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Thread: 2019 Brest Atlantiques Blasts Off

  1. #21
    Ouch.

    I suspect that section was sacrificial.

    Coville seems to be under control.

  2. #22
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    Cape Town Approaches


    Photo: Martin Keruzoré / Sodebo


    After a little over 15 days of racing, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, leader of "Brest Atlantiques" since Rio, is preparing this Wednesday early evening to cross the second and final mark of course, Robben Island, off the coast. Cap. With on his heels the trimaran MACIF and Actual Leader, auguring a long ascent to breathtaking Brest. Sodebo Ultim 3 is going to stop to evaluate the damage resulting from the loss of the rear of its starboard float.

    During a session organized by his team on Tuesday, François Gabart summed up the general feeling that animates all observers of "Brest Atlantiques": "The four boats live a scenario rather new, very tight after more than fifteen days of racing. It is a pleasant surprise to see us all in competition mode at this stage of the race. " With 216 miles behind only between the first, Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, and the fourth Sodebo Ultim 3, Wednesday at 16h, after more than 8000 miles traveled, the race actually offers a scenario that few imagined initially Brest on November 5th, convinced that large differences would separate each other in Cape Town, the second and last mark of course.

    Finally, it is in a handful of hours that will be the differences at the foot of Table Mountain, where the leader, Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, led by Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier, is expected Wednesday around 20h. Asked by his media man Yann Riou Wednesday morning, Franck Cammas evoked this approach of Cape Town:"As we arrive from the south, we will go along the coast to Table Mountain, they are quite fantastic landscapes, I hope we can enjoy it, it's always nice to enjoy it in these races where we do not see much land. In addition, Cape Town is a place that everyone likes, it's our case with Charles, we stopped there on the Volvo Ocean Race. There, we hope not to stop there, we will then have a passage at the beginning of the night at Robben Island, before heading north and find a little more lenient latitudes. "



    TRACKER


    Second of "Brest Atlantiques", the trimaran MACIF (François Gabart / Gwénolé Gahinet), pointed at 16h 90 miles from the leader, should in turn ride Cape Town towards Robben Island, 3-4 hours later, around midnight, followed in the middle of the night by Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella (Actual Leader) who, to keep in touch with the leading boats at this stage of the race, have certainly benefited from the damages of their competitors - the reliability of their boat was however one of Assets claimed by the skippers from Brest - but also managed to trim their trimaran, never releasing mentally, even when they were more than 500 miles behind the first.



    As for Thomas Coville and Jean-Luc Nélias, they should arrive Thursday morning in Cape Town, they planned to put their race in parentheses 1 mile west of the entrance to the South African port, their technical team can then climb aboard Sodebo Ultim 3 then, once docked, look at the rear float, evaluate the damage and possible repairs, as explained Wednesday Thomas Covlile in a video sent by his media man, Martin Keruzoré:"We will update Cape Town on the condition of the boat. Apart from the fact that we lost a piece of float, it remains an intact boat and in super condition, we made sure that it is the case to attack the second part of the course, long and complicated. There, we will check to see if everything is viable. Then we will consider a departure or not Cape Town, we must weigh the pros and cons, carefully study the conditions under which we would leave "





    **************************




    The bypass of the Saint Helena High has not been easy for Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier who have gagged eight times in all, the last late Tuesday night, to finally point the bows of Maxi Edmond de Rothschild to The Cape, which they are distant Wednesday morning about 250 miles and where they are expected at the head of "Brest Atlantiques" around 20h, after a little more than 15 days by sea. The trimaran designed by Guillaume Verdier and the design office the Gitana Team has regained speed this morning (30.5 knots in the last four hours), and if it could be slowed in the coming hours by a small ridge anticyclonic (extension of the St. Helena anticyclone) Stack on the road, the end of the day to Cape Town looks fast.

    Behind, François Gabart and Gwénolé Gahinet, on the trimaran MACIF, second Wednesday 96 miles from the leader, have had only two gybes stalling in the Great South before heading to South Africa, while the Third, Actual Leader, will not have done any! Yves Le Blevec and Alex Pella will have been the big beneficiaries of the Forties, managing to reduce by more than half the gap separating them from the leader (from 392 to 188 miles between Monday and Wednesday mornings). Fourth, Thomas Coville and Jean-Luc Nélias, despite the loss of the starboard rudder and then the back of the Sodebo Ultim 3 float, manage to maintain good speeds (25.5 knots over the last four hours), they accuse 255 miles delay on the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild and should arrive Thursday morning in Cape Town, where their technical team is waiting for them.

    The top three boats should pass at the foot of Table Mountain by night, they will then leave Robben Island, 4 miles north of the great South African metropolis, port side, before attacking the ascent of the South Atlantic , who, according to Christian Dumard, weather consultant of the race management, should probably drive them back to Brazil:"It's going to go downwind along Africa, then there will be a choice between going to Dakar or refocusing to the west. The roads tend to return to Brazil, because even if the road is longer, the Doldrums are thinner than they are in the east and in any case, in the longer term, they will have to the tour of the Azores anticyclone by the west. The road along Africa is more risky, it takes success and bet on a favorable weather system both in the Doldrums and North Atlantic, but it happens that boats choose this option , this was the case of the Multi 70 Maserati in 2018 on the record of the Tea Route between Hong Kong and London. "
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    Half Way Home For Macif




    On Tuesday, François Gabart, Gwénolé Gahinet and Jérémie Eloy were making headway at nearly 30 knots on a course leading to the Cape, the southernmost headland on the African continent, where the Brest Atlantiques’ second course marker is located. During a radio session, the MACIF trimaran’s skipper talked about what the trio had been through since Rio, sailing close-hauled in a very rough sea for three days and the state of the boat after 16 days at sea – roughly half way – and the real significance of the 140 miles that separates the MACIF trimaran from the leader, the maxi Edmond-de-Rothschild. So here is the transcript:




    François how is the MACIF trimaran crew this Tuesday?

