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Thread: 2019 Transat Jacques Vabre Official Thread

  1. #21
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    Minimal Doldrums As Fleets Approach Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone




    Keel-less Hugo Boss en route to Cape Verde
    Crédit Mutuel extending as Class40 fleet gaps widen




    The route to victory for Charal and the IMOCA podium in the 14th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre may have just become lot simpler according to the official race meteorologist. Richard Silvani, from Météo France said that contrary the forecast a few days ago, the Doldrums are not looking so active now. Charal should enter the zone most feared by sailors tonight. The two Mulit50s leading the fleet are already in there.






    Tracker


    “The Doldrums are not very active because on each side of it the trade winds are well established,” was the analysis from Silvani, the official race meteorologist. “In fact, the two anticyclones that are positioned on either side of the equator, at the Azores in the northern hemisphere and St. Helena in the southern hemisphere, favour an established synoptic wind.”
    Doubtless that will make more sense to some than others and not all skippers will quite the same when they emerge from the notorious Doldrums. Many are and varied are the sages who have predicted a simple passage of the Doldrums, so unsurprisingly Silvani gave himself some insurance: The Doldrums are still tricky!” Silvani added.
    Doubtless that will make more sense to some than others and not all skippers will quite the same when they emerge from the notorious Doldrums. There seems to be a little wind in there, between 6 and 8 knots, but the squalls are active and the clouds are there. “The Doldrums are still tricky!” Silvani added.






    IMOCA
    For the IMOCA, that are beginning to see the sky thicken, the trade winds are getting weaker. Charal has begun its deceleration, but Apivia and Primonial, the third Multi50, were still clocking up nearly 19 knots this afternoon. Charal had lengthened its lead as the field stretched overnight with Apivia escaping from America’s 11th Hour Racing.
    The gaps will start coming down now but the picture will not be clear until all the boats are out of the Doldrums. At the 15:00 UTC ranking, Charal, despite slowing down first still had comfortably the best 24-hour run of the lead group (407 miles). It led by 84 miles from Apivia and 150 miles from 11th Hour Racing.
    The incredible resurrection of Thomas Ruyant and Antoine Koch on Advens for Cybersecurity has brought them back into a group of five IMOCA positioned to the west of the southern islands of the Cape Verde archipelago.




    More than 1,000 miles behind Charal, Ariel II, skippered by the Finnish/Irish crew of Huusela / Fergusson, is doing the best it can with a very damaged mainsail since the Bay of Biscay.
    Hugo Boss
    After cutting their damaged keel from the boat yesterday, Hugo Boss are making for the Cape Verde islands, about 850 almost due south of where they are now.





    Class40
    At the front, Crédit Mutuel (Lipinski / Hardy) are continuing to extend their lead in a Charal like way. Britain’s Sam Goodchild on Leyton and Aïna Enfance & Avenir. are holding on, but in the more consistent trade winds they are enjoying than at the front of the IMOCA.



    At the 15:00 UTC ranking, Crédit Mutuel, had made 381 miles in the last 24 hours, 21 more than Leyton and 31 more than Aïna Enfance & Avenir. They trail Crédit Mutuel by 51 and 69 miles respectively, but here is a more defined lead group of three boats now, with Banque Du Léman in fourth, 161 miles off the lead.
    This long port tack south is not about great strategy, but rather positioning and especially maximum speed.
    Aymeric Chappellier on Aïna Enfance & Avenir reported from the northern Cape Verde islands that they were getting sustained breeze of up to 30 knots at midday UTC: “It's a little humid, and we’re getting a little wet. We have 30 knots and big sea.
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    11th Hour Racing in the Hunt for Podium After Action-Packed Day as Equator Approaches




    11th Hour Racing in the Hunt for Podium After Action-Packed Day as Equator Approaches

    November 6, 2019 (Newport, RI) – With 11 days of racing behind them, 11th Hour Racing Team is in contention for a podium finish in the 2019 Transat Jacques Vabre as the IMOCA fleet approaches the equator and the final days of sailing into Salvador de Bahia, Brazil this week.

