There has been some work on her keel, rudder and trim tab over this past winter, and she will be sporting new winches and sails. Our goal is to win every race, but you never know in this division. Otherwise, it’s to be a strong contender, to put on a good show and get better with each race.”

    It just so happens Jobson was the tactician on Courageous in 1977 when Ted Turner defeated Alan Bond’s Australia (KA-5) four races to zero in a best-of-seven series. Turner’s America’s Cup victory (his second try) came long before he was a television media mogul, but with his famously quick wit and tell-it-like-it-is character, he was already well on his way to becoming an authentic American sailing hero. Turner plans to return to Newport to watch the Worlds, and he will be pleased to see Jobson and his fellow sailors from that era making Courageous spotlight-worthy again.

    Significantly, four others on the Courageous crew of 16 have won the “Auld Mug” at some point in their lives. Jon Wright, who will serve as jib trimmer, sailed on three America’s Cup winners: Courageous in ’74, Freedom (US-30) in ’80 and Stars & Stripes (US-55) in ’87 (he also sailed on Independence in ’77 and Liberty (US-40) in ’83.) LJ Edgcomb, who will serve as navigator, sailed on Courageous in ’74 and ‘77 (he also sailed on Courageous again in ’80). Robbie Doyle will serve as main trimmer, just as he did on Courageous in ’77 (he also sailed on Mariner (US-25) in ’74 and Courageous again in ’80); Stu Argo, who will serve as jib trimmer, sailed on America3 in ’92 (he coached the All Women’s team on America3 in ’95 and raced on Oracle Team USA in 2007).










    According to Jack Curtin, who salvaged Intrepid in as a “massive labor of love” after it ran aground on Nantucket, his crew hasn’t changed much from when it was first assembled in 1998, after a two-year complete restoration of the yacht. “I’m most proud that we don’t bring in any rock stars,” said Curtin. “It’s staggering the amount of time people are willing to sacrifice for this summer’s racing schedule, but that’s how strongly everyone feels about each other.”

    Among Intrepid’s crew members are two father-son combinations. Travis Pierce, son of starboard trimmer Reggie Pierce (Courageous ‘74, Independence ’77), will work the bow, while Ian O’Brien, son of port trimmer Tom O’Brien (Courageous ’74, Independence ‘77), will work the pit. Other America’s Cup veterans crewing are tactician Scott Perry (Independence ’77) and main trimmer Skip Beck (Clipper (US-32) ‘80).

    “We’ve started practicing already, so we are serious, and we’ve done whatever we thought we could do to make us more competitive,” said Curtin, noting he has now completed major improvements to Intrepid a total of four times (including this year in preparation for the Worlds). He pointed out other American owners such as Dennis Williams, Charles Robertson, Jack LeFort and Gunther Buerman – owners, respectively, of Victory ’83 (K-22), Freedom (US-30), Challenge XII (KA-10) and New Zealand (KZ-3) – who have invested great amounts of money and effort into either restoring or totally rebuilding the magnificent 12 Metres that will be racing in the Worlds.










    “In addition to being as beautiful and significant as ever, the fleet is the fastest it has ever been,” said Curtin. “Every boat that’s racing is in better shape than when it first sailed decades ago.”

    The 12 Metre World Championship is hosted by Ida Lewis Yacht Club, the International Twelve Metre Association (ITMA) America’s Fleet and the 12 Metre Yacht Club.


    GRAND PRIX DIVISION
    Kiwi Magic (KZ-7) Johan Blach Petersen, Arhus, Denmark

    Kookaburra II (KA-12) Patrizio Bertelli, Porto Santo Stefano, Italy

    Legacy (KZ-5) (nee Laura) Jesper Bank, Denmark

    New Zealand (KZ-3) Gunther Buerman, Highland Beach, Fla./Newport, RI


    MODERN DIVISION
    Challenge XII (KA-10), Jack LeFort, Jamestown, RI

    Courageous (US-26) Ralph Isham / Steve Glascock / Alexander Auersperg / Ward Marsh / Arthur Santry, Newport, RI

    Defender (US-33) Dick Enersen, San Francisco, CA

    Enterprise (US-27) Clay & Nancy Deutsch, Newport, RI

    Freedom (US-30)Charles Robertson, Guilford, CT

    Intrepid (US-22) Jack Curtin, Toronto, Canada / New York, NY

    Lionheart (K-18) Harry Graves, Grand Isle, VT

    Victory ’83 (K-22) Dennis Williams, Hobe Sound, FL / Newport, RI


    TRADITIONAL DIVISION
    American Eagle (US-21) Bob Morton, Newport RI

    Columbia (US-16) Kevin Hegarty, Newport, RI

    Easterner (US-18) Scott Bernard, Annapolis, MD

    Nefertiti (US-19)Sears Wullschleger, Sarasota, FL

    Weatherly (US-17)Newport, RI



    VINTAGE DIVISION
    Blue Marlin (K-17)Henrik Andersin, Kotka, Finland

    Nyala (US-12)Patrizio Bertelli, Porto Santo Stefano, Italy

    Onawa (US-6)Jim Blanusha / Steven Gewirz / Jouis Girard / Earl McMillen / Mark Watson, Newport, RI