    François Gabart: “Not bad! We had a fairly quick transition day yesterday and we returned to heavy swell and speeds nearing 30 knots, i.e. 60 km/h.

    You must be feeling the cold, mustn’t you?

    F. G.: “I have my all-weather gear on and my boots and hats are within reach. We’ve just gybed on the edge of the ice, 46 degrees South. We’re not far from the most southernmost point of the Brest Atlantiques, the coldest region on the course. As of tomorrow evening, we will start feeling a little warmer as we get closer to the Cape.”

    The battle with the Edmond-de-Rothschild maxi, Sodebo and Actual Leader is quite something!

    F. G.: “Gitana is running very fast, at great speeds, but we’re not far off. We’re hanging on to try and catch up with them. In the last 24 hours, the weather has been in our favour. We gained a few miles yesterday and we lost a little during the night. Midway, we’ve a gap of just over 100 miles between us and Gitana, and there’s still a long way to go: 7,000 miles. Sodebo has a problem, but Actual Leader is close, roughly 200 miles away, which is something to be reckoned with. The four boats are experiencing something quite unusual. They are at very close quarters after fifteen days of racing. It is a pleasant surprise to see us all battling it out at this stage of the race.”




    Half way there, do you think you are close to settling on a route plan for the next part of the course?

    F. G.: “We’re a little late in relation to the weather statistics we worked on earlier. On my record single-handed round the world (the Antoine de Saint-Exupéry trophy), after 16 days of racing, I was vertically below Madagascar. In our predictions, we should already have been arriving at the Cape. The weather was fairly favourable up until the Doldrums, but then the weather made things difficult as we approached the Brazil coast. And, since Rio, on a section that should have gone fairly quickly, we ended up sailing close-hauled in a sea that was not conducive to good speeds. We found ourselves just ahead of the low, as expected, but with a very eastern wind and a very rough head on sea. What will our estimated time of arrival be in Brest? It’s still too early to say, but it’ll be early December.”

    Since you left Rio, you have experienced some really rough conditions. Do you remember ever having seeing that before?

    F. G.: “Naturally, I’ve experienced some difficult times in the past. What makes what we’ve just been through different, is that it lasted for three days, without any real change. That said, a sailor’s memory is selective and you quickly forget tough times. Thank goodness for that, as you’d never set sail again (laughs).”

    You must be relieved to have this complicated bit behind you!

    F. G.: “You hang on in there. There’s not much manoeuvring to do, but it’s still very tiring. It’s difficult to rest, sleep, eat, and move around the boat. I’m just glad no one hurt themselves, despite the times we flew across the boat. That’s the main thing. The boat required quite a lot of time-consuming small jobs, which we began when the conditions improved. As for the boat, she’s not in the same condition she was in when we left, particularly with the rudder change, but the crew is in great form, even if we are lacking a little sleep.”

    With the benefit of hindsight, was your stop over for 19 hours in Rio really necessary?

    F. G.: “Without the rudder, the boat was only working well 90% of the time, which means that we were unable to control her for 10% of the time. It would have been very difficult, particularly in the no-sail area due to ice. We wouldn’t have taken that risk. When you sail alongside icebergs, as we are doing now, it wouldn’t be reasonable to sail without a rudder, even if it is always difficult to accept losing time. The team worked really well. It was a tough call and we succeeded in getting back to sea in good conditions. I have no regrets.”

    Did it have an effect on your pace?

    F. G.: “It’s always strange to stop on a pontoon when you’re racing, but it did mean we were able to sleep and recharge our batteries. We had no difficulty getting back into the race immediately afterwards. We didn’t cut corners on this stopover. The watchword was: “No rushing”. The weather situation meant that by leaving a little later we were not that disadvantaged, due to a ridge, which acted like a barrier ahead of Gitana. If we had left 24 hours earlier from Rio, we would have been a hundred miles better off, but we would not have gained 12 or 14 hours on Gitana. Despite damage to the four boats, we are at close quarters, particularly as it’s really rough ahead.”

    When do you think you’ll get to the Cape?

    F. G.: “We’re going to round Robben Island, where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 17 years, on Wednesday night, maybe in the early hours of Thursday morning. It could be daylight at 04:00 UT, at the Cape. If we could see Table Mountain, it would be more enjoyable and not quite as dangerous. In the meantime, we will have an area of flat calm to cross tomorrow evening. We will then sail up the Atlantic along the African coast, running past Namibia, an area I have never sailed in before. The goal will be to sail wide of the St Helena high, which we will run round by the south. We will sail fast, even though the conditions won’t be perfect. The trade wind isn’t very strong and the high is split into several areas. Then, it’ll be back to the Doldrums, where you always need a little luck.”


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    The There Were Three



    TRACKER


    The evening of Wednesday then the day of Thursday were animated on the side of Cape which saw passing and / or stop the four trimarans engaged on "Brest Atlantiques". Maxi Edmond de Rothschild opened the ball by leaving Robben Island to port on Wednesday at 20:16, while at night, the trimaran MACIF stopped for a technical stop before leaving at 10:20, on the heels of Actual Leader. Finally, Sodebo Ultim 3 is docked since 11am.

