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Thread: 30th Anniversary of New England 100 Goes Terribly Wrong

  1. #1
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    30th Anniversary of New England 100 Goes Terribly Wrong




    A 60 year old female competitor aboard a Nacra MKII was involved in a horrible collision with a powerboat while participating in a long distance beach cat race on Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island.


    NEWPORT, R.I. (WJAR) — A 60-year-old woman from Tiverton was killed Sunday when the sailboat she was racing in collided with a powerboat on the water in Narragansett Bay.

    The state Department of Environmental Management identified the woman as Sandra G. Tartaglino.

    The DEM said the crash happened at about 2:45 p.m. near the Jamestown side of the Pell Bridge.

    The woman who died was a participant in the New England 100 Regatta, which is a two-day sailboat race that consists of sailing around small islands in the bay.

    The regatta starts and finishes in Newport. Sunday was the final day.

    Investigators are waiting for an autopsy, reconstruction of the scene, and evaluating witness statements.


    Pictures given to NBC 10 News show crews on the water responding to the fatal accident in which the two-person catamaran sailboat and a powerboat somehow hit one another.

    The 60-year-old woman was found unconscious as a result of the crash and pronounced dead.

    The Coast Guard, the Narragansett Marine Task Force, the DEM along with first responders from Portsmouth, Newport, Warwick and Jamestown were at the scene.

    The medical examiner's office was brought in to determine her official cause of death. The DEM said alcohol did not play a factor in the crash.

    The woman's friends told NBC 10 News that their hearts are broken. They said she was heavily involved in the race and the sailing community.

    The woman's name was not released by police.


    https://turnto10.com/news/local/sour...eaves-one-dead




    New England 100 is a distance race open to two person catamarans with Portsmouth D-PN number lower than 77.6. Classes are F-18, Portsmouth Handicap Spinnaker & Portsmouth Handicap Non-spinnaker. Goal is to sail 20-50 miles each day starting and finishing at Sail Newport in Newport, RI. This race is for sailors that are confident enough with their sailing ability to self rescue as conditions may warrant sailing in extreme conditions without race committee support.

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  2. #2
    So sad to read.

    Condolences to all associated.

  3. #3
    Tragic. A powerboat vs multihull with high closing speeds is seldom won by the multihull.

    RIP Sandra.

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    Investigation Into Sandra Tartaglino Tragedy Nears Completion




    The DEM’s Division of Law Enforcement Marine Unit is responsible for investigating the boat crash that killed Sandra G. Tartaglino, 60, of Tiverton.

    NEWPORT — A decision on whether the driver of the powerboat that collided with a sailboat in Narragansett Bay in August— resulting in one fatality— will face criminal, civil or no charges should be announced in approximately two weeks, according to the chief of the Department of Environment Management’s Division of Law Enforcement.

    “We are in the final stage where the report is generally complete; it’s being reviewed. We review it both with our internal legal [counsel] at DEM [to determine whether to bring civil charges or none at all], and any incident of this type” is also reviewed by Attorney General Peter Neronha’s office to determine whether the state will bring criminal charges, DEM’s Division of Law Enforcement Chief Dean Hoxsie said Tuesday.

    The DEM’s Division of Law Enforcement Marine Unit is responsible for investigating the boat crash that killed Sandra G. Tartaglino, 60, of Tiverton, Hoxsie said.

    “We understand the public thirst for knowledge,” especially in a social media era where information spreads seemingly instantly, Hoxsie said. In a DEM press release in August, the agency said the investigation’s results were pending an autopsy, collision reconstruction and a collection of witness statements.

    “Everyone is pressured or stressed or emotional after an incident of this type and we want them to be able to...we want everyone to have a fair and impartial interview where they’re not pressured...so that we get the most accurate information that they remember having taken place,” Hoxsie said. “We’re not in that rush. Our goal is to get the most accurate information possible [and] develop a set of facts that would lead to a determination as to what happened.”




    He said the progression of the investigation and the time that’s elapsed since the Aug. 11 collision is normal.