    Vema III (N-11) Vema Syndicate, Oslo, Norway



    12 METRE SPIRIT
    America II (US-42)New York Harbor Sailing Foundation, New York, NY

    America II (US-46)New York Harbor Sailing Foundation, New York, NY

    Other potential competitors:

    Heritage (US-23)


    https://12mrworlds.com/
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  2. #2
    Good to see the boats of yesteryear back together.

    Somebody should spike the punch with prune juice!

  3. #3
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    12 Meter Tune Up Before The Worlds




    NEWPORT TROPHY REGATTA SHOWDOWN WON BY COLUMBIA, CHALLENGE XII AND NEW ZEALAND
    NEWPORT, R.I. (June 30 2019) – The Newport Trophy Regatta hosted by Ida Lewis Yacht Club and held this weekend (June 29-30) for ten 12 Metres, gave a sneak preview of the intense racing to come in July’s 12 Metre World Championship, where 21 of the historic boats will compete. The regatta was started by Ida Lewis Yacht Club during Newport’s America’s Cup days as a fleet-racing competition for all eliminated would-be defenders and challengers for the America’s Cup. The event has been held annually since, typically hosting the 12 Metres in the Americas fleet that make Newport their home.

    This year’s regatta was comprised of three ‘round-the-buoy races – held on Saturday in medium air and lumpy wave conditions on Rhode Island Sound – followed on Sunday by a race around Conanicut Island that was part of the International Yacht and Athletic Club’s Newport Cup regatta.


    all images © George Bekris






    Columbia (US-16) won its Traditional Division in a tie-breaker over American Eagle (US-21) but also won the IYAC Newport Cup overall when it was dual-scored for that race under PHRF handicap. Columbia has been chartered for the Worlds by Anthony Chiurco (Princeton, N.J.) who helmed the boat while owner Kevin Hegarty (Newport, R.I.) and his crew of 15 years sailed it. “Columbia is faster now than she has ever been,” said Hegerty. “Every year we tweak her to make her quicker, and we’ve done a few things this year to really step it up.

    In the knife fight that was the Modern Division competition, Jack LeFort’s (Jamestown, R.I.) Challenge XII (KA-10) led by only two points over Dennis Williams’ (Hobe Sound, Fla./Newport, R.I.) Victory ’83 (K-22). Challenge XII and Victory ’83 both won two races in their series. (Victory counted the around-the-island race as one of its two.)
    Johan Black Petersen’s Kiwi Magic (KZ-7), here for the Worlds from Denmark, joined Gunther Buerman’s (Highland Beach, Fla./Newport, R.I.) New Zealand (KZ-3) for Saturday’s races in Grand Prix Division while Legacy (KZ-5), chartered by Danes Jesper Bank and Thomas Anderson for the Worlds, made a last-minute decision to sail in the around-the-island race. New Zealand, which won the division, won all the buoy races but succumbed to Legacy in Sunday’s race, finishing second to Legacy’s first.








    “It was great to have three of the ‘plastic fantastics’ out there, and today showed that the boat handling of all three was phenomenal” said New Zealand’s tactician Brad Read, adding that a total of four Grand Prix Division 12 Metres will sail at the Worlds. “In general, it’s really amazing that you have these boats from so many generations competing 30 to 50 years after they were originally built. We’re just so fortunate that we have these great weapons to go sailing on.”

    RESULTS

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    Sailing Into History With 12 Metre Worlds


    Image © Nancy Bloom

    Article by LISA McCURDY/Newport Life


    The 12 Metre World Championship July 8–13 will be the largest gathering of 12 Metre yachts in U.S. history, and the second largest in the world, ever.

    A sailor perches on the foredeck of a 12 Metre–class yacht, ignoring the deafening din of flapping sails and fluttering rigging that engulfs him. The bowman wedges himself onto the forwardmost portion of the deck, craning his neck over the bow as his eyes sweep left to right and back again. He calls out the distance to the start line, the information conveyed to the cockpit by the rest of the crew, who dangle their legs over the rail as they angle for speed.

    The tactician and bowman, wristwatches synchronized, look for the best lane amid the other boats, who are all searching for the same advantage. Too early, and there will be a penalty to pay. Too late, and the rest of the fleet will leave them in their wake.