    It took 15 days 9 hours and 16 minutes of sea Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, after 9161 miles traveled, 24.8 knots of real average, to cross the first Wednesday at 20h16, the mark of Robben Island, off the Cape . A night passage for Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier who still enjoyed the sunset on Table Mountain, the smells of the earth, and especially the fact of not being too arrested in Cape Bay, as entrusted the first: " We went from 30 knots of wind to zero, not even a minute, we wondered when we would get out of it. Finally, we had a wind that came back to the other side and we were able to get out. I think we can stay "tanked" hours and hours in Cape Bay, so we're happy to beout. Now the next waypoint is Brest. "








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    A little less than eight hours later, the trimaran MACIF arrived in Cape Town, suspending its race at 3:55 am for a technical stopover, at the cape in front of the South African port, which lasted 6 hours and 25 minutes. Back in the race at 10:20, François Gabart and Gwénolé Gahinet crossed Robben Island in the third place 24 minutes later, 14 hours and 28 minutes after the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, 3 hours and 10 minutes after the Leader News, which came in second, its best place since the departure of Brest on November 5th (Yves Le Blevec and Alex Pella have traveled 390 miles less than Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier on the section Rio-Cape Town).

    In a video sent by the MACIF trimaran media man, Jérémie Eloy, François Gabart came back on this second technical stop, after the Rio stop: " We had a lot of small problems that made the boat complicated to maneuver, we took advantage of the we were passing near the coast to make a small stopover. We arrived right at dawn on Cape Town, the corner is still beautiful, this mountain(Table Mountain)has a certain charisma, but we did not have too much time to do the contemplation, we were more in the concentration to try to chain. The good news is that we leave with a boat that is well. "And the winner of the 2012 Vendée Globe to add, about the rest of the program:"We have two boats to chew in front of us, one that is not very far, the other is a little further. We saw Actual and Sodebo in Cape Town, we'll try to go see Gitana, we'll have to get banged to get them, but we're here for that, we want to play until the end. "













    This is certainly also the case of Thomas Coville and Jean-Luc Nélias who, at the moment when the trimaran MACIF took the sea, interrupted their race at 10:30, before going to moor Sodebo Ultim 3 at the foot of a dock located in Alfred Basin, in the port of Cape Town. When asked by Martin Keruzoré on his arrival on the mainland, Thomas Coville explained: "We met MACIF when we arrived, then we went back to the center of Cape Town to check the boat and see if, following the three shocks, we had on our three different rudders, the integrity of the boat was confirmed for the rest of the course. We'll know more tonight and we'll make a decision later. "
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    Gybing Up The Namibian Coast




    After their passage in Cape between Wednesday and Thursday, the three trimarans of "Brest Atlantiques" currently at sea - Sodebo Ultim 3 is still in technical stop - began a tedious climb along the Namibian coast in a relatively weak wind. forces them to jibe according to the variations of this one. "The situation is good at the coast during the day, because it gets hot and the wind swings to the coast, while at night, there is less wind so it is better to deviate," says Christian Dumard , weather consultant of the race management.

    For the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild (Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier), this weaving session seems to be over, as he set sail north-west, north of a St. Helena high pressure which extends over the entire width of the South Atlantic. His lead over his pursuers has further increased, he counts this Friday at 8h 304 miles ahead of Actual Leader (Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella) and 314 on the trimaran MACIF (François Gabart / Gwénolé Gahinet), which are at contact. "Already, it is a little faster than them, especially compared to Actual Leader, but in addition, the wind is a little more favorable in the north, continues Christian Dumard.As the anticyclone moves slowly towards Africa, it creates less regular winds, it's a bit like Gruyère, sometimes there are wind holes, we see it with the speeds of Actual Leader and MACIF which are not very regular. "



    TRACKER



    And the weather consultant to add, about these last two: "The question that will arise is how far they will go north, they will have a decision to make this night between continuing to ride along the coast one more day or heading north-west, as did the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild this morning. " It has indeed entered its third Atlantic crossing of" Brest Atlantiques ", heading north-east Brazil and equator " in a wind not very consistent and not very strong " , according to Christian who sees Dumard Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier find the northern hemisphere "November 28" .

    As for Sodebo Ultim 3, while Thomas Coville, Jean-Luc Nélias and Martin Keruzoré enjoyed a warm dinner and a good night's sleep in a cozy bed in Cape Town, the technical team continued to work night on the starboard float, a decision is expected on the continuation of the adventure.




    Joined this Friday at the weekly "Brest Atlantiques", François Gabart told the stopover in Cape Town and the rise of the MACIF trimaran along the Namibian coast.

    The coasts of Namibia. "It's quite impressive, it's a corner that we do not know very well, the map is pretty rough in the corner, we end up alongside the pebbles less than a mile, it's always impressive, it is extraordinarily beautiful, with sand dunes going into the mountains. There are not many people on the beach, it is the desert, however, there are always whales and the world in the water. "

    Stopover in Cape Town."The stopover was shorter than that of Rio, we did not go back to port, we were stopped in front of the port, it was shorter and it was a little less disconnected compared to Rio stopover, we were still in the game. It was quite amazing to see the boats go by, Actual happened when we were stopped, Sodebo arrived when we left. It was special to see the others moving forward while we were at work stopping, but it was essential, both for the performance and for the safety: without detailing too much, because we keep our little secrets during the second stretch of the South Atlantic, the boat was still pretty handicapped in terms of performance, so if only for that, we will quickly catch up with what we lost during the stopover. There was not really a choice. And in terms of safety, it was even more important to stop, it had to be done. The guys in the team did a crazy job, they had just returned from Rio they went back to Cape Town, they do not sleep much more than us, maybe less, and despite everything, they do great work, hyper accurate, without doing any nonsense, without rushing. "

