Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: 2020 Cape 2 Rio Update

  1. #11
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    1,400 2 Go In Cape2Rio For Leaders



    TRACKER



    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 11 Report
    By Richard Crockett

    Something the landlubbers following this race may not know about ocean racing is that outside assistance is simply not permitted and at its worst can be punishable by disqualification, or with a time penalty at the finish. So the crews out there are self-sufficient – or better yet, have to be self-sufficient in absolutely every respect from victuals to water and even navigation.

    If one receives water from a passing vessel, penalties can apply, and should one receive weather and navigation information from a source that is not available publicly, the consequences can be dire.

    So life on board is not all about beer and bikinis, but about managing the boat and its systems, the resources aboard, sailing hard and fast ALL the time by trimming and changing sails, and looking at the clues nature provides to “route” the yacht along the fastest possible course. So life is always busy on board.

    In the northern fleet the big dogs, ‘Maserati’ and ‘Love Water’, continue at great speed, pointing almost at the finish line and plotting their way through a potentially tricky period where the wind pressure may well drop, before they can break through to new wind, put on the afterburners and rocket towards the finish line, which is now less than 1800nm away.

    ‘Sulanga’, who had led the way since the first start until the trimarans passed her today, has done well and sailed fast since the start, and has been a moving target for the monohulls chasing her.

    The trio of ‘JM Busha 54′, ‘Mojie 1′ and ‘Umoya’ continue to look good in terms of line honours position and boatspeed, but only for now, and will have to box clever so as not to fall into a windless hole that may trip them up in a few days time.

    Down south in the southern fleet ‘Mussulo 40′ still wears the monohull leaders crown, although ‘Saravah’ has had a good last 24 hours. ‘Mussulo’ is the most northern boat of this fleet, and looks to be in a handy position with good wind prospects for the next 24 hours. As stated yesterday, ‘Zulu Girl’ may well be ploughing blindly along on a westward course towards light wind. Her fall from a top position on line honours has been dramatic of late, although she still hangs on to a podium place on handicap.

    ‘Mussulo 40′ and ‘Ballyhoo Too’ are being sailed just two-up, and are doing exceptionally well. The purists may point out that they have less weight on board in terms of victuals, water, crew gear and crew weight making them lighter than their competitors, but just two people are doing all the work that six and more are doing on other boats.
    While the whole northern fleet has crossed the meridian and is now in the west, the southern fleet have that as their next milestone – approximately 150nm away.

    There’s still lots to play for, many obstacles for the unprepared and opportunities available for those who can recognise and take them!

    ********************************


    Adriana:
    Good wind today
    Best regards

    Anjo:
    the hunt for the trades and how to sail them is in full force: Kite up = kite down; code Zero up = code zero down: pole the kite – fly it free manamana do duuu doo duudo all well with team Anjo on this happy yacht heading westish

    Ballyhoo Too:

    The trip so far has been amazing, pretty tough at times, but thrilling and some periods of the most pleasurable sail I have ever had. In the right conditions, ballyhoo is a real joy to sail. No time for reading, just sailing, eating, boat work and sleeping. The first 3 days were pretty stressful, mostly at night, it’s pitch black until the moon rises at around 12 and the wind generally doubles in strength. We are now very conservative at night and take down the spinnaker before dark and put in a reef.

    Conditions have been much lighter in the last two days and the daytimes have been amazing. Code 0 up now in light breeze and chomping towards the West. The wind is predicted to come up tonight, I reckon around 30knts, maybe 35, based on previous forecasts and what actually happens. we will put in 2 reefs and the no 4 jib and run down wind with it, it will be uncomfortable and unpleasant, but fine. No4 is already on deck and we hoisted it this morning to make sure it will be all good. We both wear our harnesses all the time at night or if the wind is up, don’t worry!

    the autopilot repair seems good and we have been using it, but we mostly hand steer not to over stress it and it is much faster to hand steer in the conditions we have had. Feeling pretty well used, but good.

    The food has been so good, the Ammy meals are incredible. And the other food is great, huge hunks of salami, fruit, cheeses, great coffee….what more could you ask for?