    The bow smacks into a wave, drenching the bowman, but he doesn’t flinch. The yacht picks up speed, crossing the starting line right as the gun goes off. It’s a clean start.

    Now the real work of the race can begin.


    Image © Richard Schultz


    Image © Lisa McCurdy


    Image © Stephen Cloutier





    Racing 12 Metre yachts is not necessarily new — the class of boats was first introduced in 1907 and has since been regarded in the sailing community as one of the most beautiful, tactically-challenging classic racing fleets in the world. But their return to Newport for the 12 Metre World Championship July 8–13 will be the largest gathering of 12 Metre yachts in U.S. history, and the second largest in the world, ever.

    “I think it will be a spectacular experience of classic, famous boats all on the water at the same time,” says Jack Curtin, owner of Intrepid, one of the 12 Metres racing in Newport this summer.

    12 Metre yachts are a class (or species) of boat designed by some of the sailing world’s most prestigious naval designers, including Olin Stephens, Clinton Crane, William Fife III, Philip Rhodes, Johan Anker and Ben Lexcen. The vessels range from 65 to 75 feet in length, and exactly 180 “12s” have been built worldwide — 120 from wood, 57 from aluminum and three from fiberglass.
    How to Watch

    Newport’s 12 Metre Worlds will be a sight to behold for fans of classic yachts and for those who are new to the sport. From July 8 to 13, most of the fleet will dock at Fort Adams when not racing — at the same docks where the Volvo Ocean Race fleet berths when it’s in town — so that the public can observe the ships up close. Racing ends around 4 p.m. each day. On Saturday, July 13, fans can cheer on their favorite teams during the 12 Metre Parade, when each of the participating yachts will pass by each of the downtown wharves on the eastern side of the harbor (including Bannister’s Wharf and Bowen’s Wharf) before heading out for their final races. Fort Adams, Castle Hill and Beavertail are excellent vantage points to watch the 12 Metres head out to the race course. With binoculars, spectators can also expect to see some of the racing from Brenton Point.
    The 12 Metre class has always been internationally renowned, and the yachts raced in the Olympic Games in 1908, 1912 and 1920, in the America’s Cup in Newport from 1958 to 1983, and in the America’s Cup in Australia in 1987. They have a continued history in Newport, where many are available for private charter, and a number of local residents and New York Yacht Club members own the boats privately. The 12s have enjoyed revivals since the 1990s, Curtin says, but now, thanks to the efforts of many class members and organizers, it’s seeing one of the largest resurgences in recent history.

    In most of their regattas, 12s are divided into different racing divisions, based on a number of factors including age, building materials, and a rating that determines a yacht’s maximum speed capabilities. The 12 Metre Worlds in Newport will feature five divisions with at least 23 yachts. They will sail against each other in smaller races, and will participate in a number of events on and off the water as a full class.


    Image © Stephen Cloutier


    Images © George Bekris


    Image © Richard Schultz


    Over time, many of the older yachts have needed massive restoration, including Curtin’s Intrepid, which he bought and rescued after she ran aground off of Nantucket in 1994. Following the initial two-year project, which Curtin calls “a labor of love or insanity, I’m not sure which,” Intrepid was back on the water. Subsequent restorations were required — including a massive amount of repairs after she was hit by the Oliver Hazard Perry in 2017. Today, the crew of Intrepid includes Curtin and a number of friends who can count their years on the water in decades, as well as sons and daughters of friends and famous sailors from Curtin’s long career. Notably, Intrepid is one of only a handful of yachts in the upcoming 12-Metre Worlds sailed entirely by amateurs. “No hired guns aboard,” says Curtin. “It’s a family experience we wouldn’t trade for anything.”

    The crew of Intrepid includes trimmer Reggie Pierce – who sailed in the America’s Cup twice on two different 12 Metres, winning in 1974 aboard Courageous — and his son, Travis, who will be on the bow. Tom O’Brien (who sailed with the elder Pierce in both Cups) will trim, while his son, Ian, will man the cockpit. Each vessel sails with about 15 sailors; they’re complex and tactical yachts that require all hands on deck (literally) to sail to their best potential.

    Gary Jobson, who will serve in the Worlds as tactician aboard Courageous, has an America’s Cup and Olympic pedigree almost too extensive to list. Most notably for the 12s, Jobson has been integral in keeping the class and regattas alive, and applied particular effort in bringing the 12s to Newport along with Peter Gerard, the vice president of the American fleet, and other primary organizers.

    Jobson’s resume includes three appearances in the America’s Cup, but he is also known worldwide for his commentary on ESPN and other networks for subsequent America’s Cup races, as well as the Olympics. Jobson is one of the most iconic voices in sailing, both on and off the water, and his role as tactician on Courageous will have him guiding a 12 Metre crew once more.