    The regatta with Actual Leader and, later, with Maxi Edmond de Rothschild."It's cool, we're not very far, we saw Actual Leader not very long ago, we still see a small point, we spent this morning, we managed to find the first new wind along the African coast, it's great. In front, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild has a little more wind than us at the moment, it is not exactly in the same system, it digs a little, but it is really not very far. We have boats that are able to go very fast, so a few hundred miles, it can only be a few hours and we are at "donf" to not let go! We will try to go as fast as possible, focused on the boat, there are almost two weeks of racing, it can happen so much in two weeks, we must take the days and hours one after the other. And it does not depend only on us, there are things that we do not control, but I have no doubt about the fact that others will navigate well, we just have to get to navigate a little better , it is the objective. "

    The strategy to come. "The bypass of the anticyclone is not simple, the trade wind is not very well established north of the anticyclone, there are plenty of" gybes "to manage, small trajectories, after there can be two options that are outlined before the Doldrums that can have consequences on the approach that can be had from the doldrums. In my head, it's pretty clear, but we still have until Sunday to choose. For the moment, we are concentrating on going along the Namibian coast, trying to escape the clutches of the anticyclone, which is not far away. Sunday morning, it will be necessary to see in the long term, but for the moment, it seems clear. "




    Joined this Friday at the weekly "Brest Atlantiques", Yves Le Blevec told the conditions encountered by Actual Leader along the Namibian coast.

    The African coasts. "We just had a magical edge in front of the beaches of Namibia, we walk along the desert, it's amazing, we are in places where nobody ever comes.

    South Atlantic. "It was really different between the first and the second part of the South Atlantic. The first part was really hard, there was a very hard sea face, all the game was to pull the reins of the boat to prevent it from racing and avoid the stupidity. It was very stressful and even going slowly was hard to master. All the boats have suffered a little. The second part, from Gough Island, the sea was completely smooth, and there, we spent two-three days much faster and easier, a little cool but very pleasant. "

    The duel with the trimaran MACIF. "The fight is a little over, they passed in the late night. This is not totally surprising considering the performance of the boats, but it is always a little annoying to be doubled. But what they say on board is that we lost the battle of MACIF, but we did not lose the war. And I really would not have bet from Brest on the fact of finding myself side by side with MACIF after sixteen days of racing, for us, it's quite extraordinary, it's very good for the race and it puts us an extra sting. We instantly measure the miles earned and miles lost, it's pretty cool and it's a great pleasure to be able to race side by side, the MACIF sail, we still see it in front of us. "

    The strategy to come. "We have a decision to make tonight to know what we will do tomorrow morning, because there are two options that are roughly equivalent in time: one that will go on the road closer to a point of the Equator, which is about the same as that of the descent, and there is a road that goes much further north and allows you to choose later if you go to the equator or we continue along the African coast. We will choose a coherent strategy with the boat. So far, it works and it's really what we put on the top of the pile in the decisions we will take. "

    A word from Alex Pella: "We have a good pace, a very good bunk, a very good sleeping bag that allows us to recover quickly, with a very good cook on board, Ronan Gladu, so we have the energy to rest well on board! "








    Joined this Friday at the weekly "Brest Atlantiques", Charles Caudrelier told the passage of Cape Town and the conditions encountered by the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild along the Namibian coast.

    The passage of Cape. "Cape Town, it reminded me of the editions of the Volvo Ocean Race, beautiful arrivals, lots of emotions, lots of family memories with children, but also meetings, visits ... we had regrets not to stop, but it's like that. And above all, for us, the goal was to find a way to pass without losing too much, because we know very well that Table Mountain cuts the wind and that there is always a very delicate area to pass that worried us, with hyper brutal transitions, you go from 30 knots to 3 knots in 200 meters, then you take 30 knots in 200 meters, it is always dangerous. There were also a lot of fish and nets. "

    The rise of the African coasts."It's new for us all, I think, it's quite special, because we are along a very hot continent with very cold water, it makes us a very bizarre wind. Sometimes we have 20 knots of wind, but it does not move forward, because there is no wind on the surface because of the cold water, and sometimes, we have 20 knots and we're going full blast. So it's complicated, you never know where to go, there are a lot of wind rotations, rib effects, you have to go to the coast during the day, but not at night, it's pretty technical, we "jibe" a lot, it's tiring. And we are stressed by collisions. Tonight, we tapped four-five pieces of I do not know what, so that's what worries us. We can not wait to get away from the coast, which is full of fish. There are also wooden trunks. Tonight, we thought the race was going to stop, we have nothing but it's a miracle. "

    The ability of the boat to fly at different speeds."The boat is flying well. Compared to the others, we have an ability to fly a little earlier, it is an advantage and it also allows us to pass well in the sea. Now, we have stolen less than we wanted because we have had a plane failure which did not allow us to fly before Bahia, we lost a lot when we switched to non-flying mode, it is not at all the same performance. This is new, if we manage to return to Brest, it will be the first time that a boat in flying mode can do as many miles. We are sure that it is the future. At first when they designed the boat, we did not believe it too much, we saw that we were flying on flat water on the America's Cup, but flying in the sea was something else, the Gitana Team. did, proved that it was possible, now everyone will go down that road. "

    The strategy to come."People who are on the ground should not understand why we are going to Brazil while Brest is north. The problem is that there is a windless zone along the African coast that forms a triangle and whose point is towards the west, in general, we try to go to the tip. But to go to the point, it means to lengthen the distance enormously, it's all the dilemma. And it is the most severe attack that can carry our comrades for a moment: they can say to themselves that we have been too far and suddenly, they will cut. And the 300 miles we have, if we go too far in the west, we can lose them and be tied. Now it's good to cut to the east, but after that, you find yourself facing the wind to go up, while in the west, you find yourself looking for depressions with a better angle. This is the difficulty and like the North Atlantic, it is still very far, in six days, we do not know yet what will be the weather. There, for the moment, I think that everyone will have about the same strategy, because there is no wind in the east, everyone will go a little towards the west, but the whole question is how far. It's not easy and the danger for us leaders is to see someone cut. If it's the same road as us, we'll keep our lead if we do not have any damage, but the question is how far. It's not easy and the danger for us leaders is to see someone cut. If it's the same road as us, we'll keep our lead if we do not have any damage, but the question is how far. It's not easy and the danger for us leaders is to see someone cut. If it's the same road as us, we'll keep our lead if we do not have any damage,but if he cuts, he can return. So that's the big question and I do not have the answer. "

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    Sodebo Abandons Brest Atlantiques




    Thomas Coville and Jean-Luc Nélias, in agreement with Sodebo, made the difficult decision to give up, a choice that is above all related to their safety and the integrity of the boat.