    Love Water:

    ALL GOOD ONBOARD

    MAZ IN SIGHT 5NM AWAY ON PORT BEAM. WILL BE A MATCH RACE TO RIO WITH 1500NM TO GO.

    Mojie:
    We have repaired our Big Bertha spinnaker again – this time the clew. We were passed astern by Ciao Bella at 05h30 this morning. They even radioed in and we had some good banter as we conceded short term defeat. Well done, Ciao Bella. Mojie Manne are always gracious in defeat, but this race ain’t over yet!

    Mussulo 40 – Team Angola Cables:
    Everything Ok!
    regards
    Jose

    Myrtle of Bonnievale:

    Cloud cover = 30%, Temperature: 26,3 deg C, Water temperature: 25,9 deg C, Barometer: 1023, Wind from: 130 deg, Wind strength: 17 knots.

    Last night was very dark. One could not see the difference between the shy and the ocean. You felt as if you are drifting in the sky. I dreamt a few nights ago that we are sailing around the moon.

    For the past week we haven’t seen any other yachts or ships. We can determine by the position reports that the other boats are in our vicinity but they’re approximately 30nm away while we can only see to about 8nm.

    A good friend from Pretoria – I think, Hugo Burger, asked what sort of coal PK and Pietman are using to drive the steam train because it seems to be the right sort whereas Eskom is apparently using the wrong variety.

    Drs Willem en Hilde Liebenberg from Bonnievale made us nice cards with motivational quotes for every day. Because we all sleep and work at different times of the day, Sonja decided to stick these on the wall on a daily basis. Now everyone can read them in their own time. While I sit here typing and look up to plan my next sentence, I read: “He restrains the waves of the sea.” This is from Job. Would he have also sailed? Must be because he realised that man needed that reassurance when the waves sounded like trains! Hansie told us that he and Dr Jakkie di Preez took a little something and prayed for us. Thank you gentlemen – one realises here how infinitely small you are against the huge ocean and nature.



    Love to all. Also to our fellow competitors on this voyage. Also to Love Water and Maserati – not because they deserve it but only out of grace.

    Pierre Albertyn

    Northern Light:
    New fishing buoys with presumably long lines attached

    Ronin:
    Been giving bread making lessons here. Great, now i am getting loads of sleep, and bread.

    Saravah:

    Yesterday an important tactical decision was made, and you may already be able to see it on the tracker but it’s result should appear only in 3 or 4 days. We had lighter winds for the past 24hs (as expected) but already found some good wind and are expecting a lot more for tonight. It’s a chess game out here, and we are only allowed to see the position of our competition once a day.

    Lots of work onboard, not only sailing the boat as fast as possible, but also doing the maintenance that such a long sailing demands. We have been sailing for 5 days on port tack with the spinnaker up all the time, and have switched kites at least twice daily, sometimes 4 or 5 times!

    Everything is working very well onboard, with the boat and the crew. Sailing conditions are really amazing. Blues skies almost all day long, and starry nights for most of the time. Everyone should try this race!

    Saravah!

    THESE RESULTS ARE PREDICTED OR PROVISIONAL








    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  2. #12
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    Cape2Rio Jan 17: Rio On Horizon For Leaders, Gourmet Food For Others Further Aft


    TRACKER


    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 12 Report
    By Richard Crockett

    Was it a surprise to see the big dogs dive south so dramatically? Probably not as one has to really keep one eye on the tracker and another on the weather. Those who toggle the wind on in YB Tracker will see that ‘Maserati’ and ‘Love Water’ are diving south into some big wind which they hope will slingshot them into Rio at record pace.

    The fact that the two big dogs are shadowing each other, with ‘Love Water’ just some 18nm directly astern of ‘Maserati’, shows that they have both seen the same wind pattern and both want to take advantage of it. Neither are doing massive boat speeds either, around 15 knots, and not the 25-plus that they are very capable of. That was on the 06h00 report this morning, although the 10h00 report shows ‘Love Water’ trying to position herself between Rio and ‘Maserati’. The next 24 hours will be very interesting in this two-boat tussle.