    “The intellectual challenge of being out there is amazing,” Jobson explains. “You have large, heavy boats and they’re very tactical — they take a ton of planning and thinking on the race course. You have to work hard to outwit your competition. Sometimes it’s random — you can never really know what the wind is going to do, but you do the best you can.

    “I’m looking forward to being a part of the spectacle —seeing them come off the start line, all in a line going downwind, very close in speed,” Jobson continues. “It’s cool to see all sorts of boats racing — even the J-22s that race on weeknights in the harbor — but to get so many boats in a 65–70-foot range racing together is simply spectacular.”

    The 12 Metre class participates in a number of “waypoint” events in Newport during the summer, although the Worlds will be the largest gathering by far. The New York Yacht Club’s Annual Regatta in mid-June, the Ida Lewis Yacht Club 12 Metre Trophy Regatta at the end of June, and the Newport Regatta the first week of July all offer an excellent opportunity for Jobson, Curtin and the rest of the fleet’s sailors to get up to speed, strategize amongst the competition, and practice their maneuvers in hopes of taking home the top prize at the World Championship in mid-July.

    “In addition to being as beautiful and significant as ever, the fleet is the fastest it has ever been,” says Curtin. “Every boat that’s racing is in better shape than when it first sailed decades ago.

    “These boats really have stood the test of time,” he adds. “There’s no such thing as a bad-looking 12 Metre ... and they’re a heck of a lot of fun to sail.
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  5. #5
    Looks like a sight to behold.

    If only Newport was not 5.5 hours away in a a jet.
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    Removing The Rust In Rhode Island

    12 METRE PRE-WORLDS: LAST BLAST BEFORE THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
    NEWPORT, R.I. (July 2019) – In preparation for next week’s 12 Metre World Championship (July 8-13) in Newport, R.I., a fleet of 16 12 Metres competed in Sail Newport’s annual Newport Regatta and counted it as their official 12 Metre Pre-Worlds. After five races over two days (July 6-7), New Zealand (KZ-3), Victory ’83, (K-22) Columbia (US-16) and Nyala (US-12) became the names to beat, winning their respective divisions, but not without a fight. This regatta foreshadowed the intense competition to come when 22 of these yachts – considered some of the most iconic in the history of sailboat design and spanning the decades between the 1920s and 1980s – compete at the Worlds.


    all pics © Ian Roman







    “It was unprecedented and awesome to see so many 12 Metres together on Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound (where they sailed, respectively, on Saturday and Sunday),” said 12 Metre Worlds Event Chair Peter Gerard, “And it will be even more spectacular next week when another six 12 Metres join the racing, making it the largest gathering of 12 Metres since the 2001 America’s Cup Jubilee.”



    Victory ‘83 (KA-22), winner in Modern Division at the 12 Metre Pre-Worlds, part of Sail Newport’s Newport Regatta.


    The 12 Metres, most famous as America’s Cup boats but also with ties to the Olympics in the early 1900s, are divided into divisions based mainly on when they were built. They are Grand Prix (for 12 Metres built between 1983 and 1987 with winged keels), Modern (1967-1983), Traditional (1958-1964) and Vintage (1907-1958).

    After two firsts and a second on Saturday, Dennis Williams’ Victory ‘83 (K-22) had four points on Enterprise (US-27) going into Sunday’s Modern Division racing. “We just wanted to sail the racecourse as fast as we could,” said Williams, who won Sunday’s first race by 20 boat lengths or so and “never looked back” after establishing an early lead on the eight-mile twice-around windward-leeward course. “In the second race, a start near the pin end didn’t really work for us; we got pinned out by Intrepid (US-22) and couldn’t sail the course we wanted to sail. We finally got free and ended up second but took a penalty (2 points) for fouling Challenge XII (KA-10) at the weather mark.

    “If you make a mistake you get shot out the back; it’s pretty simple,” said Williams. “You can’t find big boat around-the-buoys racing like this anywhere else. There’s lots of very close competition, and the boats are technically challenging; it’s really a lot of fun. We hope we can go out and show our competitors the way around the course next week!”


    Nyala (US-12), winner in Vintage Division at the 12 Metre Pre-Worlds, part of Sail Newport’s Newport Regatta.


    Nyala (US-12) won all of its races in the Vintage Division, but skipper Mauro Pelaschier said he will have to concentrate to stay ahead of the rest next week. The last time he sailed in Newport was 36 years ago (1983) when he was helmsman for Azzurra (I-4), the first Italian challenger for the America’s Cup. “I’m really happy to be back in Newport where I started my professional sailing life,” said Pelaschier, who has also sailed in three Olympic Games. “My crew is all from Azzurra, too, so we are not only a vintage boat but also a vintage crew,” laughed Pelaschier. “We have sailed together in many regattas, so we always learn, learn, learn. Our boat is competitive for sure, and the crew is ready.”