    Boating fatalities “absolutely” take high priority, Hoxsie said. But “while this is a major incident that we’re working on, that was mid-summer,” and beaches, campgrounds and DEM officer hands were full. “We have other boating violations, fisheries enforcement...we have a myriad of issues that we look at [but] any amount of staffing that is necessary...is assigned and dedicated to [boating fatalities].”

    The DEM’s Division of Law Enforcement Marine Unit is responsible for investigating the boat crash that killed Sandra G. Tartaglino, 60, of Tiverton, Hoxsie said. The DEM’s Division of Law Enforcement is divided into three units: the Marine Unit, Upland Unit and the Criminal Investigation Unit. A Response Unit is also listed on the DEM website, but Hoxsie said there are currently just three active units due to staffing constraints. There are 32 DEM Division of Law Enforcement officers total when fully-staffed, but the division isn’t currently fully-staffed, Hoxsie said. Sixteen officers are assigned to the Marine Unit.

    “By statute, we are the agency in Rhode island mandated to investigate any boating accident within state waters unless it is a commercial vessel, which would then be investigated by [the] Coast Guard,” Hoxsie said.

    The Marine Unit is further divided into two units: Marine East and Marine West.

    “One of our [Marine East] boat accident re-constructionists is assigned as the primary” officer for the Aug. 11 fatal collision, Hoxsie said. “A majority of that officer’s time since that incident has been dedicated to that investigation.”

    That officer was assisted by another boat accident re-constructionist officer; a few other officers were also utilized during the investigation, Hoxsie added.

    Tartaglino died after a powerboat collided with a catamaran she occupied around 2:45 p.m. on Aug. 11. The collision occurred just north of the Pell Bridge. Tartaglino was competing in the New England 100 regatta, which is organized by the New England chapter of the NACRA Sailing Association. Dozens of people in the sailing community and various maritime organizations expressed their condolences on social media in the wake of Tartaglino’s death, noting her fierce athleticism and kindness.

    The DEM said in an Aug. 11 press release alcohol was not a factor in the crash. “The Narragansett Bay Marine Task Force was activated and the Newport Harbormaster responded first and recovered a 60-year-old woman, unconscious,” the release said. “The woman was later pronounced dead.”

    https://www.newportri.com/news/20191...ted-this-month
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    No Criminal Charges In Death Of Sandra Tartaglino



    Sandra Tartaglino, 60, of Tiverton was killed in a two-vessel accident on Aug. 11.
    article Laura Daman Newport RI.com Laura Daman Newport RI.com

    PROVIDENCE — After an investigation, the Department of Environmental Management determined Frank Teixeira, 75, of Portsmouth, was not speeding nor operating his 28-foot cruiser in reckless disregard for the safety of others during an Aug. 11 crash between a powerboat and a two-person catamaran sailboat near the Newport Pell Bridge. The crash resulted in the death of Sandra G. Tartaglino, 60, of Tiverton.

    DEM is citing Teixeira with four violations of the Coast Guard’s Inland Navigational Rules, according to a press release. DEM will prosecute the case in the Rhode Island Traffic Tribunal and arraignment is set for Nov. 13. The violations include risk of collision, action to avoid a collision, responsibilities between vessels and failure to keep a look-out. Each violation carries a maximum fine of $100, according to the press release.




    Coast Guard rules stipulate sailing vessels have the right-of-way over power-driven vessels, and all vessels should maintain a proper look-out by sight, DEM noted in its press release.
    Environmental Police Officer Kevin Snow and Lt. Daniel White of DEM’s Division of Law Enforcement led the investigation. Four law enforcement officers from three agencies — the Coast Guard, DEM and the Newport Police Department — did not observe any indication of alcohol or drug use, according to the press release. Officers did not see or find any alcohol containers on Teixeira’s boat, named @Last. Investigators found excessive speed was not a factor in the collision.