    The north-south fleet divide is closing daily, and within a few days we should see them begin to integrate more.
    What interests me is that ‘JM Busha 54′ have steadfastly remained the most northerly boat in the fleet, but this morning at about 07h00 she and ‘Mojie’ crossed gybes about 2nm apart, with ‘Mojie’ favouring a more northerly course of 308 degrees, and ‘JM Busha 54′ an almost south westerly course of 264 degrees. These two have been close foes all race, and are likely to be all the way to the finish line unless now is the time they unshackle from each other and one can outfox the other. As always, time will tell.

    ‘Mussulo’, in the southern fleet, continues to lead the fleet overall on handicap – especially impressive as they are sailing just two-up – that’s just two guys doing EVERYTHING!

    ‘Haspa Hamburg’ is the most northerly of this fleet, and sailing hard, fast and sensibly, as is ‘Almagores II’, with ‘Zulu Girl’ being the most southern boat in the entire fleet.



    Of the three cruising cats, ‘Myrtle of Bonnievale’ is in charge on handicap, followed by ‘Sulanga’ and ‘Ronin’.
    Yesterday I mentioned that no outside assistance was permitted in terms of the rules. Today, after questions from landlubbers about food, it’s safe to say that there are two categories of food intake on this race. The racing boats, and I mean those serious about wanting to win on handicap, will be eating freeze-dried food. It’s simply a case of opening a few packets of the chosen “taste of the day”, adding hot water and scoffing! It’s lightweight stuff this – as the lighter a boat is the faster it can go. Plus energy bars and lightweight snacks are plentiful – and chocolate bars too.

    *******************************************


    News from the fleet:


    (Messages are relayed as received)

    Adriana:
    to much pushing, material breaking, all well
    Corkscrew finally found
    Best regards

    Argonaut:
    Just broken the 4th spinnaker hailed but kite is ok

    Mojie:
    All is well, awesome sailing conditions! New speed record for Mojie of 17.8kts!

    Ciao Bella – JM BUSHA 54 SAILING TEAM:
    As we continue our tight race with Mojie we are super thankful to have a decent amount of wind! The racing is tight and this keeps us pushing hard. We have pancakes today to celebrate week 2 at sea.

    As I write this email, the radio went off and guess who it was… Yacht Mojie! So the tussle continues.

    Umoya:
    We see a big high pressure hole coming in front of us so deciding to head more south again. holding thumbs our strategy pays off!!




    Almagores II:
    (15 Jan) It’s hot, no clouds in the sky, the sun shines,the wind is round 11 kots, the sea is lowering to force 2.
    In the watch 12 am-2 pm, we see a group of killer whales, at the stern of the boat, too far to take a picture, but having seen them is huge. The night comes after a long sunset and with many clouds to cover the sky.
    The 8 pm-12pm watch starts in the dark, but towards the end the clouds disappeared and the stars are all over. At the end of the watch we gybe again, heading 345°,tws 9,boat speed 7


    Ballyhoo Too:
    we pretty extreme conditions at the moment, 30-35knts and a huge sea. So much water on deck my my PFD self inflated!Due to this I I may not have a chance to send a position report later today, as we have our hands full, but all good on board.Our position at 8:15 UTC 25 deg 57.304 S 003.58 w . Thanks Rijk.


    Anjo:
    very challenging times out here today- reefed and battened down tight – seems like a grand time to play spin the bottle down below – Hazelnuts and tea the call of the day- team ANJO remain upbeat if not just a tad wet. The night watch. As darkness slips across the charging seas, the horizon is snubbed out as are all signs of the moon or stars. It’s just blackness all around accompanied by the howling of the wind with guts up to force 8 through the sails. They in turn snap and whip like frenzied wild horses as the yacht dives down a massive wave, up the next and down again, fighting to broach. The only navigation displays are AWA which rolls relentlessly up and down as massive waves with breaking white water thunder past in the total blackness. Arms and shoulders scream out to stop spinning the wheeling in the vain attempt to steady the rolling numbers and it goes on and on, never seeming to stop until a shout to your left “unclip your hour is up, I’ll take over. The sweetest sound in the breakneck highway that is the Night Watch. TBC

    Love Water:
    ALL GOOD ONBOARD.
    HARD REACHING CONDITIONS BS [boat speed] AROUND THE 30KT MARK. LOTS OF SQUALLS AROUND. UNDER 1000NM TO RIO

    KEN



    Myrtle of Bonnievale:


    Boat speed 7-8 knots, surfing at 10 knots. Wind 20 knots from 120 Deg, Wave height = 3,5 meters, Outside temperature = 26.8 deg C, Water temperature = 25,9 deg C.