    The strong showing thus far for co-skippers Charlie Enright and Pascal Bidégorry comes perhaps as no surprise given the pair’s transatlantic experience and the proven speed of the 11th Hour Racing yacht, but run counter to the tempered expectations of Enright and the whole team.

    Several times during departure festivities in Le Havre, Enright was careful with his words. “We’re just hoping to finish and get as much information on our boat out of this as we can,” remarked Enright on the start weekend, viewing the Transat Jacques Vabre in the bigger scope of the team’s campaign towards The Ocean Race in 2021.

    But as the starting gun sounded last Sunday, October 27, Enright’s competitive juices kicked in as expected. The team has been full-on since despite a few setbacks, including the lack of connectivity for several days preventing the duo from getting proper weather reports, a penalty assessment and a day of sailing in which they faced the gamut of challenges.

    The team has been in the top five of the standings for much of the past week and was briefly in second place Wednesday as the pair headed towards the equator south of the Cape Verde Islands.

    “We’re doing everything we can just to push while it matters,” said Enright early this week. “We’re not getting a lot of rest. When the opportunity to strike comes, you’re like ‘we’re going to just grab it.’ It’s crazy trade wind sailing, so it’s push, push, push while we can.”

    More recently, the team was assessed a 1.5 hour penalty for inadvertently breaking the seal on the boat’s engine a day out from Le Havre. Following race protocols, Enright and Bidégorry immediately photographed and reported the incident to the race officials at the time and the seal was replaced.

    Race officials then assessed a 1.5 hour penalty after deliberations — a penalty that 11th Hour Racing served per race rules before crossing the equator. The team stopped racing at 8:37 local time (3:37am EST) on Wednesday and resumed racing 90-minutes later at 10:07 from the same coordinates where the penalty went into effect. The team dropped from third to fifth in the IMOCA standings during the suspension of racing.

    Taking the penalty was part of a very busy last 24 hours for Enright and Bidégorry. Over the span of Tuesday and into Wednesday morning, the pair dealt with the boat hitting something with the keel, a sail that went overboard and an engine that overheated.

    “We checked with the endoscope, no damage,” said Enright of the keel. “Then we lost a sail over the life lines, luckily it was tied on well, then the engine overheated, had to change out the exhaust system, while this was happening, we broached in a 30 knot puff and tore our A3. Once we got that under control we came back to a dead-ship...oh yeah, and we saw a water spout.”

    Enright and Bidégorry are now pushing on and extracting every bit of speed from the boat and their reserves from within — the equator just about a day away.

    “It will be a fight for that last spot (on the podium). We’ll keep pushing, we have been the whole time,” said Enright. “The pace has been pretty insane.”

    “It’s a drag race now,” said Bidégorry, as 11th Hour Racing dueled with other boats like Banque Populaire led by Armel Le Cleac’h and PRB with co-skipper Kévin Escoffier. “We’ve crossed paths several times with Banque Populaire under spinnaker and us under gennaker. Everyone is working out their own way.”

    After passing through the calm of the Doldrums and the equator, the “drag race” into Salvador will be back on and the quest to catch leaders Charal and Apivia will begin in earnest with 100 nautical miles separating the two leaders from the chase pack including 11th Hour Racing, Banque Populaire and PRB.

    Arrivals into Brazil for the IMOCA class leaders are expected on Saturday-Sunday morning. Follow all of the latest updates and race movements from 11th Hour Racing here.
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    Apivia Takes IMOCA Lead, Multi 50's Knocking On The Door, Lipinsky/Hardy Lead 40's




    Passed like a flower by the leader of Multi50, the Doldrums closed on Charal. Leading since Madeira, Jérémie Beyou and Christopher Pratt are back hunters behind the tandem Charlie Dalin and Yann Eliès 1200 miles from the finish. If the IMOCA race is fully revived, the Multi50, only a stroke of luck seems to be deprived of victory Group GCA-Mille and smiles, tomorrow night in Brazil. Class40 side, Credit Mutuel continues its demonstration. Facing a powerful trade wind, the fleet can only hope to regroup at the entrance of the Doldrums, still 500 miles away, to challenge the supremacy of the Lipinski-Hardy tandem.





