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Thread: 2019 Transpac Official Thread

  1. #31
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Breaking News: OEX Crew Abandon's Ship, Maserati




    FLASH NEWS – July 15th, 2019



    Maserati Multi 70 collided with a big floating object during the Transpac

    Left side hull’s bow and rudder’s wing are damaged



    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi 70, at 4.30 UTC on Monday July 15th, while sailing at 23-24 knots, collided with a big floating object that damaged the left side hull's bow and the rudder's wing.



    Giovanni Soldini explained: «We couldn't understand what it was, but it was very big, at least one meter high out of the water. It hit the left side hull with great force, severely damaging it, then it glided along the hull and hit the rudder. The fuse system worked, but the object was so big that we lost the outer half of the wing. We had to stop for one hour: we took off the wing completely so we could use the rudder's blade. Now we're sailing with the bow out of the water using the foil: we're waiting for the light to arrive to do a thorough inspection of the side hull - which has 7 watertight bulkheads - to check if there are any holes».

    Maserati Multi 70’s Team and their competitors, MOD 70s Argo and PowerPlay and the trimaran Paradox, set sail from Los Angeles on Saturday July 13th at 12.30 local time (19.30 UTC, 21.30 Italian time) for the 50th edition of the Transpac. In an attempt to sail around the low pressure bubble of light wind, Maserati Multi 70 opted for a northern route, but the conditions expected according to the models occurred a few hours late and the Italian trimaran was delayed.

    According to the positions updated at 4.00 UTC, Argo was sailing in first place at 26 knots, 1680 miles from the finish line in Honolulu, followed 100 miles behind by PowerPlay, sailing at 27 knots. Maserati Multi 70 was following at 27 knots, with 1822 miles to go.


    *****************************





    "The OEX crew experienced rudder issues and had to abandon ship. Pyewacket has picked the crew up and they are all on their way back to the mainland. Most importantly, ALL ARE SAFE. Needless to say, we are incredibly appreciative to Roy Disney and the crew of Pyewacket. We are devastated about the loss of our wonderful OEX. Will post when I have more information. Everyone is still in shock."







    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  2. #32
    Man o man, things getting rough and not even rough conditions yet!

  3. #33
    Crappy way to start your work week!

  4. #34
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Notes From Boats July 15th

    Bretwalda 3 Day 3 Race Updates
    July 14, 2019, 1830

    The Bretwalda team had a great start and trip to the west end of Catalina. Good Call crossed us just before we cleared the point at the west end without having to tack from the start. Many in our fleet tacked up right after the start and that became lost distance to us. Once we cleared the end of the island it was light for a few hours then we got into the breeze. It became very choppy and with winds in the 20's. It was sloppy and the boat was on it's side making the general task of eating, dressing or any other life skills extremely difficult.

    The start of day 2 we decide to go to a Code0, this made the boat plane faster but we were on the edge of disaster for the next 20 hours with a reef, 0, and jib all up. The closer we sailed to the edge the better we did on the fleet. We are now into Day 3 and flying a Code A2.

    We had one scare with the charging. Our usual charging RPM was causing the batteries to turn off. Jay played around and finally go the to start charging. Since we make our own water it was a bad situation. We do dehydrated food for the most part, guys are trading their portions of some of the flavors for others already. Everyone is doing great and pressing hard.

    *************************************

    Katara Day 2 Race Update
    July 14, 2019
    Position: 29 14.7N 125 32.2W
    Speed: 9-11 kts
    Distance to go: 1,813 nm
    Weather: Sunny with clouds, winds 000-020 @ 12-16 kts
    Sail Package: Full Main, A4 Spinnaker

    Hey Everyone,

    It's been a very pleasant and productive trip aboard KATARA today. At about 10:20 PDT this morning we made the decision to peel from our A3 reaching kite to our downwind runner A4 kite. As always, Michael and the rest of the bow team rocked the peel, and the aft team juggled it nicely as well.