    New Zealand (KZ-3) with Max Buerman at the helm, edged out Kookaburra (KA-12), steered by Torben Grael in Grand Prix Division, while Columbia (US-16) won Traditional Division over American Eagle (US-21).

    In ROAD TO THE WORLDS Waypoints Series Standings, the point spread is close: Courageous (US-26) is leading with 87 points, while Victory ’83 (K-22) is close behind with 84 points. They are followed by American Eagle (US-21) and Challenge XII (KA-10), each with 82 points.












    (results below)

    2019 Newport Regatta
    Results for 12 Metre Pre-World Regatta

    Grand Prix (One Design – 4 Boats)
    1. New Zealand (KZ-3), Gunther and Maggie Buerman, Highland Beach, FL/Newport, RI, USA – 1 -3 -1 -1 -1 ; 7
    2. Kookaburra II (KA-12), Torben Grael / Patrizio Bertelli , Arezzo, ITA – 2 -1 -2 -2 -2 ; 9
    3. Legacy (KZ-5), Thomas Andersen / Jesper Bank, Munkebo, Fyn, DEN – 3 -2 -3 -3 -3 ; 14
    4. Kiwi Magic (KZ-7), Johan Blach Petersen, Aarhus C, DEN – 4 -4 -4 -4 -4 ; 20

    Modern (One Design – 7 Boats)
    1. Victory ’83 (K-22), Dennis Williams, Hobe Sound, FL/Newport, RI, USA – 1 -2 -1 -1 -4 ; 9
    2. Enterprise (US-27), Clay and Nancy Deutsch, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -1 -4 -3 -1 ; 11
    3. Courageous (US-26), Ralph Isham / Steve Glascock / Alexander Auersperg / Ward Marsh / Arthur Santry, Newport, RI – 3 -5 -3 -2 -3 ; 16
    4. Intrepid (US-22), Jack Curtin, Toronto, Ont, CAN – 6 -4 -2 -6 -6 ; 24
    5. Freedom (US-30), Charles Robertson, Guilford, CT, USA – 5 -5 -5 -5 -5 ; 25
    6. Challenge XII (KA-10) Jack LeFort, Jamestown, RI, USA – 4 -9 -9 -4 -4 ; 30
    7. Defender (US-33), Tom Webster, Hilton Head, SC and Dick Enersen, San Rafael, CA, USA – 7 -6 -9 -7 -7 ; 36

    Traditional (2 Boats)
    1. Columbia (US-16), Kevin Hegarty / Anthony Chiurco, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -1 -2 -1 -1 ; 7
    2. American Eagle (US-21), Eagle 2019 Syndicate, Middletown, RI, USA – 1 -2 -1 -2 -2 ; 8

    Vintage (3 Boats)
    1. Nyala (US-12), Mauro Pelaschier / Patrizio Bertelli, Arezzo, ITA – 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 ; 5
    2. Blue Marlin (FIN-1), Henrik Andersin, Kaunianen, FIN – 2 -2 -2 -2 -2 ; 10
    3. Onawa (US-6), Jim Blanusha / Steven Gewirz / Louis Girard / Earl McMillen / Mark Watson, Newport, RI, USA – 4 -3 -3 -3 -3 ; 16

    The 2019 12 Metre World Championship is sponsored by Château d’Esclans -Whispering Angel, Grand Banks Yachts, Gurney’s Marina and Resort, MJM Yachts, North Sails and Vhernier Milano. Official suppliers include Bacardi, Barton & Gray Mariners Club, Code Zero, Harborside Marina, Helly Hansen Newport, McMillen Yachts, Quantum Sails, Robbe & Berking Classics, Sevenstar Yacht Transport, Stella Artois and Trident Studio. Event venue partners are Clarke Cooke House, Ida Lewis Yacht Club, International Yacht Restoration School, Newport Shipyard, Sail Newport and Seamen’s Church Institute. For more information please visit: https://12mrworlds.com/partners/

    A full list of competitors is here: https://12mrworlds.com/2019-competitors/

    ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL 12 METRE CLASS
    The 112 year-old International 12 Metre Class encompasses a living history of racing yacht design by the world’s foremost naval architects including Olin Stephens, Clinton Crane, William Fife III, Philip Rhodes, Johan Anker, Ben Lexcen and more who pushed their designs to the very limits of innovation. The resulting boats represented the pinnacle of yacht development from 1907-1987 for the highest levels of international sailing competition– the Olympic Games (1908-1920) and the America’s Cup (1958-1987). www.12mrclass.com

    For more information on the Pre-Worlds Regatta or the 12 Metre Worlds visit https://12mrworlds.com/ or contact Peter Gerard at pgerard53@gmail.com.
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  7. #7
    Beautiful stuff, legendary vessels and good folk.

