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Thread: 2019 Transpac Official Thread

  1. #11
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    July 10 Evening Position Update


    Div 6



    Div 7



    Div 8



    Div 9



    Div10



    Div 6-10

    TRACKER




    AIS
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  2. #12
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    Transpac July 11th 10:00 PDST Update




    Thursday 0800 Report

    July 11, 2019

    Seas lumpy 5-6’. 7/8 overcast. Wind 310-320@17-20kt. Baro 1020mb. Great start. Sun, smiles, fair winds. Cleared Catalina however and the cocktails got stowed pretty quickly. Hard, wet, queasy reaching all night and for what appears to be the next couple of days as well. The cabin of a Hobie 33 in these conditions looks as you would expect it to look. Still some dry spots but you need to be strategic. No one much felt like eating the pancake breakfast with fresh strawberries and maple syrup that I packed us back in LA! Maybe because it was discovered in the bilge under a sailbag. Right, time for a sail change. Till tomorrow.

    ********************************

    The dig south is well established. Fleet has hit better breeze and lead boats are in the 11.5 knot boats speed range and trailing boats
    including the Hobie 33's are in the 8.0 Knot range







    0600 Tracker position



    1000 AIS Position
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  3. #13
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    (Note: all info disseminated from the 4 hour delayed chart info provided)





    In Division 6, 11 boats have reached a more consistent breeze, with Cecil and Alyson Rossi's Farr 57' Ho okolohe
    currently leading the mono and overall Line Honors doing 10.4 knots with 137nm under their belts, yet are corrected out by
    Scot Grealish's J-121 Blue Flash, with 122nm sailed. Currently 3rd in division, Joe Markee' Swede 50' Ohana making 8.9 knots with 118 sailed.








    Division 7 features the crowd favorite the 67' S&S Yawl Chubasco out front making an even 10 knots with 121 sailed thus far.
    Michael Yokell's luxurious Oyster 56' Quester is 2nd in division making 9.1 knots and 116 nm completed.
    3rd in division, Mike Sudo's Beneteau First 47.7 Macondo, easing along at 8.6 knots with 116 sailed.







    In the 5 boat Division 3, Dean Treadway's Farr 36 Sweet Okole leads with 108 nm completed and is going 7.9 knots
    David Gorney's J105 No Compromise is a tad further north than the others and lays in 2nd, making 7.5 knots with 107 under the keel.
    Kyle Vanderspek's Hobie 33' Aloha retains 3rd in division. doing 7.6knots with 105nm done. Her sister ships Dark Star and Mayhem are both
    digging south and sailing a longer route at higher speed, so we'll see what shakes out...







    The 4 boat Division 9 is led by Christian Doegl's Swan 461 Free, chugging along at 8.7 knots and 117nm behind her transom.
    Ian Ferguson's Wasa 55 Nadelos holds on to 2nd, making 8.1 knots and 107 nm in the rear view mirror.
    Russ Johnson's Jeanneau 52.2' Blue Moon is in 3rd, with 8.3 knots and 106 nm gone by.






    The Cal 40 Division has broken into 3 parts with Highlander to the north and Nalu V to the south.
    Donal Jesberg's Viva leads, white 8.7 knots of speed and having burned through 113 nm.
    Rodney Pimentel's Azure in 2nd with 7.8 knots and 109 nm consumed.
    The Eddy Family's Callisto currently resides in 3rd, making 7.8 knots with 102 nm gone by.
    The Cal 40's are 1st, 2nd,3rd and 4th in ORR ...
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  4. #14
    Maybe a Cal 40 podium sweep?

  5. #15
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    A Quick heads up.

    Hobie 33 Mayhem has rudder problems and is retiring.

    Cal 40 Nalu has water ingress issues and has retired.

    Hobie 33 Aloha Retires due to rudder post damage.




    The Hobie 33 is one of the most difficult rudder we build. Originally designed to be installed on the trailer. The rudder shaft separates, via a stainless casting and a long threaded rod. Additionally the rudder head is another Hobie casting that splices into the upper shaft. All of which are aging out. None of these castings are available. An added bonus is the upper and lower are different dimensions, making a solid continuous shaft challenging.

    Steve Brown
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  6. #16
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Things have been a bit difficult on Celestra. First my steak was over done after I specifically asked for medium rare, and then our projector bulb went out. So much for movie night (and people said it would be easy on a cruising catamaran).