    Simone Balman, Race Secretary, is doing an excellent job to administer this race from Cape Town. Thank you Simone. Simone informed me that I give her a hard time to translate my Afrikaans messages to English. She then posts it on Facebook. Because there is some international following of the race, she has to post it in English. Apologies and I shall continue in English.

    My new friend and sailing guru, Bernard Farmer, says offshore races are won during the night. Bernard, I can also tell you that offshore races are lost at night. Today everyone on board looks like they are walking in there sleep from sleep deprivation. Pietman slept in an unconscious state this morning and we could not wake him up for his morning shift. Most did not sleep last night: sail changes, then the small spinnaker got torn in two, sails down, wind too strong for bigger spinnaker, jib still have some work to be done on, only option left was to hoist the handkerchief size storm jib to get some balance in the sail plan. We were limping at 5 knots until daylight when the wind calmed to allow us to hoist the bigger spinnaker again. Very glad non of the other competitors saw us with a storm jib where the spinnaker should be flying. We are racing again.

    I think I can safely say that we have crossed half the Atlantic ocean by now. We have had good wind this far. On previous crossings we were often becalmed and then stopped for a swim. No time for that this year. Part of the reason could be that we did not have any grib files on board before – the technology was too expensive at the time. By receiving grib files we can form a better idea of the weather system and where not to sail to.

    Everyone is happy and working hard.

    Love to all.

    Pierre Albertyn



    Ronin:
    Windy night and nice and fast. We need it now. Can’t wait to see Jesus

    Saravah:
    After crossing the lighter winds of the high pressure, we were blessed with stronger winds… but they came really stronger… 40 knots all of a sudden! With our spinnaker up, we had help from God when he slacked our halyard as a warning, just in time for us to lower the chute at the last light of the day, avoiding the strong gusts that came right after. Incredible!

    The night was dark and shaken with the wind averaging 30 knots and reaching 40 many times. Our skipper helmed the boat for 5 hours through the worst of the night. Now that the day is back, we can see the waves that reach 4 to 5 meters. Washing machine mode on! But we kept pressing the boat in a delicate balance between sailing fast and avoiding damage. Everything and everyone in great shape, despite the incessant movement that toss us from side to side.

    Saravah!







    On Board Maserati multi 70 we sail to 26.2 in the wake of Lovewater, which is about 40 miles later and goes to 26.5 knots.
    We're going with trinca and full mainsail with 20 knots of wide upwind. Lovewater, 10 feet longer than Maseratimulti70, is faster than us, but still 1000 miles left and we will fight until the end to resume the command!

    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  3. #13
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    Biting And Clawing Towards The Finish




    The all-consuming battle between Love Water and Maserati looks set to deliver its grand finale in the next 24 hours. It’s not over yet… and there are likely to be a few twists and turns yet, with notorious wind holes and tides on the final approach to Rio.

    It’s hard to pick a line honours winner, and it’s going to be a real scrap to the end, with neither boat giving a inch in their unwavering efforts to claim the race line honours record, which is looking to get about 2 days leaner!


    At 16 UTC, #LoveWater is still in the lead, 326 miles away from the finish line, but #MaseratiMulti70 is gaining ground and the distance from our competitor is decreasing, going down to 30 miles.
    We sailed 527 miles DMG in the last 24 hours, we set route to North-North-West shortly after 12 UTC and, at 16 UTC, we're sailing at 23.5 knots, while our opponent is going at 21.4 knots.
    The finish line is getting closer for us, 354 miles away from Rio de Janeiro: the tracking estimates our arrival for tomorrow morning (UTC).
    Everyone aboard #MaseratiMulti70 is fighting to overtake our rival, to conquer the victory in elapsed time, other than the one in corrected time: at the moment the tracking shows #MaseratiMulti70 at the top of the multihull leaderboard in corrected time, with 6 hours of advantage over #LoveWater.
    Forgive us for drawing so much focus to this duel, but to be fair, they will only be in the race for about a third of the time of the rest of the fleet, so there is plenty of time to enjoy all the stories in this incredible fleet.