  8. #8
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    12 Metre World Championships Day 1



    12 METRE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP: AND THEY’RE OFF!
    NEWPORT, R.I. (July 2019) – After a postponement ashore and then on the water this morning, a light breeze filled in nicely for the most part of two races on Rhode Island Sound at the 12 Metre World Championship hosted by Ida Lewis Yacht Club and organized by the International Twelve Metre Association’s (ITMA) Americas Fleet. The five-day event started today amidst much anticipation and excitement for the spectacle of such a large gathering of 12 Metres on one stage. Racing were 21 of the historic yachts, with many of those having once sailed in America’s Cup competitions here in Newport from 1958-1983 (Modern and Traditional Divisions); some having been built with winged keels specifically for the 1987 Cup (Grand Prix Division); and some dating as far back as the 1920s (Vintage Division). A 12 Metre Spirit Division also sailed.



    all images © Ian Roman






    Today’s first race, on a twice-around windward/leeward course of nearly 7 miles, was completed in 9-11 knots, but during the second race, sailed in a similar manner, the wind died enough so that the Race Committee felt it prudent to shorten course.

    Courageous (US-26), topped the Modern Division on a tiebreaker with Challenge XII (KA-10), and did so even after a premature start in the second race. Famous for being one of just two 12 Metres to have won the America’s Cup twice (1974 and 1977), Courageous is owned by a Newport syndicate comprised of Ralph Isham, Steve Glascock, Alexander Auersperg and Ward Marsh and skippered by Arthur Santry. Gary Jobson, who won the ’77 Cup aboard Courageous as tactician for Ted Turner, is filling the same role at the Worlds and today had some interesting decisions to make.









    “The good news is everybody had a good attitude; no one got down when we were over the line early,” said Jobson. “It was a day of picking wind shifts, and we got some good ones. We passed a couple of boats on each leg to win.”

    Isham, who sails on the boat with the other syndicate members, said it helped to be behind to see what was happening to others. “With the shifts it could have been anybody’s day, but Jobson made some great decisions and got us right back into the race. In the first race on the upwind leg we couldn’t separate ourselves from Challenge XII and Victory ’83 (K-22). We finally got around Victory ‘83, but Challenge XII won by 25 seconds”

    The Danish team aboard Legacy (KZ-5), skippered by Thomas Andersen, won both its races today in Grand Prix Division.









    “It definitely was not easy,” said Legacy’s tactician Jesper Bank. “In the first race we were leading around the marks but not by much. In the second race we were with New Zealand (KZ-3) and Kiwi Magic (KZ-7) on the left and Kookaburra II (KA-12) was on the right, so we knew early on that we needed to win the group on the left. We were the first boat to come in from the left but Kookaburra II was slightly ahead. Then we took advantage of a massive wind shift on the downwind leg. When the wind died on the second beat and the Race Committee finished us at the top mark, we were lucky enough to be leading.”

    American Eagle (US-21) topped the Traditional class while Onawa (US-6) and America II (US-42) won the Vintage Division and 12 Metre Spirit Division, respectively.

    In reflecting on the overall picture, Gary Jobson said, “It’s two races down and seven to go, but the coolest thing is having all these 12 Metres sailing together. It’s the biggest thing in the U.S. in sailing this summer.”

    2019 12 Metre Worlds
    Day One (July 9)

    12mR – Grand Prix (4 Boats)
    1. Legacy, Thomas Andersen / Jesper Bank, Munkebo, Fyn, den – 1 -1 ; 2
    2. New Zealand, Gunther & Maggie Buerman, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -2 ; 4
    3. Kookaburra II, Torben Grael / Patrizio Bertelli, Arezzo, ITA – 3 -3 ; 6
    4. Kiwi Magic, Johan Blach Petersen, Aarhus C, DEN – 4 -4 ; 8

    12mR – Modern (8 Boats)
    1. Courageous, Ralph Isham / Steve Glascock / Alexander Auersperg / Ward Marsh, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -1 ; 3
    2. Challenge 12, Jack LeFort, Jamestown, RI, USA – 1 -2 ; 3
    3. Enterprise, Clay & Nancy Deutsch, Newport, RI, USA – 3 -4 ; 7
    4. Intrepid, Jack Curtin, Toronto, Ont, CAN – 6 -3 ; 9
    5. Victory ’83, Dennis Williams, Hobe Sound, FL, USA – 4 -6 ; 10
    6. Freedom, Charles Robertson, Guilford, CT, USA – 5 -5 ; 10
    7. Defender, Dick Enerson, San Rafael, CA, USA – 7 -7 ; 14
    8. Lionheart, Harry Graves, Grand Isle, VT, USA – 8 -8 ; 16