    TRACKER

    Multi50: The leader expected tomorrow at night in Salvador de Bahia

    Keep your head cool, save the boat, touch wood, (not easy on a carbon trimaran ...), that's probably the motto aboard Groupe-GCA Mille et une smiles. For, apart from a twist of fate, it is hard to see what could prevent Gilles Lamire and Antoine Carpentier from entering the Bay of All Saints tomorrow evening. Nearly 200 miles ahead 800 miles from the goal, the numbers speak for themselves. That would be the double for Antoine Carpentier, winner last year in Class40 (alongside Maxime Sorel) and a first for Gilles Lamiré in three participations. As for the boat, it is one more line that will be added to the exceptional list of the VPLP plan launched in 2009 by Franck-Yves Escoffier.

    200 miles north of the leader, Solidaires en Peloton ARSEP clings but knows that the trade wind in the southern hemisphere is still more favorable to the leading competitor who touches the rotation eastward first. The angle opens and the speed increases. Primonial who comes out right from the Doldrums is not there and logically closes the march after his stopover Cape Verdean.







    IMOCA: Race resumed 1200 miles from the finish

    With 120 miles lead yesterday at Apivia, well in line, Charal seemed to be in control of the situation. 24 hours later, oops! The black foiler is 50 miles behind. What happened?

    "We were on a good trajectory, we took a last grain and after curtain," said bitter Jeremie Beyou this morning. "It's burgeoning all around us, we can not get out of it"

    On Apivia, Charlie Dalin thinks that "an east wave has grafted onto the Pot. In this phenomenon, the wind changes (it passes to the east) and in front of the wave, there is nothing. We made placement, we got away with what we had »




    We know the Pot-au-noir hardly predictable, but the reversal of such a brutal situation is unusual. The other competitors did not miss a thing! "Blows like that, we had all had, but here it is really steep" commented Jean Le Cam, 6th on Corum L'Epargne, at the entrance of the Pot. "What is certain is that when you have the game position every hour, it's easier for the hunter to shoot! "

    Jean refers here to refreshed positions on site mapping at shorter intervals than official rankings (every 4 hours). Skippers do not surf only on the waves but also on the web! This near-real-time vision was probably one more element to explain Apivia's shift in the east, which allowed him to avoid the trap Charal fell into ...




    There are about 200 miles left for the IMOCA leaders to get out of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, and the two leaders now have similar speeds. In other words, everything is possible 1200 miles from the finish.

    Especially since behind, it does not go wrong. 11th Hour Racing carries out its penalty of 1h30 following a rupture of its lead of propeller tree which allowed PRB to take away from him the third place, with touch-key with Banque Populaire. Still behind, a pack of ten boats rushes to the entrance of the Doldrums with 170 miles east-west. Suffice to say that nothing is played in this group led by the tandem Seguin Richomme Group Apicil.

    At the tail end of the fleet, some boats find themselves badly positioned in the east of Cape Verde and see the leaders of Class40 pass under their wind ...







    Class40: All behind and him in front!



    "It's sport, sport, sport! Exclaimed Kito de Pavant in a voice a little tired this afternoon. "It's a bit of a war on the boat. The sea and the wind are strong. We sail under large spinnaker and 2 reefs in the mainsail, and it is very hot under the dry suits. We can not wait for it to calm down ... "Off Cape Verde, following the hellish train printed by Crédit Mutuel, who digs up every standings, seems impossible. The Lipinski-Hardy tandem flies over the downwind debates, a kind of UFO in the Class 40 homogeneous fleet. What can its pursuers do if not hope for a tightening at the entrance of the Pot-au-noir? By then, the trade winds will certainly calm down but the tighter angle should not displease to Credit Mutuel, more at ease in the tailwind but also more powerful than its adversaries in the crosswind ...

    Leyton and Aïna Enfance & Avenir are on the alert 70-80 miles from the leader. Banque du Léman can still play the podium but behind, the gaps are starting to be considerable since the fifth Crosscall Chamonix Mont Blanc is already 250 miles away ... In the match "series boats", note the good positioning of Vogue with a Crohn , not far from Edenred. Everyone is now racing in the race and must set realistic goals. A philosophy written on the board of A everyone His Everest where Yves Courbon, enthusiastic as the first day said this afternoon "There is no time to take the lead, you have to take pleasure! "
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  4. #24
    1.5 hour penalty for 11th hour + Discarded code 3 doesn't bode well for podium.