    Since November 5, they lead the latest giant trimarans at speed on the oceans. In the tempo of other competitors, they made a very fast descent to Rio - also taking advantage of stopovers trimarans Edmond de Rothschild and Macif to take the lead to bypass the brand in Brazil.

    It is unfortunately the impact with an OFNI (unidentified floating object) in the night of Sunday 17 to Monday, November 18, in the middle of the South Atlantic that has compromised the continuation of this beautiful sporting and human adventure, forcing Thomas, Jean-Luc and Martin to stop yesterday in Cape Town to repair.

    For 24 hours the Sodebo Ultim 3 team has been hard at work in the South African port to repair the damage done to the rear of the float following the damage of the starboard rudder.

    The technical team also carried out an accurate and careful inspection of the trimaran and discovered this morning an injury on the starboard foil, linked in principle to the same impact. In pairs, sailing with a damaged foil and less rudder on the same side can be risky, the boat can become uncontrollable at any time.

    It is with bitterness but with the good marine sense that Thomas and Jean-Luc made the decision not to start again in the race.

    They will take the direction of France in a few days in crew so as to bring the boat safely.

    This first race of Sodebo Ultim 3 will remain rich of lessons and promising for the continuation of the program. Indeed since the departure of Brest, the trimaran has shown its reliability in very committed conditions and its potential for future confrontations to come.




    Explanations of Thomas Coville:
    "We arrived at dock yesterday in Cape Town after a serious damage to the starboard float that first ripped our saffron and then the back of the float. Before taking the long climb to finish the Brest Atlantiques, we wanted to make sure that the boat was honest. Upon further investigation it was discovered that the starboard foil had also been impacted. This prevents us from continuing safely, in the performance worthy of the Brest Atlantic and what we had done so far. The race was strong, in very muscular conditions for a new boat and we managed to do the whole melee descent with the best. In Rio, after the stopovers of Macif and Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, we take the lead. The whole race goes well until the violent shock that disabled us. On a first year and a first race we learned a lot. It was a race with strong twists but it deserved to be a great race. It is a great frustration to have to give up. We will bring the boat back as a crew for safety reasons and for the program to continue. We are building something big with these boats and this is just the beginning. Good luck to all who continue "



    Patricia Brochard, Co-President of Sodebo:

    "The priority is above all in the safety of men and the boat. We made this decision by mutual agreement with Thomas and all his team to whom we give our full support.
    I want to congratulate them for their mobilization both at sea and on land. Thomas and Jean-Luc gave us a great race. I also thank Martin who allowed us to live this adventure with them.
    It is inevitably a regret to have to give up but the rest of the program promises to be beautiful. We are only at the beginning of the adventure Sodebo Ultim 3 and we know it at Sodebo, it is on the duration that write the beautiful stories ... "
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  7. #27
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Choosing The Right Route



    After nearly three weeks at sea, the three trimarans still racing on "Brest Atlantiques" continue their progression towards the equator, which they should cross Thursday. But while so far, all of them followed quite similar routes, the trimaran MACIF has opted since Sunday for a path full west, which François Gabart and Gwénolé Gahinet hope to make the fruits by the end of the week.

    The cogitation is at its peak right now aboard the three trimarans of "Brest Atlantiques", which continue their ascent of the South Atlantic, but also in the heads of their respective routers, Marcel Van Triest for the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Christian Dumard for Actual Leader and Jean-Yves Bernot for the MACIF trimaran. A trimaran MACIF aboard which François Gabart and Gwénolé Gahinet have indeed chosen since Sunday to stand out from their little playmates following a path full west, 90 degrees from the direct route which, if it does not translate to the not in the standings (650 miles behind the first, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Monday at 16h), could eventually pay off.




    TRACKER

    In a video sent by Jérémie Eloy, the media man on board, the two skippers explained their choice: "Two options have emerged: one taken by our two competitors, which is to leave almost full north downwind in the wind rather weak, and a second which is to cross a ridge in the prolongation of the anticyclone, to fetch a front, namely a zone of wind a little stronger. The idea is to cross this front and win in the west to then recover the trade wind with a better angle. "

    François Gabart and Gwénolé Gahinet have therefore chosen this second option which, for the first, has advantages: "It is a trajectory that seems faster, a little more complicated too, with a lot of maneuvers, changes in sails, three transitions in weak wind to manage. But whoever tries nothing has nothing, and on paper, it seems to be better. Since the departure of Brest, we have rarely had big strategic options very different, it has always been a little closed, this is the first time we really change philosophy and we place ourselves differently compared to a system weather. It's interesting, it's gameplay and a little more suspense. "

    Aboard the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, which has, at 16h, 245 miles ahead of Actual Leader (Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella), launched in an outboard west, we follow closely the road followed by the trimaran MACIF, as confirmed by Franck Cammas to media man Yann Riou: "We saw MACIF gyber (to jibe) and go to the south-west. Obviously, he's taking a completely different option from the one everybody seems to have been following for a few days, because there's a 1000-mile front of our growing area, with wind behind him. South West. One of the models actually gives this optimum route, namely to pass through this front and make a round on the other side, it's not going to be a very simple road, there will be work for them. "

    And the Aixois to add, about a possible shift in the trajectory of Maxi Edmond de Rothschild related to the MACIF option: "It does not change anything for us, we are not in the same places, not in same time, our optimal route is not the same, in any case, it is not worth taking their option by going to the southwest. » Results of the races by the end of the week ...