    12mR – Traditional (3 Boats)
    1. American Eagle, Eagle 2019 Syndicate, Middletown, RI, USA – 2 -1 ; 3
    2. Columbia, Kevin Hegarty / Anthony Chiurco, Newport, RI, USA – 1 -2 ; 3
    3. Nefertiti, Jon Sears Wullschleger, Sarasota, FL, USA – 3 -3 ; 6

    12mR – Vintage (4 Boats)
    1. Onawa, Jim Blanusha / Steven Gewirz / Louis Girard / Earl McMillen / Mark Watson, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -1 ; 3
    2. Nyala, Mauro Pelaschier / Patrizio Bertelli, Arezzo, ITA – 1 -2 ; 3
    3. Blue Marlin, Henrik Andersin, Kauniainen, Uusimaa, FIN – 3 -3 ; 6
    4. Vema III, Johan Troye, Oslo, Norway, NOR – 4 -4 ; 8

    12mR- Spirit (2 Boats)
    1. America II, Michael Fortenbaugh, Jersey City, NJ, USA – 1 -2 ; 3
    2. America II, Scott Curtis, New York, NY, USA – 3 -1 ; 4

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    It Ain't Easy On The Upper Bay




    NEWPORT, R.I. (July 11, 2019) – Two races in 11-14 knot breezes today proved that winning will be no easy task at the 2019 12 Metre World Championship hosted by Ida Lewis Yacht Club and organized by the International Twelve Metre Association’s (ITMA) Americas Fleet. Champions will be crowned in five divisions on Saturday after the completion of a nine-race series (weather permitting) that started on Tuesday in Newport, R.I. The fleet of 21 12 Metres from six nations sailed in the “upper Bay” north of the iconic Pell Bridge instead of “outside” on Rhode Island Sound where it was sailed for the first two days of the regatta.

    The Grand Prix and Modern Divisions both saw extremely close racing that translated into slimmer margins on the scoreboard between first- and second-place positions.

    Enterprise (US-27), helmed by Clay Deutsch of Newport, R.I. won both races in Modern Division to close the gap on leader Challenge XII (KA-10), owned and helmed by Jack LeFort of Jamestown, R.I. “In our morning meeting where we discuss goals for the day, I told our team ‘right now, the regatta is not half over, but tonight it will be more than half over, so we’ve got to scoop up some points,’” said Deutsch after racing. “We talked about how to sail the boat finer. We didn’t have enough coordination between the helm and the crew on main and jib, so we really worked on that today. It’s also amazing how your sailing IQ goes up when there’s flat water and breeze!”


    all images © Ian Roman/12MWorlds







    Deutsch, who chartered Enterprise from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Sailing Foundation and whose team has not had as much time in the boat as LeFort’s, called Challenge XII the gold-standard boat. “We’re very much alive and still in it, but they are still in the driver’s seat.”

    LeFort described Challenge XII finishing almost overlapped with Enterprise in the first race and how it wound up fourth in the second race. “We were approaching the first weather mark together with Enterprise when our jib sheet got caught in the traveler winch,” he said. “We had to take the top off the winch and by then everyone was gone.” Once its spinnaker was flying, Challenge XII fought its way back up through the fleet. It has a four-point lead over Enterprise, which is tied on point score with Courageous (US-26), which is in third overall.

    It was also moving day for Maggie and Gunther Buerman’s New Zealand (KZ-3) which posted a 1-2 today in the Grand Prix Division with Brad Read and Lexi Gahagan co-skippering. That closed the scoring gap to one point with Danish leader Legacy (KZ-5), which finished 3-3 today and was skippered by Thomas Andersen, with Jesper Bank calling tactics.

    “We’ve been going well, but we weren’t getting the first shift off the line the last two days,” said Read, who also calls tactics on New Zealand. “The good news is we don’t think we’ve done our best sailing yet on KZ-3.”








    Also in the Grand Prix Division, Kookaburra II (KA-12), a second entry owned and skippered by Patrizio Bertelli with Brazil’s Torben Grael on the helm, lost its outhaul in the first race and came back to finish second, then won the second race and currently sits in third overall.