    We're currently still the most northern boat in our division which is causing me some small amount of angst as I continually monitor weather in hopes of a reassurance that we haven't positioned ourselves too close to the Pacific High and set ourselves up to run out of pressure. According to everything I can see we're in a good spot, but time will tell. I suppose on this one we will look like all starts or chumps.

    Now that our Runner is up it's likely we will stay on this board with this kite up for the next 5 days or so as we work around way west being slung shot around the High in the “slot cars” portion of the race. In about 185 miles we'll be in a position where we're locked in to a track that costs very significantly to deviate from.

    Everyone on board seems in good spirits. Cat, Sam, and Liam are asleep now, preparing to take over at 1800PDT while the current on-watch team is taking turns driving and trimming the kite or trying to get a little extra sleep on the rail on top of the “stack pack” of sails we have piled on the weather side. Looks like Bill is driving at the moment - he's doing plenty of grinning from where I can see him - must be having a good go of it.

    So far all systems are a go, and the water maker has been chugging right along producing good clear clean water for our needs. The new battery management plan seems to be going very well, as we're only charging about twice a day for a little over an hour, a massive improvement from our previous configuration.

    We all hope everyone ashore is having a nice productive weekend and that you continue to enjoy following along with us.

    ************************
    Getting to know Captain Ian Ferguson
    July 14, 2019
    Today we have been lucky to have a chat with our busy captain. Definitely not a rookie in sailing, but first time on Transpac.

    1. Please tell a little bit about yourself:

    I am 29 years old and grew up in Orinda, CA. Social status: figuring it out haha. I currently work for Elvstrøm sails as the Bay area sailpoint/ West Coast Rep and Hansen’s Rigging. I enjoy both of them greatly and couldn’t be happier with this decision to working in the boating community.

    2. You have got several boats, what types and when do you sail them

    The main boats I own: Lido 14, Flying Dutchmans. The collection grows and shrinks as needed (is there ever a thing as owning too many boats?) I mostly sail the Lido with my family and very close friends on a San Pablo Dam (a lake in my home town). I learned to sail the Lido with my father and younger brother. It is still my favorite boat to sail due to all of the memories associated with it. The Flying Dutchman came about due to my skipper Zhenya on the Melges 24 taking me out on his FD. I was hooked from then on out and ended up buying one (despite Zhenya repeatedly telling me not to). I sail the FD weekly with friends in the south SF Bay and have many great laughs and learning experiences. This boat has helped me become the sailor I am today.

    3. What is your best sailing moment?

    This is a difficult one. Almost all of the times I go sailing are great moments. I like sharing the time with my friends and family. It brings the people around me together.
    The most difficult sailing moment was actually a couple of days ago in fluky conditions in the middle of the Pacific!

    4. Nådeløs is a Wasa 55. What made you decide to buy this boat?

    A few reasons: 1) the week before meeting Karl Otto and Maren, I was shopping around for a boat that met a few criteria: live aboard, ocean going, can be raced. I checked out several other boats but there was always an issue or two that made me reluctant. Too pricey, too beat up, not a good layout, not the right feel or vibe you could say. I narrowed my list down to 3 possibilities. The day I saw the Wasa for the first time was when I was sailing with my Uncle and Veronika (current TransPac crew) in a race. When we arrived at Encinal Yacht Club, there was the Wasa. Rodney told me I had to go take a good look at the boat and meet Karl and Maren. When they mentioned that she was looking for a new owner and the price range, the rest was history. It feels like fate that I met Karl and Maren and their Cubaneren. I see this friendship lasting for a long time.


    5. Nådeløs is a Norwegian word and would directly translated mean Reckless or no mercy. How come you have chosen this name?
    It started with wanting to keep the theme of the boat since it is unlike anything else I had ever sailed on or seen for that matter. Since the boat is from Norway, I decided to honor this. I pulled up Google translate and started typing in names that I liked. Nådeløs popped up when I typed in Relentless and it stuck. My favorite boat growing up was 20,000 leagues under the sea and the Submarine was named Nautilus and her skipper Nemo was relentless and ruthless. Some may say I am a little reckless and maybe ruthless from time to time.