  5. #25
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    The Boss Arrives At The Cape Verde Islands




    Alex Thomson Racing Update:

    Skippers Alex Thomson and Neal McDonald arrive safely to the

    Cape Verde Islands onboard HUGO BOSS



    This morning (Friday 8th November 2019), shortly after 08:00 UTC, British skippers Alex Thomson and Neal McDonald arrived safely into the Cape Verde Islands onboard the HUGO BOSS yacht.



    The skippers, who had been racing in the 4,350 mile double-handed Transat Jacques Vabre race from Le Havre, France to Salvador, Brazil, were forced to retire from the race when their IMOCA 60 race boat, HUGO BOSS, hit an unknown object submerged in the water.



    The incident, which occurred on the morning of Sunday 3rd November – when Thomson and McDonald were just over a third of the way into the race – left the pair with no choice but to detach their 4.5m long keel from the yacht and abandon their attempts to finish what was their debut race onboard the new HUGO BOSS boat.



    After cutting the keel free from the boat, the skippers – with support from their technical team based in Gosport on the UK’s south coast – embarked upon an 800 nautical mile journey to the Cape Verde Islands in order to bring themselves, and the boat, to safety.



    This morning, Thomson and McDonald were greeted by members of their technical team in Sao Vincente, Cape Verde, and together they brought the yacht safely into port.



    Upon arrival, Thomson said: “It was a pretty scary experience for both of us and we’re very pleased to be on dry land safely with the team.



    “From here, the next steps are to lift the boat out of the water in order to do a thorough assessment of the damage. We will then bring the boat back to the UK so that we can begin the necessary repair work, with a view to getting back out on the water as soon as possible.



    “This is of course a setback, but the team will be doing everything in its power to move swiftly forwards. As for our objective to win the Vendée Globe in 2020-21? Nothing changes. That remains the sole focus of our team”.
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    Multi 50's Finished, 1st IMOCA's Due In This Weekend




    After Groupe GCA – Mille et un sourires became the first boat to cross the line in the Bay of All Saints in the small hours of Friday morning under a magical moon, the second – Solidaires En Peloton – ARSEP -arrived in full flight in glorious sunshine. They crossed the line on Friday, November 8, 2019 at 14:53:01 (UTC ), 12 days 2 hours 38 minutes and 01 seconds after leaving Le Havre, France on Sunday, October 27 at 12:15 (UTC)






    Solidaires En Peleton – ARSEP covered the theoretical course of 4,350 miles at an average speed of 14.97 knots, but actually sailed 5,054 miles at an average speed of 17.39 knots. They finished 10 hours 3 minutes and 20 seconds behind the winner Groupe GCA – Mille et un sourires.

    IMOCA

    Apivialooks uncatchable now, broad reaching away south to the tip of north-east Brazil in 16-knot south-easterly trade winds. The first and only one of the leading group to make it cleanly out of the Doldrums on Thursday, Apivia have covered nearly 100 miles more (396 miles) in the last 24 hours than any of their pursuers.

    At the 15:00 UTC ranking they were 237 miles ahead of PRB in second with only 571 miles to the finish. PRB have no such luxury. Everyone is chasing them. In a 2010 boat without foils, it should be tough for Banque Populaireto hold on in third, five miles behind. America’s Charlie Enright on 11thHour Racingis just 24 miles behind. In normal circumstances they would all be worried by having Charal just another 25 miles behind. But it is hard to assess the physical and psychological effect that the Doldrums have had on Charal. The Doldrums have cost them 410 miles since they entered 120 miles ahead on November 5.

    “At last! We’re free from the Doldrums and VERY happy to be in the SE Trade Winds,” Britain’s Samantha Davies, lying eighth with her French co-skipper Paul Meilhat, said in her message today.

    “It is about 40deg Celsius and 100% humidity. Like sleeping in a sauna. Oh, a sauna that is attached to a roller coaster!!