    While it was thought Sunday that the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild would find high average speeds in the second half of its ascent of the South Atlantic, it was finally slowed down in weak and unstable winds (8-15 knots) which did not really allow him to lengthen the stride.

    The leadership of the duo Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier is not actually really threatened, since if Actual Leader (Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella) remains within range (197 miles at 8am), he will have to recalibrate to west at a time to aim for nearly the same point of entry into the Doldrums, probably at about 25 ° West longitude.

    For its part, the MACIF trimaran (François Gabart / Gwénolé Gahinet) follows a very southerly route towards the Brazilian coast, which explains why its delay is becoming more and more important on the head of the fleet (576 miles compared to Maxi Edmond de Rothschild at 8am), he should in the coming hours cross a front with a little wind, remains to know whether he will then continue to go west or back to the equator.

    The equator where the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild is expected in three days, Thursday, November 28, the continuation and end of the program in the northern hemisphere, once the Doldrums crossed, announcing itself quite favorable for him, according to Christian Dumard, weather consultant of the race direction: "Franck and Charles should bypass the Azores anticyclone not too far in the west to get a depression that should allow them to finish in a flow of South. "









    Here is the word of the board sent this Sunday, November 24 by Ronan Gladu, media man on Actual Leader.

    "A nice day to" eat the mile ", straight to Brest, via the island of St. Helena.As Yves said," we must enjoy it, because it will not last! "Indeed, we are moving inexorably to the "soft", the weak wind, with many transitions, until the Doldrums, which also looks very thick.The fleet is tightening so it's not over with a Macif ambush behind us !

    The first "crystal ball" routes have fallen. And it's not easy in the North Atlantic. Either we bypass the Azores anticyclone almost to Newfoundland, to hang a depression to the point Brittany (estimate: 15 days!). Either we cross the Azores anticyclone to the east, upwind for long days (estimate: 13 days). Mrs. Irma announces an arrival between December 6 and 9 in Brest itself.

    Morale is good on board: to have fun, Yves & Alex take turns at the helm, happy like anything! My laugh of the day is Alex garden, when the wind rises: indeed, Yves had a mini-shower installed on the deck (a salt water pipe). However, there is so much pressure in the plays, that during long edges like this, the ends crash and dry on the winches. And, at the moment of shock, nothing happens ...

    Yves to comment " there are many who have put on the roof like that" . To remedy this, it is necessary to re-humidify the turns of ends on the winches. Often with the means of the edge, that is to say the gourd. But thanks to Yves' deck shower, Alex takes pleasure in "watering his plants", whistling with his pipe: "and a little for the green plant" (listening to GV), "and for the red" (listening to J2), "and for the yellow" (listening to J0) ... Promised , next watering, I film the scene, but there I was so stupid to laugh, I did not succeed!

    Good evening everyone and very, very fast! "








    While there is still a little more than 4000 miles to go to Brest, the fleet of three trimarans racing on "Brest Atlantiques" continues its progression north in the middle of the South Atlantic, in an unstable trade wind which forces the crews to maneuver a lot. At the top, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild is retensioning the elastic in his favor.

    Since Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier crossed the course mark of Robben Island, off the Cape last Wednesday, we can not say they spared themselves: twelve gybes along the African coast to get around, by the way. is, the St. Helena anticyclone, eight more in its north to do what the meteorologists call a "seagull wing" and go recover the trade wind of the southern hemisphere, the two skippers of Maxi Edmond de Rothschild must now perfectly master this maneuver that consists of going from one edge to another when the wind comes from the back of the boat.

    And it is probably not over, especially as the trade wind is particularly unstable in the middle of the South Atlantic, especially in the direction, even if, since last night, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild now follows a straight path close to the direct road, heading northwest, and found speeds in line with its potential, an average of 30.6 knots between the Sunday rankings from 12 noon to 4 pm. The magnificent drone images shot by the media man Yann Riou attest to this: the trimaran designed by Guillaume Verdier (with the Gitana Team's design office) has returned to flying mode!

    Expected consequence: the advance of the leaders is widening again on their pursuers, Actual Leader (Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella) and the trimaran MACIF (François Gabart / Gwénolé Gahinet) being pointed at 16h to respectively 188 and 253 miles of Maxi Edmond of Rothschild. Aboard the three boats, the time is now for strategic reflection to find the best possible route to the equator and then to a point of entry of the Doldrums which seems much more to the east in the sense of the climb than it was in that of the descent. "They do not have to go west, there is a possible road near Cape Verde, so a passage from Pot-au-Noir to the east," confirms the weather consultant. Race Direction, Christian Dumard.

    To note that less than two days after its abandonment, Sodebo Ultim 3 resumed the sea Sunday, heading to Brittany, Thomas Coville having entrusted in a video of thanks sent by the media man Martin Keruzoré: "We did not want to finish on a bad note, it was not the project to stop permanently in Cape Town, unfortunately, it stops here, but it was a great adventure on a new boat that will definitely be in the game. "
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  8. #28
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Dodging Equatorial Wind Vacuums



    TRACKER

    After three weeks of racing on "Brest Atlantiques", the days are similar and similar for the two leading boats, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild and Actual Leader, which are progressing at moderate speed towards the equator. For its part, the trimaran MACIF, left Sunday in the west, is preparing to accelerate and probably to regain ground to its competitors. It remains to be seen how much ...