    6. Probably the youngest skipper in this edition of the TransPac. Has that been a driving force in all the preparations that must be done to come to the starting line?

    My age didn’t have much to do with it. It was more to fulfill a dream I had to sail the world (a few remember when all this came about). The Transpac I feel is just a jumping off point for what is to come. Preparing for this race has been nothing short of extremely difficult. For the past year, I would go to work for 8 hours and then come back home (the boat) and then spend the rest of the evening working on all of the little details to get the Wasa to the point that I wanted her to be in. The Category 1 offshore race boat standards is a long list safety checks that had to be met to be able to compete in this race. I had friends and family cheering me on and sometimes alerted me to some harsh realities that I was dealing with. I would like to thank my Uncle George and Aunt Kim for really lighting my fire in the final 3 weeks to pulling everything together. It feels like a miracle that I made it to the startline.

    7. Could you ever have found a better crew for this race? (Yeah, not very journalistic, but yes will work)

    I really don’t think so. After these 4 days at sea, the knowledge and skill of everyone on board has been priceless. Karl and Maren probably know the Wasa 55 better than anyone else and Veronika with her sail trim and fine attention to detail makes this easier on my role as Captain and person in charge. It was weird having the boat pulled out of the slip a few of the times with me below deck working on last minute details. I am sleeping well during my off shifts knowing the boat is in great hands.

    8. A bit over 1/3 of the race is done. Has it been as expected so far and where will it end?

    I honestly didn’t fully know what to expect, I entered into one of the most prestigious offshore races in the world without ever completing an ocean passage, only coastal races on others boats. I was extremely nervous in the moments leading up to leaving the dock. So far, the boat and crew is performing beautifully and I couldn’t be happier. The chart plotter says we are 1445nm from Hawaii and I am optimistic with the outcome!

    Back with the crew again, and just so we have said it; Ian tried to extinct us yesterday when he grabbed his foredeck dressing (the swimsuit) that had been sitting around in the bathroom dripping wet since the start. Earlier on the blog we had some complaints about smell from the toilet since we could not fill it with water. This shorts have most likely not been totally innocent either. When it got in motion it took out most of the living life that came in its way.


    *****************************

    Hamachi - Light Air Sunday
    July 14, 2019, 1700

    After solid 10-20 for the first 40 hours it got light this morning. Hamachi switched to its A2.5 at the 4am watch shift and worked south/southwest in 10 kts most of the day. The lighter air and flat seas allowed us to do some much needed house keeping, which included going up the rig and doing a check as well as configuring halyards. We flew the drone for the first time and captured these pictures of the boat and crew with Matt Pistay aloft. A general funk has permeated the boat and its been traced to many damp socks and gear. It's now 5pm and the skies are clearing and the wind is filling.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  5. #35
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    Maserati Pushes On

    Just in from Maserati which forwarded images of damages sustained in last nights collision.
    They are apparently continuing toward Hawaii, at a more modest pace.


    MaseratiMulti70’s damaged bow and rudder’s wing on the left side hull.
    The damages were cause by the impact with a big floating object that happened last night.
    The fuse system worked and the rudder’s blade and fitting are in use, but because of the damages we have to sail at a lower speed on this side.











    Last edited by Photoboy; 07-15-2019 at 03:29 PM.
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  6. #36
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    July 15 Position Updates

    We have compression and commingling between fleets now as Friday's starters are beginning to
    catch up to the Wednesday starters and some of the Saturday maxi's and Multi's are just blowing right through.
    More attrition as two sled crews are headed back to mainland on Pyewacket, which took on the refugees
    on OEX as you no doubt by now have heard. The wind hole that held most of Saturdays starters off Catalina
    is no just a bad memories and the entire fleet is enjoying water moving under their keels....



    A quick look see at the elite boats of Divisions 1 and 2 show the rapid pace the Mod 70's , and 100's have made in short time.
    Quinten Stewart's Infiniti 46' Maverick is 3rd corrected in division 1, but it way to early to assume anything except
    the race is wide open after the restart.