    “The good thing is that we are going REALLY FAST and our old boat is definitely very happy with her new foils ????. We’re in the lead pack, albeit at the back of this pack, but we’re happy where we are, maybe we can gain a place on the run into Salvador…”







    Class40
    The music has stopped. The wind section has packed up and the leading skippers are hoping they haven’t gone for a long weekend.

    At the 15:00 UTC ranking the front of the fleet had all slowed down, Crédit Mutuel’s losses had finished and they had slightly extended to lead Britain’s Sam Goodchild on Leyton, by 65 miles, despite their corkscrew trajectory. The 2017 runner-up, Aïna Enfance & Avenir remained a further 24 miles behind in third, with all three on a similar track. Banque du Léman in fourth is a further 80 miles back. The whole front of the fleet is now down into single figure speeds and Crédit Mutuel reported completely stalling overnight.

    “A sinister place”, “Mordor” and just “merde” have punctuated some of the skipper’s logs and interviews. From the poetic to the prosaic, the choice of language changes with every breath of sailor and wind.

    “We’re into the thick of things now,” Adrien Hardy, Crédit Mutuel’s co-skipper said overnight. “We’ve been stalled for two or three hours. We hope it won’t last too long. It’s not easy, we’ve seen the forecasts, we have to stay close to the most direct route, and tack as directly south as we can. It's a radical change of atmosphere, yesterday, we were riding along at 15/20 knots and now I'm standing in the boat, and it’s not moving at all.

    We’re not looking too far behind us, we just have to get south as fast as possible; there’s nothing we can do, we just have to stay calm, it’ll be like that for one or two days. When you see that the IMOCA have still not got going again, it's not encouraging.”







    IMOCA podium battle heats up as Salvador welcomes first boats home
    Groupe GCA – Mille et un sourires win Multi50
    Apivia set for IMOCA victory
    The Class40 concertina
    Race time: 12 days 4 hours



    https://www.transatjacquesvabre.org/en/map-and-ranking




    Class40
    The music has stopped. The wind section has packed up and the leading skippers are hoping they haven’t gone for a long weekend.

    At the 15:00 UTC ranking the front of the fleet had all slowed down, Crédit Mutuel’s losses had finished and they had slightly extended to lead Britain’s Sam Goodchild on Leyton, by 65 miles, despite their corkscrew trajectory. The 2017 runner-up, Aïna Enfance & Avenir remained a further 24 miles behind in third, with all three on a similar track. Banque du Léman in fourth is a further 80 miles back. The whole front of the fleet is now down into single figure speeds and Crédit Mutuel reported completely stalling overnight.

    “A sinister place”, “Mordor” and just “merde” have punctuated some of the skipper’s logs and interviews. From the poetic to the prosaic, the choice of language changes with every breath of sailor and wind.

    “We’re into the thick of things now,” Adrien Hardy, Crédit Mutuel’s co-skipper said overnight. “We’ve been stalled for two or three hours. We hope it won’t last too long. It’s not easy, we’ve seen the forecasts, we have to stay close to the most direct route, and tack as directly south as we can. It's a radical change of atmosphere, yesterday, we were riding along at 15/20 knots and now I'm standing in the boat, and it’s not moving at all.

    We’re not looking too far behind us, we just have to get south as fast as possible; there’s nothing we can do, we just have to stay calm, it’ll be like that for one or two days. When you see that the IMOCA have still not got going again, it's not encouraging.”



    ETAs

    Multi50

    Primonial – Saturday, November 9, 14:00 (UTC)

    IMOCA

    Apivia – Sunday, November 10, 02:00 (UTC)

    PRB – 18:00

    Banque Populaire – 19:00

    11th Hour Racing – 20:00

    Arkea – Paprec – 21:00

    Advens for cybersecurity – 22:00



    Monday, November 11

    Initiatives-Cœur – 00:00

    Charal - 01:00



    Class40

    Crédit Mutuel – Wednesday, November 13
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    A Flurry Of Finishes In IMOCA


    Finish Photos © Jean-Louis Carli/Alea


    After arriving in the Bay of All Saints on Monday morning to complete his first transatlantic, Britain’s Will Harris, 25, recounted the moment he heard the boat alongside them in the middle of the North Atlantic – Hugo Boss – had hit something and lost their keel.