    After a crossing Rio-Cape Rich in twists and a rise of the Namibian coast which will have offered to those who have approached unforgettable images, to put in the "best of" their logbooks, a certain monotony s' has been installed on "Brest Atlantiques" since Sunday. Especially for the two boats in the first two places, Maxi Edmond de Rothschild (Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier) and Actual Leader (Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella), whose northward progression is slowed down by weak winds (8 -10 average knots), hence speeds quite unusual for these racehorses (16.7 knots average 24 hours for the first, 9.6 for the second, pointed at 415 miles of his rival this Tuesday at 16h).

    In his message of the day, Actual Leader's media man, Ronan Gladu, does not hide a certain desire to finish off as quickly as possible with this Atlantic ax: " We are bypassing the Sainte-Marie anticyclone. Helena from the north is hard work. The weather files are uniform and give 10-12 knots of wind throughout the area, but on the ground, it's different: very unstable. The wind is often weaker than expected, especially in the "soft", suddenly, under some clouds, we find ourselves in air holes, where there is only 2-3 knots of wind. And the nonsense is already not "fun" on a sailboat on a human scale, but then on an Ultim! We still have a minimum of 48 hours to go on like this. "







    "It's monotonous, yes, recognizes Franck Cammas in a video shot by the media man Yann Riou , but sometimes it's good to have days without maneuvers, where you can check the boat and tinker before attack the northern hemisphere. It is true that the equator seems long to cross, but at the same time, we come from far away, from Cape Town, it is not the door next door. " Maxi Edmond de Rothschild However jibe in the morning for an edge to Brazil to position itself with the best possible angle relative to the southeast trade winds and ended, finally, good speed, the climb to the equator.

    Except big rebound, it should cross in front of trimaran MACIF which, for its part, will cross in the coming hours a not very active front, behind which it will find winds of south, then of south-east, which will allow him also d 'bend its course to the north and start a cavalcade reaching (crosswind), with the hope, shared by his two skippers, to return, if not on the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, at least on Actual Leader. " When we look at the progress of Actual, we see that they are a little slower than we had imagined, it is rather a good thing," said Gwénolé Gahinet to the media man Jérémie Eloy, François Gabart added: "We are moving faster than the routes, it's pretty cool. " And that will make the next days thrilling ...









    Here is the word of the board sent this Tuesday, November 26 by Ronan Gladu, media man aboard Actual Leader, which continues its recovery towards the equator.

    "We're going around the St. Helena High by the north, and it's hard work, but it's hard for me to move so slowly, and sometimes in the wrong direction." But Yves and Alex are serene : "We knew what we were getting into " by choosing this route.
    And it's a new adventure, this road! The weather files are uniform and give 10-12 knots of wind throughout the area. But on the ground, it's different: very unstable. In Brittany, during a depression, I often experienced, between forecasts and reality, the wind is often stronger, especially in laughter. In fact, in an anticyclone, it is the exact opposite: the wind is often weaker than expected, especially in "soft". So, under some clouds, we find ourselves in air holes, where there is only 2-3 knots of wind.

    And the nonsense is already not "fun" on a sailboat on a human scale, but then on an Ultim ...! Between hulls that hit, as dead, under the effect of the swell, but especially composite sails of more than 300 kilos each which faseyent: it is the horror! Fortunately, the slightest breath of air revives the machine, with the mast that rises to 37m high! All the appendages that can be removed from the water are raised, and we have an average of 8 knots of wind, which makes us evolve from 5 to 18 knots of speed, but not always in the right direction!

    Since the weather no longer reflects the reality of the body of water, as most of the indicators of wind on board, Yves and Alex block a lot by observing the water and sails, the old! The sea, each cloud, is analyzed by the experience of the sailors. In these conditions, with the repetitions that accumulate, they jibe like on a Hobie 16! A real choreography, to look for the slightest laugh. But they need to be two to maneuver, which is not easy, given the pace of gybes!

    We still have a minimum of 48 hours to go on like this. Meanwhile, Macif flies west. Who will win in this fight against the anticyclone? Gitana, it's obvious: they will not be long in getting back into the trade winds: it will hurt! In any case on Actual Leader, the long-term fight continues, the guys do not let go: each breath of wind is exploited to its fullest! "

    https://www.brestatlantiques.com/
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  9. #29
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Macif Stops The Bleeding


    TRACKER

    If the passage of the equator gets closer to the leader of "Brest Atlantiques", the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, expected in the northern hemisphere next night, the three trimarans continue this Wednesday to make a route to the west to go look for a trade wind finally well oriented and established.

    With regard to the cartography of "Brest Atlantiques", it is difficult to believe that the three boats still in the race have for final destination Brest. They all point their bows towards the west and Brazil, 90 degrees from the direct route to Brittany, whose leader, Maxi Edmond de Rothschild (Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier), is 3200 miles away this Wednesday after -midday. For the latter, who should cross the equator next night, it is best position to cross the Doldrums without taking the slightest risk (the more we go to the west, the less active it is) , but also to place between the trimaran MACIF (François Gabart / Gwénolé Gahinet), located 850 miles in its south, and the arrival in Brest, so to mark it.