    Team Yabsley / Compton's Taxi Dancer is the current de facto leader of the sleds, having put up some impressive 24 hour vmg
    all things considered, however with Trevor Baylis and Hogan Beatie and Malcom Park, it's no surprise. And with OEX and Pyewacket
    no longer in the mix, the door is wide open for some fresh podium blood to emerge. Bill Merlin's Merlin is taking a big dive south, so
    they might take pole position soon.




    Division 3 remains under Bob Pethick's Roger 46' Bretwalda 3's leadership with 2 J-125's in hot pursuit,
    Shawn Dougherty / Jason Andrews's Hamachi and Zachery Anderson / Chris Kramer Velvet Hammer have
    now assumed 2nd and 3rd. But this division will be a dog fight the entire way.





    Division 4, aka the SC 50-52's is also a tightly contested group which will more than likely go down to the wire.
    Scott Deardorff/ Bill Guilfoyle's Prevail has current edge, but it isn't much over Robert Zellmer's Flyingfiche II
    or Dave MacEwan's Lucky Duck. Expect bundle of lead/position changes as this group progresses west.




    Apparently, Patrick Broughton's Kialoa still has winning pulsing through her veins and the old Jim Kilroy steed
    loves the downhill sleigh ride as she was designed for. She had assume 1st with Tom Barker's 60' Swan Good Call
    now in 2nd and Lowell Potiker's Hylas 70' Runaway remaining in 3rd in Division 5. The Cal 40's are spreading out a bit,
    Don Jesberg's Viva remains in the lead, with Rodney Pimentel's Azure in 2nd and the Eddy Family's Callisto in 3rd.
    Overall Corrected is a Cal 40 sweep at this point with Viva leading, Azure in 2nd, Callisto in 3rd and Psyche in 4th





    A slight changeup in Division 6 sees Scott Grealish's J-121 Blue Flash the new leader,
    Cecil & Alyson Rossi's Farr 57' Ho okolohe 40 minutes or so behind in corrected and
    Joe Markee's 50 Swede currently in 3rd, 28 minutes further back corrected.




    Division 7 remains Chubasco's domain, with Michael Yokell's Oyster 56' Quester in 2nd
    and Paul Stemler's J-44 Patriot in 3rd. Maybe it's time for the crew of Isla to pop the Raptor
    chute and give the Warrior fans on Chubby some kitemares?






    Division's 8 & 9 are sailing side by side quite nicely and it makes you wonder why they were not
    melded into one group from the start. Dean Treadway's Sweet Okole remains leader of Div 8
    with David Gorney' J-105 No Compromise about 10 hours behind on corrected and
    Christopher Lemke / Brad Lawson's Hobie 33' Dark Star in 3rd. Ian Ferguson's Wasa 55' Nadelos
    has a 6 hour corrected lead over Christian Doegl's Swan 461 Free, which in turn has a 16 minute lead over
    Russ Johnson's Jeaneau 52.2 Blue Moon for 3rd
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



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  7. #37
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Notes From Boats July 15 Volume 2

    Day 3 Morning Check In
    July 15, 2019, 0800

    The Frenchman aboard was angered by the lack of Bastille Day celebrations on the mighty Argo. He has locked himself in the aft cabin with a bottle of Malbec and the staysail sheets. The Brits are still not talking to the Americans after our tea dumping incident on Saturday evening. The Americans are okay with this.

    *****************************************

    Paradox Race Day 3 Updates
    July 15, 2019, 0800

    Amazing to get out of the hole yesterday evening. Gutted to get sucked in but that's how it goes a. Last race we had nukin winds this one nada for the start. One extreme to another… drifting backwards at 1kt to 30kts reaching in flat water and full moon. What a great section of the race! A little damp but the boat loves being lent on hard.

    Now into glamour champagne sailing downwind with genak and staysail at 18-23kts. The full moon surfing downwind is superb! Spirits are high, water is warm and showers on deck about to commence

    Thanks to our shore crew arthur for the amazing fresh cooked grub, its going down a absolute treat.

    ************************************************** *


    Race Day 5 Morning Report
    July 15, 2019, 0800

    Helmsman attacked at zero dark thirty by unknown airborne assailant. Sucker punched in back of head.