    News from across the fleet has been of sublime sailing conditions, big mileage, personal best speeds, and careful management of boat, crew and systems.

    Ocean sailing takes a lot of careful preparation, ongoing preventative and corrective maintenance, plenty of forward planning of scenarios, and continuous troubleshooting. With the light winds earlier in the race, boats were communicating the need to start enforcing stricter rationing of provisions as a longer passage became likely. Management of fresh potable water is also a key priority, with JM Busha and Ronin reporting key water maker servicing and repairs. Mojie are experimenting with power management and power priorities, in response to their increased awareness of the isolation and independence of ocean sailing.

    Zulugirl have an issue with power regeneration with apparent engine alternator failure, but they do have solar panels aboard and Saravah reported communications with them when they crossed tracks. It’s important to know that the excellent YB tracker system runs independently from the boats’ power systems and has its own built in alert system. Also, all boats in the fleet are provided with a full fleet position report, which serves many purposes, but not least a solid basis for first responders should the need arise.

    Signing off for today, the #Sail4Good commitment of this fleet is so overwhelmingly positive, and I hope you are following and supporting these campaigns.

    *************************



    TRACKER


    Mojie:
    Lighter winds (10 knots) as we approach the high pressure system, and apart from further spinnaker repairs (all successful) and a misbehaving halyard, we are enjoying our sauna below deck. All ice supplies now depleted.

    Mussulo 40 – Team Angolan Cables:
    Everything Ok!
    regards
    Jose

    Myrtle of Bonnievale:
    We did too little miles last night. Rain for 3 hours, wind strengthened and we hoisted jib and spinnaker down. This morning confused sea with waves from 2 directions. At the moment the sea state has improved and flying spinnaker again in 22 knots of wind and sailing at 10 to 14 knots down waves.

    It is now also exactly 2 weeks ago when we set sail from Table bay. We are happy with our progress. Inge just got a splash of water when she tanned on the fore deck.

    Everyone is happy.

    Love to all.

    Pierre Albertyn

    Almagores II:
    January, 16th
    A day of passion,,, late in the afternoon the wind begsn to blow stronger and stronger and the sea to increase; at first we decide to drop off the gennaker, after a while we took the first reef at the main, a second reef a few later and, before midnight we drop off all the mainsail, gusts reach 45 knots,we sail only with the heavy jib.
    This morning the wind is still strong, but steady on 30 knots and with the 3 reefs at the main and the heavy jib, we can sail on big waves, higher than 5 meters.

    Even if the storm makes the boat roll, our young Nicole is able to cook for all the crew a fabulous PASTA AL PESTO!!!!

    Anjo:
    Team Anjo retires second main to pasture after storming winds during the night. One crew on light duties due to brushing and strained limbs after a gruelling hour up the mast in force 8/9 = all good manamana. Thoughts to the Viking hope he is recovering

    Indulgence:
    All well on Indulgence, celebrating Marcels bday today!! Coincidentally his birthday falls on South Atlantic’s National Biltong and Droëwors Day. Spirit still strong as usual and we having a ball 🙂 Good times and we do not want to wish the next two weeks past….…..and if you wondering why our coarse fluctuates between north and south, half the crew steers for the Caribbeann and the other half for Rio…

    Love Water:
    QUICK UPDATE:
    905 NM FROM RIO, SMOKING ALONG; 40NM AHEAD OF MAZ AND HOLDING OUR GROUND; THIS SHOULD BE THEIR CONDITIONS BUT WE ARE DRIVING THE BOAT HARD TRIMMING CONSTANTLY. THE MOTION THE LAST 48 HRS HAS BEEN A COMBINATION OF ROLLER COASTER, WASHING MACHINE WITH A BIT OF SHAKEN NOT STIRRED THROWN IN FOR GOOD MEASURE. GOOD PILATES WORKOUT; WE ARE CURRENTLY TIGHT REACHING AT ABOUT 25KTS IN A LUMPY SEA STATE.