    A MACIF trimaran which, it was planned, crossed a front last night, as Gwénolé Gahinet said at mid-day: "The night was hectic with a passage in front, a lot of work positioning weather and a sail change. Last night, we were approaching the cold front with a north / northwesterly wind pushing up to 22-23 knots, which allowed us to remain high mainsail and J2 to cross it. The crossing was marked by a very fast turn to the left: 140 ° in 20 minutes, fortunately with a rather weak wind force. The wind quickly established in the south, which allowed us to reach good speeds and a good edge that finally brings us closer to Brest! "

    Finally not quite, since the trimaran MACIF continued Wednesday to make a route to Rio, although it should not be too early to jibe to attack a long tacky tack tack (from the right) equator. "The goal now is to shift in the west and to jibe this afternoon to avoid the weak wind associated with the end of the front," confirmed Gwénolé Gahinet.

    For its part, Actual Leader, positioned in the middle of the South Atlantic, roughly equidistant from the African and South American continents, continues to progress towards the north-west, returning with speeds higher than 20 knots after two days in slow motion. And if the gap separating it from the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild has narrowed in the day (322 miles to 16h), the elastic band should quickly reel in favor of the latter when he gybes and accelerated to the north, while that the duo Yves Le Blévec / Alex Pella will have to finish going up the South Atlantic in staircase, with a less favorable angle of wind to go fast. It remains to be seen if Actual leader will manage to keep his second place of the covetous trimaran MACIF. Answer to the next episode ...








    Launched since Sunday in a strategy to the west different from its competitors, which, at first, proved costly in miles lost (up to 912 miles behind the Max Edmond de Rothschild, Tuesday at 16h), the trimaran MACIF is touching the first fruits of this option: after crossing a not very active front around midnight, it began to recover a little speed (22.1 knots over four hours between 4 and 8h) in a southerly wind a few fifteen knots that allowed François Gabart and Gwénolé Gahinet to begin to pick up miles on their predecessors.

    In the 8h standings, the two MACIF skippers are 860 miles behind the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild (Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier) and 475 on Actual Leader (Yves Le Blevec / Alex Pella) who, for two days, is struggling in weak winds that do not advance (12.3 knots average over the last four hours). Unlike the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild who, while recalient to the west to the northeast of Brazil, gradually sees his speed increase in a trade wind that finally becomes consistent.

    Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier are expected to do a little more westerly on Wednesday before jibing and cutting the equator, 200 miles to their north this morning, next night, and then crossing the Pot- au-noir, next hurdle on their way to Brest.

    Photo: Jérémie Eloy / Macif





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  10. #30
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    Macif And Actual Leader Battle For 2nd


    TRACKER




    If the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild now seems on track to arrive first in Brest next Wednesday, the battle for second place is raging between the MACIF trimaran and Actual Leader, separated by only thirty miles Sunday. The duel should last until Brest.

    Leading the "Brest Atlantiques" since November 14, the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, pointed Sunday at a little more than 1500 miles from the finish, should finish in three days with his great Atlantic, Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier being expected in Brest Wednesday morning at the earliest, in the afternoon at the latest. "They will progress behind the anticyclone that goes back to Europe, they will never have too much wind until the end, maximum 20-22 knots, with a flow of south which will then pass to the east, they are ideal conditions to finish " , analyzes Christian Dumard, the weather consultant of the race management.

    With more than 800 miles ahead of their pursuers, more than half of the road they have to go, the two skippers of the trimaran five arrows should be able, once the archipelago of the Azores reached Monday, manage in their hand the last 1000 miles on a direct route to Brittany, by making the most of a boat that will have covered the equivalent of two-thirds of a world tour.









    Behind, the fight for second place promises to be fierce until the end between the trimaran MACIF and Actual Leader who, since Saturday, make a road to the northwest: "They will fetch the following weather system, going to make the tower very west of the next anticyclone moving east, they will make a nice curve, but not necessarily go up very north, " says Christian Dumard.

    Who sees the two boats in contact at the beginning of the week: "MACIF will arrive first south of the anticyclonic bubble, it will strongly slow down Monday and Tuesday, so it will tighten between them, I think they will be very close to each other in two days, it is possible that they see each other at a time. " The race should last up to Brest, where both" Ultim "are expected between Friday and Saturday, the question is in what order.










    Here is the word sent on Saturday night by Ronan Gladu, media man aboard Actual Leader.

    "Sorry for the selfie ... I forgot to smile again: if only I was multitasking!"
    We were very proud of our journey in the Southern Hemisphere and to have reclined in front of Macif. a score, in the middle of the night ... Very quickly, the speed differentials between the two boats hurt: we feel that at Macif, they have nothing to lose! The balance is still super positive: a direct route, It was more tranquil for the boat, but especially for the sailors, so it was in pursuit of Macif that we engaged in the nightmare.

    Fortunately, he was much less violent and long than going. A lot of lightning around us, all night and a succession of grains, but rather softening. Nothing to do with the monsters at 40 knots in gust of the descent. But Yves & Alex still had to stay focused all night, on the tracks and listening. They have hardly slept. Since this morning, we have been ejected on the other side, in the North Atlantic.

    We are upwind in 15-18 knots of wind and we are moving between 25 and 30 knots of speed! Wind machines these boats! But at the price of total discomfort, which we had almost forgotten. So it goes again for the "salt fogger", evolution on all fours in the boat, permanent humidity, everywhere. There is a lot of Sargassum at sea, fortunately not huge heaps, just long lines in the trade wind. The foil and rudders, launched at this speed, have nothing to do with it!

    Routings give very different trajectories, with for some a big bypass to the west and an arrival via Ireland! But all give a timing of arrival in Brest next weekend, in a week. The atmosphere is always on top, despite fatigue, weariness and the return of "animal life". We will start counting the days: we thought to make a calendar of the advent, but with lyophilized well disgusting, instead of chocolate! In any case, good weekend to all, here we are always thoroughly! "
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