    WANTED: Large flying fish. Approximately 13” in length, 2.5” in diameter. With “huge fighter-jet wings”. Last seen flopping off the transom into the sea. Do not attempt to approach.

    **************************************

    July 15, 2019, 0800

    Patience paid off, blast reaching since we broke into the synoptic breeze feeling good as we charge along the route. Had some fun with the Navy life firing demonstration yesterday. Had to commence negotiations with them at 0800hrs on the 14th as the commanded us to deviate from our 230 degree course to due south 180 degrees for 35 nautical miles. Once we explained to them what we were up to, and noted another 20 boats were following a similar line they agreed to allow us to steer 200 degrees… a great result given the alternative… Hope everyone is having a great race, next 24-48 hrs tweaking the slot will be interesting.

    All the best. Mike Team Maverick

    ************************************
    Team Tropic Thunder

    Day 6 Morning Update
    July 15, 2019, 0800

    Crew looking for 1/2 way . . . somewhat annoyed by the “are we there yet” questions. Working on creative answers like “we're 10 nm closer than the last time you asked” . . . not to the “If you don't settle down I'm going to turn this boat around” stage. Planning a scavenger hunt for the “International Date Line”; sadly, they're too smart for that joke.

    Running too high . . . Dive, dive, dive. A little early to drop to South, but the Eastern High (weakish) is creeping down over our route; actually sitting it's fat butt on our route.

    *********************************

    FlyingFiche II Race Day 3 Updates
    July 14, 2019

    The forecast said that Friday would provide strong starting conditions, and it delivered. The wind filled in just before the start and it hasn't gone away. We hit the west end of Catalina in about three hours and made enough distance from shore so that the wind didn't shut off with the sunset. The first night had very steady 21-22 knot breezes in which we were tight-reaching with No. 3 jib and reefed main. Driving the boat was very easy and we were making 13 knots. The moon was out for a while but we went under a thick cloud. … In the dark it seemed like we were moving even faster—it felt like driving a truck down the highway.

    Sailing was easy but the seas were confused and lumpy, and the boat was on its side, so gear was wet, stomachs were sour but spirits were high.

    Bob cooked up tacos—hot food never tasted so good.

    Saturday had the sun only peek out a few times, otherwise it was gray horizon to horizon. We switched to the jib top and the ride got a little more comfortable. We chased a mast light all night, and at sunup it looked like we made up some good ground. We put up our first spinnaker at the 2 a.m. watch change; the seas flattened out and the ride became much more comfortable.

    Sunday started cold and mostly cloudy, but it turned into the first nice day of the race. The sun was often behind some high puffy clouds, but it lit up the sky and warmed the air. The layers came off and we sailed in shorts and T-shirts. We expect a lot more of this in the days to come. We were able to open up the hatches and dry out the boat and our gear. The rest of the sails are now up on the rail, which opens up more living space. In addition to a big cleanup, we replaced a reef line that had given way.

    Ribs are on the menu for tonight.

    **********************************
    Prevail SC 52

    MONDAY UPDATE
    Team is happy and motivated as Bill Guilfoyle has put us in a great position on the fleet and course. Jon Ziskind is so happy we're worried he's going to explode. Matt Wilson and Gus Duncan are rested up after five sail changes the first night in cold wet challenging conditions. We're settling into A2 conditions and speed driver Phil Perkins is
    setting the pace. Father son team Kent and Lucas Pierce are sharing smiles and sunrise watches. Marcel Tremblay is working the sail selection decisions and was wide eyed when he saw the new A2 for the first time. Me?...I'm enjoying all of it and especially playing outside
    with my friends. The team is pitching in on all aspects of the quest with gusto. Today is dry out day and maybe bucket showers for the hearty ones. We've been enjoying awesome food from Laura, Leslie, Ann-Marie, Jeanene and Shari.
    Mai Tai Dreams...Scott Deardorff

    **************************************

    First two updates received from aboard Bolt!