    Over all the sailing is good, with a consistent 15-18kts true wind with 3-4ft waves. However, we all wish we knew what to do with these large white clothes flapping in the wind.
    The thing that makes this somewhat bearable is ice cream sandwiches and the fact that we are crossing an ocean as part of the Transpac ��

    Thank you for putting on such a great event.

    Cruising Cat Celestra


    ***********************************

    It's day 2 and we are hauling mail. The crisp new jet black carbon fiber sail is pulling like a freight train; even reefed. The tunes are cranking and Jake just yelled 10.4 kts from the helm. We passed two boats in the last 24 hours and the crew is happy and looking for speed. As the sun sets on the second day, the wind is building, temps dropping and things (A.K.A the crew) are looking forward to getting wet with some sporty driving. All agree, this is where the action is and would be nowhere else.

    Tropic Thunder

    *************************************

    Yesterday the clock struck noon and Macondarella's journey to the ball begun.

    But this isn't just any ball. This is no glass slipper, polite society, champagne waltz kinda shindig.
    No, this is Maconadrella's foray outside her comfort zone, loos'd of limits and imaginary lines—this is her epic journey to finally get lei'd. We'll be chronicling her journey and of her faithful crew in regular posts, dependant upon sea state and vomit threat level.


    Macondo

    ***********************************
    This is a tough one to post. At 21:00 PT Team Aloha has Retired from Transpac. Our rudder post just cracked and we are turned around and heading back towards San Diego. We are currently 250 miles from the Mission Bay breakwater with a bearing back to Mission Bay of 54 degrees, our position is 31* 02.6N, 121* 42.9 W. Current speed is about 3 and a half knots with just the genoa staysail up.
    I should also say that we are all safe and fine albeit very bummed. Thank you to everyone who supported and believed in us. And don’t worry the Mighty Aloha will be back on the startling line soon. -Aloha #hobie33 #teamaloha33 #transpac50



    Update from Aloha

    Retiring from the 2019 Transpac is nothing short of the biggest heartbreak of our lives, or at least that’s the way it feels right now. Watching the fleet sail by us as we sail home at 3.5 knots is painful, but we couldn’t be more happy for our competitors as they sail on to greatness in Hawaii. At the finish of our 2018 Pacific Cup Craig Leweck posted on Scuttlebutt Sailing an article about us titled “Attitude overcomes all Hurdles” that statement has stuck with us since our finish last year and still stands true today. Although this is not the outcome we planned and prepared over a year for, this is the outcome we are faced with and as a successful team we are tasked with making the best of a painful situation. We have to remember the positives here and the biggest one is everyone is safe and we are getting a smile here and there onboard.

    There is also a bigger take away from this, the community of sailors and non sailors that have and continue to support us. Its hard to find a different sport that brings together people of such very different backgrounds and walks of life all interested and invested in the success of all the sailors on the starting line. After our email went out about retiring at 2100 last night we received word that the MV Happy Days would be in route to our position at day break no questions asked no hesitation just Bob, Karen, Heidi and Kyle Blair dropping their weekend plans at a moments notice to go on a rescue mission 250 miles offshore for us, what other sport in the world can you find people like that. A selfless act of kindness and one which instantly raised our morale and spirits.

    The gratefulness we have in reading the positive comments of encouragement and the support of The Blair’s, our Parents, and Families, and our sailing community is unmatched. The last time the Happy Days towed us in, no pun intended, was a much happier day as we sailed across the finish line of the 2019 Cabo Race and although we won’t be finishing this Transpac race you can all imagine we will have the same smiles when we see her big beautiful hull with our family waving coming over the horizon some 200 miles offshore. So again like Craig said “Attitude overcomes all hurdles” and this moment will be no different. Thank you again for all your support and encouraging kind words. We will keep you posted as we hook up the tow and head in. Happy Days ETA To our position is 04:00 on the 13th. -Aloha
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  7. #17
    Well the Hobie 33 podium sweep is out the window, but there are still 5 Cal 40's in the hunt!

  8. #18
    Bummer, but better 1 day out than 5!

  9. #19
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Maserati In The Starting Blocks




    July 12th, 2019

    The 50th edition of the Transpacific Yacht Race starts tomorrow (The Big Fellas)

    Maserati Multi 70 and Giovanni Soldini are ready for the challenge with Argo and PowerPlay



    The 50th edition of the Transpacific Yacht Race (Transpac) starts tomorrow, Saturday July 13th at 12.30 local time (19.30 UTC, 21.30 Italian time). Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi 70’s Team will set sail from Pt. Fermin, Los Angeles and head towards the finish line, 2225 miles ahead, off Diamond Head, Honolulu, Hawaii.