    “I remember when we got the news that Hugo Boss’s keel was hanging by a thread,” Harris, who was co-skipper to Boris Hermann on Malizia II – Yacht Club de Monaco, which finished twelfth after a surging comeback, said. “When you’re that close it makes it feels more real and it makes you understand the risks. Ten miles further east and that could have been us. It was really bad luck for them.”

    With the pontoons around the Terminal Turistico Nautico da Bahia in Salvador already full of boats and with so many finishers arriving in the bright sunshine and the tranquil waters of one of the biggest bays in the world, it is to forget how hard this race is, the near misses and those who have not made it here. The 14thedition of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre has been a lower wind race than in the past, but that does not make everything avoidable.

    “As soon as we heard the news we were suddenly more alert. But things like that are impossible to anticipate. Whatever they hit, a partially submerged container…it’s not something you can avoid.

    “The worst-case scenario is that you’re on the bow making a sail change and you go overboard. So, after that you make sure you’re always wearing a life jacket and clipping on. You can be a good sailor but if something like that is going to happen there is not always a lot you can do.”

    “So, yes, super happy to finally arrive here in Salvador, long time on the water and a tricky race for us, but it was still really good to come back into the mix towards the Doldrums.”

    For the 38-year-old German skipper, Herrmann, who knows Alex Thomson, the skipper of Hugo Boss, well there was sympathy and understanding. All the skippers have different priorities, but getting their boats to the destination is usually number one.

    “We sympathise with Alex,” Herrmann said. “What did we did notice is that it was on the Great Circle route from Panama to Gibraltar. So, there are going to be more boats on the a shipping route, so stuff floating around – like a container – is more likely on a big shipping highway.

    “It was good to hear their boat is already on its way back home – via the Cape Verde islands. When we heard the news, we wrote to Alex straight away and he wrote back and sounded positive and relaxed. We can’t do anything about partially submerged objects.”








    IMOCA: 13 boats finished – but penalties overturn leaderboard

    Thirteen IMOCA have joined the three Multi50 on the pontoons and the other half of the IMOCA fleet will stream in over the next few days in what have been closely fought battles between these boats of different generations stretching back over 20 years. After sailing around 5,000 miles, this has been a finish measured in minutes for all of the boats, with everyone bar the winner Apivia chasing or being chased.

    But even on the pontoons the results can change. Bureau Vallée, received a penalty of 1 hour and 30 minutes for breaking an engine seal, and so has been downgraded from eighth to tenth place after apparently winning a hard-fought three-way battle overnight.

    Meanwhile, Advens for Cybersecurity, forgot to round the last mark of the race at the entrance to the Bay of All Saints. The international jury will meet on Tuesday to decide the penalty they will receive, but given the very small gap with America’s 11th Hour Racing(less than 15 minutes) in fifth, Thomas Ruyant and Antoine Koch could lose their fourth place.

    As a reminder, PRB, 11th Hour Racing and Newrest Art & Fenêtreswere also penalised by 1 hour and 30 minutes for breaking engine seals, but had made their penalty turns during the race.







    ETAs

    Wednesday, November 13

    Campagne de France(Miranda Merron (Britain) and Halvard Mabiré) - 17:00

    Thursday, November 14

    4myplanet (Alexia Barrier and Joan Mulloy (Ireland – 13:00

    Pip Hare Ocean Racing(Pip Hare (Britain) and Ysbrand Endt (Holland) - 13:00

    Ariel II (Ari Huusela (Finland) and Michael Ferguson (Ireland) - 16:00





    Initiatives-Cœur finishes seventh in the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre IMOCA

    Britain’s Samantha Davies and French co-skipper, Paul Meilhat, on their 60ft monohull, Initiatives-Cœur, have finished seventh in the IMOCA class of the 14th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil on Sunday, November 10, 2019 at 21:45:44 (UTC), 14 days, 9 hours 30 minutes and 44 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy, France on Sunday, October 27 at 12:15 (UTC).