    #1

    We have finally broken through the painfully light and shifty breeze that we found ourselves in soon after the start until around mid-day Sunday as we passed San Nicolas Island. Morale has definitely improved now that we are actually moving at a somewhat decent pace, and Bud's chicken dinner made everyone feel like winners. We have enjoyed tons of marine life including several pods of porpoise and dolphin, along with the occasional whale sighting. With the increased breeze, we have now switched to our #3 jib. We are seeing wind in the upper teens and expect it to build further overnight.

    #2

    Well, the breeze definitely built! We saw puffs in the low-20s, and had some friendly competition as each driver was trying to break the last's speed record. However, everything became very surreal at around 2:00am as we heard a mayday call on channel 16. Unfortunately OEX, one of the boats in our fleet, was taking on a large amount of water and were unable to make sufficient repairs. At that point, we were about 7 miles away and headed straight at their location. Luckily, Pyewacket was in close proximity to the scene and responded. Our Navigator Alex, then served as a relay between Pyewacket and the Coast Guard during the recovery. Eventually, they were able to pick up the entire crew after the boat was abandoned.

    The Bolt Crew as a whole are saddened that a storied sled such as OEX was lost, but are happy to hear that everyone is safe and headed back to the mainland. It is definitely a bummer that not only one, but two sleds are out of the race.

    For the rest of the night we made good progress and are happy to be out in the breeze. Now we are seeing consistent winds in the 15-18kt range, which certainly keeps us moving at a decent pace as the wind slowly swings behind us. We are all looking forward to popping a chute soon!

    ************************************************** ******


    Monday morning and all is good on Hamachi as the boys keep the pedal to the metal:We have settled into a routine and the bodies are adjusting. We all crash out now when we are off watch. The food has been amazing. Had the enchiladas and daube today. It's taken a few days to work out the navigation routine but David has done an excellent job getting data to Fred and I. The three of us have worked well to develop a tactical and strategic outlook. .
    We seem to have crazy boat speed as we are sailing 10% above our polars and have been able to drop every other J/125 we've come into contact with. This is due, we think, to being really focused on minimizing weight and hull preparation.

    The Port Watch is currently on the dog watch (we rotate every day) sailing under a near full moon and broken clouds scooting along at 10-11 kts in 10-13 kts of wind. Seas are pretty flat but confused every now and then. Feels like Southern Straits. It's a beautiful night and we had dolphins along side for a while.
    The "Old Man" loves the boat. Lucas is loving the experience, and so is the rest of the crew. Fred tells us this has been a gentle sail so far - he expected worse. Matt has been running all over the boat fixing things and doing projects, because he just cant sit still. Shawn is back to his old self and enjoys the driving. It was a little rough for David during the first 48 hours with Shawn down and out - so he had to split his time between sailing and navigating. Since then things have smoothed out and I have been downloading gribs and doing some of the navigation busywork. The boat is super easy to sail so its mostly doublehanded on deck crews with David doing nav and me doing nav / media. Can't believe its already 25% done!!

    Focus tomorrow is to fix our speedo issue and calibrate our instruments to our performance so far so we can get the right route into Oahu. The high is building and we expect 20kt trades the last half of the race.

    Keep On it! Go Team Hamachi!

    **********************************
    Last edited by Photoboy; 07-15-2019 at 02:49 PM.
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  8. #38
    "The Frenchman aboard was angered by the lack of Bastille Day celebrations on the mighty Argo. He has locked himself in the aft cabin with a bottle of Malbec and the staysail sheets. The Brits are still not talking to the Americans after our tea dumping incident on Saturday evening. The Americans are okay with this."


    Argo is fast and have a good sense of humor.

  9. #39
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    Interview with Sangmeister & Disney On OEX Rudder Failure



    Upon their return to Marina del Rey, the skippers of the Santa Cruz 70 OEX (John Sangmeister) and the Andrews 70 Pyewacket (Roy Disney) give an account of what happened in the rescue of the crew upon the sinking of OEX.
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  10. #40
    Answers a lot of questions.

    Good for TPYC getting the interview in the wee hours!

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