    The weather forecast shows typical conditions for this time of the year: «The first hours after the start will be the hardest» Giovanni Soldini explains, «there will be a wind hole but we will try to make our stand. Later, for around twelve hours, we will sail broad reach with a nice 20-25 wind. After that the wind will start to get lighter and turn to tailwind. We will have to try to stay in the best wind possible and, at the same time, sail around the high pressure. We're ready for the challenge, Maserati Multi 70 is in good shape and we’re excited!»



    Aboard Maserati Multi 70, skipper Giovanni Soldini will be joined by 6 professional sailors: the Italians Alberto Bona, Guido Broggi and Matteo Soldini; the Spanish Carlos Hernandez Robayna and Oliver Herrera Perez; the French François Robert.



    Among the six multihulls participating in the race, Maserati Multi 70, sailing in flying mode, will compete with the two MOD 70s already challenged many times: American Argo, skippered by Jason Carroll and English PowerPlay, skippered by Peter Cunningham. The two rival trimarans will sail in classic mode, even though Argo is working to develop a flying system and will race with flying rudders.



    In addition to beating the multihull record, set in 2017 by the American ORMA 60 Mighty Merloe (4 days, 6 hours, 32 minutes and 30 seconds), the Italian trimaran and its competitors will race for the Rudy Choi Perpetual Trophy, awarded for the fastest multihull elapsed time.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  10. #20
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    July 12 Position Update

    As we near the 48 hours of racing, we look where we currently stand as well as future forecasts.
    The Wednesday starters have benefited from decent winds pushing them towards Mai Tai Landia with the
    exception of 2 Hobie 33's and one Cal 40 which have been forced to retire.

    In Division 6 The Farr 57' Ho okolohe Leads the division AND Line Honors AND Monhull Line Honors at the moment.
    Ho okolohe had sailed 397 nm with 1888 to go at this report 0400 HST and were just getting in to a section of lighter air, and hull speed has begun to drop.
    Tim Jones' Olson 40' Live Wire has sailed a more direct line and is in 2nd with 337nm sailed thus far and 1918 left
    Michael Gebb's Pacer 42' Zimmer currently sits in 3rd with 1911 remaining. All boats in division have seen hull speed by several knots and will have to endure
    another 24 to 48 hours of mid to low teen weather before accelerating again.




    In Division 7 Michael Yokell's Oyster 56' Quester has liberated the class crown for the time being.
    They are 1915nm from the finish with 357 nm sailed and are seeing a temporary reduction in sailboat fuel.
    Mike Sudo's Beneteau First 47.7 Macondo is in 2nd with 1911 to go and 351 done.
    The Chuby Syndicate is furthest south and may pick up or stay in better pressure over the impending light spell,
    they are 1 mile further away than Macondo but should accelerate soon




    As mentioned earlier, two Hobie 33's have retired from Division 8, Kyle Vanderspek's Aloha
    and Steven Elder's Mayhem, bothe with rudder issues. Which if not previously addressed, mus be making their crew
    on Dark Star a nervous wreck. The surprise leader, David Gorney's J-105 No Compromise is the northernmost boat
    of the 3 remaining, yet is expected to get less pressure than Sweet Okole (2nd) and Dark Star (3rd)





    Suddenly, Division 9 has more boats than Division 8! Ian Ferguson's Wasa 55' Nadelos is their leader
    with Christian Doegl's Swan 461 Free in 2nd and Russ Johnson's Jeanneau 52' Blue Moon in 3rd.
    With 1929, 1915 and 1934 nm to go respectively it's anyone's race, and they might be in a a sweet spot to keep the
    better pressure than the boats ahead over the weekend.




    The Mighty Cal 40's find themselves down a boat after Mark Ashmore's Nalu experienced water ingress that was
    faster than the pump could handle, but they were well on the way towards SoCal last report.
    Don Jesberg Viva is division leader with a 5 mile lead over the Eddy Family's Callisto, which checks in with 1930 to go
    and Steve Calhoun's Psyche is 3 mile aft of them in 3rd, with Rodney Pimentel's Azure just 1 mile off the pace.
    The Cal 40's have also been experiencing wind reduction, but alas they all are 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th on ORR overall at moment
    and are also in good position to keep a steady progress through the impending light patch. We will visit that in our next post...stay tuned...





    http://yb.tl/transpac2019#
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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