    DEM presented the case to the Office of Attorney General Peter Neronha, which determined the facts and circumstances did not rise to the level of criminal conduct, the press release says. In order to charge Teixeira with a felony, it would have to be proven he intended or foresaw the consequence, knew his actions were wrong but proceeded anyway, or willingly acted recklessly knowing it would cause a death, according to the press release.

    “My heart goes out to the Tartaglino family who has suffered a terrible loss,” DEM Director Janet Coit said in a prepared statement. “Boating on a crowded waterway in the summertime is very complicated and requires vigilance. Further, while there are rules governing the action of each vessel, some vessel operators either don’t know or follow the rules. That is why DEM urges all boaters to take a safety course.”

    In Rhode Island, successful completion of a boating safety course is required for all boaters born after Jan. 1, 1986, who operate a boat with a motor greater than 10 horsepower, and for all operators of personal watercraft regardless of age.
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    Details Of Tartaglino Accident Emerge

    Steve Flynn of Newportri.com Reports

    Law enforcement officers investigated the accident and DEM released their findings last week. They found no evidence Frank Teixeira, 75, of Portsmouth, intended or foresaw the consequences of his operations, knew his actions were wrong but proceeded anyway, or willingly acted recklessly knowing it would cause a death.

    NEWPORT – Alex Byczko of Ontario, Canada, was sitting on the left pontoon of the catamaran, the port side, while Sandra Tartaglino of Tiverton, was on the right pontoon, starboard, as they traveled south on a port tack towards the center span of the Pell Bridge, according to a state Department of Environmental Management incident report.

    “Without warning a power vessel traveling west struck the sailboat on its port side, at approximately a 90-degree angle, and rode over the sailboat, causing it to spin 180 degrees to port,” Byczko told DEM Environmental Police Officer Anthony Esposito, according to Esposito’s report of the fatal accident that killed Tartaglino on Aug. 11, a Sunday afternoon, around 2:45 p.m.




    Tartaglino disappeared from sight at the time of the collision, Byczko told the officer.

    “Once both vessels settled in the water, Byczko said he observed Tartaglino floating face down in the water with a large amount of blood around her,” the officer’s narrative said. “Byczko said that he requested that the parties aboard the powerboat attempt to bring Tartaglino aboard their vessel, but they were unable to do so, stating, ‘we don’t know how to get her up.’”
    Law enforcement officers investigated the accident and DEM released their findings last week. They found no evidence Frank Teixeira, 75, of Portsmouth, intended or foresaw the consequences of his operations, knew his actions were wrong but proceeded anyway, or willingly acted recklessly knowing it would cause a death, according to a DEM press release.

    “Mr. Teixeira has expressed profound grief over this tragic accident,” wrote attorney Christopher Gontarz, in a statement sent to the Daily News on behalf of Teixeira.

    “He and his family express their deepest condolences to the family of Sandra Tartaglino,” the statement said. “As the thorough and complete investigation by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, United States Coast Guard, Newport Police Department and the Rhode Island Department of Attorney General states, this was a tragic calamity which has profound consequences for my client and especially for the Tartaglino family.”

    DEM released a 15-page incident report to the Daily News on Monday after the newspaper filed an Access to Public Records request late last week.

    The 2005 powerboat was a 28-foot white True World cabin cruiser called @Last valued at $50,000, the report says. The 2001 18-foot Nacra F18 Catamaran was valued at $18,000. Both vessels had hulls of fiberglass and uniglass, the report said.



    According to the report, Byczko, who was still on the catamaran after the collision, attempted to signal assistance from some personal water craft operating in the area, but the operators did not respond.

    Teixeira told Environmental Police Officer Kevin Snow that he and his passenger, Patricia McKay of Portsmouth, departed Casey’s Marina in Newport at about 2:30 p.m. bound for Potter Cove in Jamestown, according to Snow’s report. They were underway for about 15 minutes when they crossed under the center span of the Pell Bridge.