    Meanwhile, in the Traditional Division Columbia (US-16), helmed by Kevin Hegarty of Newport, R.I. and skippered by Anthony Chiurco of Princeton, N.J. posted finishes of 3-1 today to hold a two-point lead over American Eagle (US-21), sailed by the Eagle 2019 Syndicate, which finished 2-3. Nefertiti (US-19), owned and skippered by Jon Sears Wullschleger of Sarasota, Fla., had the best showing of the day, winning the first race and taking second in race two for a third overall.

    Nyala (US-12), owned by Italy’s Patrizio Bertelli and skippered by Mauro Pelaschier won both of its races to dominate the Vintage Division. It holds a seven-point lead over Onawa (US-6), which is being sailed by Jim Blanusha, Steven Gewirz, Louis Girard, Earl McMillen, and Mark Watson of Newport, R.I. Onawa finished 2-4 today.

    In the Spirit Division, America II (US-42), helmed by Scott Curtis of New York, N.Y. is now ahead on a tiebreaker with America II (US-46), helmed by Michael Fortenbaugh of Jersey City, N.J.

    Last night’s “Nordic Night,” an informal gathering featuring Scandinavian appetizers and aquavit, hosted sailors dockside at Sail Newport’s Sailing Center Headquarters immediately after racing. Tonight is the much-anticipated 12 Metre Dinner Dance at the Marble House, one of the mansions that line Newport’s Bellevue Avenue.

    Racing resumes tomorrow at 11 a.m.








    2019 12 Metre Worlds
    Day Three (July 11)

    12mR – Grand Prix (4 Boats)
    1. Legacy (KZ-5), Thomas Andersen / Jesper Bank, Munkebo, Fyn, Den – 1 -1 -1 -1 -3 -3 ; 10
    2. New Zealand (KZ-3), Gunther & Maggie Buerman, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -2 ; 11
    3. Kookaburra II (KA-12), Torben Grael / Patrizio Bertelli, Arezzo, ITA – 3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -1 ; 15
    4. Kiwi Magic (KZ-7), Johan Blach Petersen, Aarhus C, DEN – 4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 ; 24

    12mR – Modern (8 Boats)
    1. Challenge XII (KA-10), Jack LeFort, Jamestown, RI, USA – 1 -2 -1 -1 -2 -4; 11
    2. Enterprise (US-27), Clayton & Nancy Deutsch, Newport, RI, USA – 3 -4 -3 -3 -1 -1 ; 15
    3. Courageous (US-26), Ralph Isham / Steve Glascock / Alexander Auersperg / Ward Marsh, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -1 -2 -4 -4 -2; 15
    4. Victory ’83 (K-22), Dennis Williams, Hobe Sound, FL, USA – 4 -6 -4 -2 -3 -3 ; 22
    6. Freedom (US-30), Charles Robertson, Guilford, CT, USA – 5 -5 -6 -5 -5 -5 ; 31
    5. Intrepid (US-22), Jack Curtin, Toronto, Ont, CAN – 6 -3 -5 -6 -6 -7; 33
    7. Defender (US-33), Dick Enersen, San Rafael, CA, USA – 7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 ; 41
    8. Lionheart (K-18), Harry Graves, Grand Isle, VT, USA – 8 -8 -8 -8 -8 -8 ; 50

    12mR – Traditional (4 Boats)
    1. Columbia (US-16), Kevin Hegarty / Anthony Chiurco , Newport, RI, USA – 1 -2 -2 -1 -3 -1 ; 10
    2. American Eagle (US-21), Eagle 2019 Syndicate , Middletown, RI, USA – 2 -1 -1 -3 -2 -3 ; 12
    3. Nefertiti (US-19), Jon Sears Wullschleger , Sarasota, FL, USA – 3 -3 -3 -2 -1 -2 ; 14
    4. Easterner (US-18), Scott Bernard , Annapolis, MD, USA – 5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 ; 30

    12mR – Vintage (4 Boats)
    1. Nyala (US-12), Mauro Pelaschier / Patrizio Bertell , Arezzo, ITA – 1 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 ; 7
    2. Onawa (US-6), Jim Blanusha / Steven Gewirz / Louis Girard / Earl McMillen / Mark Watson, Newport, RI, USA – 2 -1 -3 -2 -2 -4 ; 14
    3. Blue Marlin (FIN-1), Henrik Andersin, Kauniainen, Uusimaa, FIN – 3 -3 -2 -3 -3 -2 ; 16
    4. Vema III (N-11), Johan Troye, Oslo, Norway, NOR – 4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 ; 23

    12mR- Spirit (2 Boats)
    1. America II (US-42), Scott Curtis, New York, NY, USA – 3 -1 -2 -1 -2 -3 ; 11
    2. America II (US-46), Michael Fortenbaugh, Jersey City, NJ, USA – 1 -2 -1 -2 -1 -3 ; 11

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