    Initiatives-Cœur covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 12.59 knots but actually sailed 4,962.94 nautical miles at an average speed of 14.36 knots. It finished 21 hours 22 minutes and 44 seconds behind the winner, Apivia

    Malizia II - Yacht Club de Monacofinishes twelfth in the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre IMOCA

    Boris Herrmann and Will Harris, on their 60ft monohull, Malizia II - Yacht Club de Monaco, have finished twelfth in the IMOCA class of the 14th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil on Monday, November 11, 2019 at 10:43:43 (UTC), 14 days, 22 hours 28 minutes and 43 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy, France on Sunday, October 27 at 12:15 (UTC).

    Malizia II - Yacht Club de Monaco, covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 12.13 knots but actually sailed 4,979.52 nautical miles at an average speed of 13.89 knots. It finished 1 day 10 hours 20 minutes and 43 seconds behind the winner, Apivia.



    Class40

    ETAs

    Thursday, November 14

    Crédit Mutuel –04:00 (UTC)

    Leyton – 09:00

    Aïna Enfance & Avenir– 15:00

    Friday, November 15

    Crosscall Chamonix Mont-Blanc – 01:00

    If the routing is to be believed all the action will be behind the podium in the edition. In 2017, the leading three were locked together along the coast of Brazil and Aïna Enfance & Avenirwere pushed into second place by just 17 minutes.

    At the 15:00 ranking, Britain’s Sam Goodchild on Leyton, has not been able to make an impression on the leader Crédit Mutuel who with 610 miles to the finish had extended the lead to 65 miles. Leyton though has retained a 73-mile lead overAïna Enfance & Aveniras they head towards Recife on the northeast coast of Brazil.

    It is not quite the conditions they were expecting with the southerly wind making it more of a wet upwind struggle. "We have 20-25 knots, it's very wet sailing. The podium is set but we must stay focused, studious and leave nothing to chance,” Ian Lipinski, the skipper of Crédit Mutuelsaid. “The problem is that the trade wind seems to be very southerly and we’re not going to open to open up much.”

    Behind them four boast are scrapping. Crosscall Chamonix Mont Blanc, Made in Midi, Linkt and Banque du Lémanare just 34 miles apart, with more than 70 miles of lateral separation, which could be the key figure, especially if the wind is not very generous at the end of the course.

    Meanwhile, in the northern hemisphere, Terre Exotique, one of the first Class40 ever launched, in 2004, is still 1,672 miles away from Salvador de Bahia.







    ************************
    IMOCA podium decided as PRB hold off Charal in epic finish
    Britain’s Samantha Davies charging to line – finishing today Class40 leading trio escape Doldrums
    SALVADOR DE BAHIA, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 10: PRB and Charal are fighting for 2nd and 3rd place in the Imoca category of the Transat Jacques Vabre 2019 on November 10, 2019 in Bahia, Brazil. Transat Jacques Vabre is a duo sailing race from Le Havre, France, to Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. (Photo by Jean-Marie Liot/Alea)
    Race time: 14 days 4 hours



    After Apivia coasted to a moonlit victory in the IMOCA class 15 hours earlier, the Bay of All Saints witnessed one of the closest podium finishes in the history of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre in glorious sunshine on Sunday. PRB held off Charal to take second place by just six minutes and 18 seconds, little over a mile after both had covered over 5,000 from Le Havre since the start a fortnight ago.

    Kévin Escoffier and Nicolas Lunven on their 60ft monohull, PRB, built in 2009, but upgraded with foils in 2018, had the latest-generation foiler and red-hot favourite at the start, Charal, breathing down their necks all the way long the coast of north-east Brazil. The gap closed to just over a mile, but as it went soft – an unstable 6-8 knot westerly, in the approach to the Bay of All Saints, Charal’s advantage evaporated and they could not find a way past.

    The 39-year-old Escoffier, from one of the most famous sailing families in France, must have drawn on all of his experience, as a winner of the Volvo Ocean Race last year, the Jules Verne Trophy in 2012 and of the 2005 Transat Jacques Vabre in the Multi50 to hold on.

    Not for nothing is this biennial double-handed race heralded as the longest and toughest transatlantic race in the calendar.