    Teixeira “said that they crossed under the bridge in a westerly direction, passing under the bridge at an angle almost parallel to the bridge, Snow wrote. “Teixeira said he never saw the sail boat until it was ‘right there’ in his immediate vicinity. Once the collision occurred, he circled back to assess what had happened. He observed the body, later identified as that of Sandra Tartaglino in the water with a large amount of blood.”

    Teirxeira said he and his wife immediately put out a distress call to the Coast Guard over VHF Channel 16 and signaled for help from other boats in the area.

    The Newport Harbormaster boat, manned by Assistant Harbormaster George Crowninshield and Thomas Dunn, was the first rescue vessel on scene, arriving from the south, and recovered the victim from the water, according to Snow’s report.

    The harbormaster crew covered Tartaglino and brought her to the Sail Newport dock at Fort Adams State Park, Snow wrote. The state medical examiner arrived on the scene at about 5:20 p.m., Snow said.


    “When the victim’s body was uncovered, I observed severe trauma to the right side of the head, consisting of deep gauges through the skull, with crushed skull bone visible,” Snow wrote. “There was also a visible slice to the right hand. ...The Medical Examiner transported the body from the scene.”

    Snow attended Tartaglino’s autopsy on Aug. 13., where he observed she had a severed finger on the right hand.

    “All of the other injuries were concentrated on the upper back, neck, and head,” Snow wrote. “There were deep, slicing wounds to the head and neck that the Medical Examiner said were consistent with being caused by a boat propeller.”

    Soon after the accident happened, a Coast Guard vessel arrived from the north, according to the report. Newport and Warwick fire boats also were on the scene with the Jamestown harbormaster’s boat.

    Byczko estimated the catamaran was approximately “half a kilometer,” just over 1,600 feet, from the Jamestown shoreline when the accident occurred, according to Esposito’s report. He said the catamaran was “sitting flat” with both pontoons in the water.

    Tartaglino, the owner of the catamaran, and Byczko, were racing in the New England 100 regatta, but there was low wind at the time, according to the report.

    “Byczko does not recall if he was tethered to the catamaran at that time, but said he did not go overboard at all,” Snow wrote. “He was initially stunned, but collected himself quickly. After the initial collision, the catamaran continued sailing in a northerly direction. Byczko explained that this type of racing catamaran ‘wants to keep sailing.’ ”


    “Mr. Teixeira explained that his bow was ‘on the stern’ of the catamaran, which is a true statement, and consistent with the evidence and dynamics of the collision,” Snow wrote. Teixeira had functioning radar on board at the time but did not have it on at the time of the accident, he wrote.

    The Rhode Island Bridge and Turnpike Authority did not have any camera footage of the area where the collision occurred, Snow said.

    After the accident, the Coast Guard and DEM officials decided to bring both boats to Fort Adams State Park.

    “I was able to observe that the main sail had a very large tear in the fabric running parallel to the boom,” wrote Environmental Police Lt. Daniel White in his report. “I also observed a black transfer and crushed fiberglass material on the inner, aft section of the starboard pontoon.”

    The boats later were transported to the Environmental Police Marine Base in Wickford.

    During inspections of the vessels, law enforcement officers found no indication of alcohol or drug use, or any alcohol containers on the boats.

    Teixeira was cited with four violations, each with a maximum fine of $100, of the Coast Guard’s Inland Navigational Rules. DEM will prosecute the case in the Rhode Island Traffic Tribunal and arraignment is set for Nov. 13. The violations include risk of collision, action to avoid a collision, responsibilities between vessels and failure to keep a look-out.


    Gontarz said he will represent Teixeira at that proceeding.

    Attorneys Peter Regan and Mark Boivin, both with the Sayer Regan & Thayer law firm of Newport, are representing the interests of the Tartaglino family, along with Marine Surveyor Chuck Murphy and Michael Collyer of Maritime Claims, LLC, according to Snow’s report.

    Regan and Boivin were not immediately available for comment.
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  7. #7
    Hard to believe there is not a criminally negligent element for this,
    but noticing the military status of Mr Teixeira sort of explains that.

  8. #8
    The fact that they could not assist at time of collision seems criminal enough.

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