    For Jérémie Beyou, the winner of this race in 2013, and Christopher Pratt the last three days have marked a great comeback from sixth place and evidence of the speed of their boat, but it was not the podium place they were hoping for.

    As close as this chase was, the race will be remembered for their spectacular stall in the Doldrums – one of the most extraordinary in the history of offshore racing.

    Charal was 120 miles ahead of Apivia when they entered the Doldrums at around 07:30 on November 5. At times they completely stopped as Apivia redirected 50 miles east and flew by, almost without pause. Every time they had looked like finally escaping the clutches of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone, they were sucked back in.

    Apivia’s early acceleration in the trade winds meant that even when Charal was out of the Doldrums on November 8, they continued to lose miles, peaking at being 302 miles behind at the 19:00 (UTC) ranking on November 8 – a total loss of 422 miles.

    TRACKER

    IMOCA: Super Sunday as leading group streams in

    America’s Charlie Enright with French co-skipper, Pascal Bidégorry, finished fifth on 11th Hour Racing as the boats stacked up in the Bay of All Saints in quick succession. Britain’s Samantha Davies is not far behind in seventh and has closed to within 10 miles of Banque Populaire, but with only 34 miles to the finish.

    Arrivals

    Kévin Escoffier and Nicolas Lunven, on PRB, have finished second in the IMOCA class of the 14th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil on Sunday, November 10, 2019 at 16:04:42 (UTC), 14 days, 03 hours 49 minutes and 42 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy, France on Sunday, October 27 at 12:15 (UTC).

    PRB covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 12.84 knots but actually sailed 5,035 nautical miles at an average speed of 14.82 knots. It finished 15 hours 41 minutes and 42 seconds behind the winner, Apivia.

    Jérémie Beyou and Christopher Pratt, on Charal, have finished third in the IMOCA class of the 14th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre Normandie Le Havre after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil on Sunday, November 10, 2019 at 16:11:00 (UTC), 14 days, 3 hours 56 minutes and 0 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy, France on Sunday, October 27 at 12:15 (UTC).

    Charal covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 12.83 knots but actually sailed 5,116.17 nautical miles at an average speed of 15.05 knots. It finished 15 hours 48 minutes and 0 seconds behind the winner, Apivia.

    Class40: The leading trio escapes

    In contrast to Charal’s fate in the Doldrums in the IMOCA, Crédit Mutuel has held its healthy lead of 54 miles over Britain’s Sam Goodchild on Leyton. Now in the south-east trade winds, Leyton has carved out a 70-mile lead over Aïna Enfance & Avenir. The rest of the Class40s are still stuck in the Doldrums.

    “We’re beginning to have the unpleasant feeling of being the butt of a joke that has lasted for three days now, Valentin Gautier said from Banque du Léman, adding that they seen the maxi trimaran, Gitana on the AIS…doing 18 knots in the Doldrums! “Mostly, we’ve been calming our nerves by saying that it's the same for everyone, except that now, that's not the case! Our friends in the west, who we’ve been hunting, seem to have passed through without much trouble, and us hunters have become the hunted without even realising it.” told this morning in a message from the sea Valentin Gautier aboard Bank of Leman, which also adds to having seen the AIS maxi trimaran Gitana ... 18 knots in the Doldrums!



    Only 7 Class40s were still sailing in the north-east trade winds today – they still have the Doldrums awaiting them. The fleet stretches for 1,000 miles from Crédit Mutuel to Terre Exotique to the south of the Cape Verde islands.



    Class40

    Thursday, November 14

    Crédit Mutuel – 01:00

    Leyton – 06:00



    Damage: Arkea Paprec completely foiled!
    Without their port foil after damaging it in the delivery to Le Havre, Arkea Paprec, in 5th position at the exit of the Doldrums has now suffered the breakage of its starboard foil. They are in ninth and dropping. “We got out of the Doldrums reaching on a port tack, with 16-20 knots of wind, flat sea, so we said ‘these are our conditions, let’s go, it’s time to put our foot to the floor’,” Sébastien Simon said. “We were starting to think the podium was possible but two hours later the foil broke, without warning. So, we’re in a sailing without foils. There’s not much left of her.”
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