    AT SOME POINT TONIGHT WE CROSS A FRONTAL SYSTEM – THINK WIND CHANGES IN SPEED AND DIRECTION, SEA STATE CHANGES AND ALL THE ASSOCIATED TRIM AND SAIL CHANGES WE NEED TO DO TO KEEP THIS LOVEWATER BEAST AT FULL PACE; AS IS ALWAYS THE CASE IT HAPPENS IN THE PITCH DARK WITH NO MOON. WE HOPE TO WORK OUR MAGIC THRU THE FRONT BEFORE THE MAZ TEAM. AFTER THE FRONT IS A BREEZY 24-36HRS DOWNWIND FLAT OUT SPEED SESSION TO RIO

    AT MOMENT WE HOPE TO ARRIVE SUNDAY MORNING. ALL GOOD ONBOARD AND THE TEAM IS LOOKING SURPRISINGLY STRONG FOR THE 6 DAYS OF HARD RACING ALREADY DONE.

    LOOKING FORWARD TO RIO AND TO GETTING DRY AGAIN.
    BEST TO ALL
    KEN

    14h15:
    400NM TO GO. BS 28-34 KTS AND NICE BREEZE.
    HARD MATCH RACE WITH MAZ WITH NO EASE UP IN EITHER TEAMS ENERGY.
    WE HAD A GOOD TRANSITION INTO THE NEW SYSTEM AT MIDNIGHT SAT MORNING WITH NO MOON OR STARS AND POURING RAIN. USED ALL OUR SAIL INVENTORY FOR THE TRANSITION EXCEPT THE STORM JIB. BOW TEAM WERE WARRIORS. NOW GYBING DOWNWIND TO RIO MATCH RACING THE MAZ TEAM.

    ETA EARLY SUN MORNING ALL THINGS GOING WELL.

    KEN

    Ronin:
    I think we are just following this big red bag. Seems to know the way.

    Saravah:

    Washing machine mode was on for more than 30 hours, as we encountered 4-5 m waves and strong winds, and had to take care of our equipment to avoid breakages. Last night the wind finally subsided and this morning we restarted to press the pedal to the metal with our spinnaker up.

    By 1am we crossed Zulu Girl just a few meters away, after almost 7 days sailing neck and neck! Amazing to have such tight competition! The position report from the other boats is the most awaited time of the day!

    Now we expect to keep sailing dead downwind for the next few days.

    Saravah!








    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  4. #14
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    The Big Tri's Finish Cape 2 Rio


    FLASH NEWS - January 19th, 2020

    Maserati Multi 70 and Giovanni Soldini cross the finish line of the Cape2Rio 2020

    The Italian Team concludes the race with an elapsed time of 8 days, 3 hours, 9 minutes and 34 seconds


    At 12.39 34” local time (15.39 34” UTC, 16.39 34” Italian time) on Sunday January 19th, Maserati Multi 70 crossed the finish line of the Cape2Rio 2020 off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Giovanni Soldini and his crew conclude the race with an elapsed time of 8 days, 3 hours, 9 minutes and 34 seconds.

    The Italian Team’s direct competitor, the 80’ trimaran LoveWater, arrived in Rio de Janeiro at 5.54 2” local time (8.54 2” UTC, 9.54 2” Italian time), with an elapsed time of 7 days, 20 hours, 24 minutes and 2 seconds.

    Aboard Maserati Multi 70, the skipper Giovanni Soldini raced with a 7-man crew: the Italians Guido Broggi (mainsail trimmer), John Elkann (helmsman and trimmer), Nico Malingri and Matteo Soldini (both grinders and trimmers), the Spanish Carlos Hernandez Robayna (trimmer) and Oliver Herrera Perez (bowman) and the French Pierre-Laurent Boullais.

    Maserati Multi 70 and LoveWater set sail for the 16th edition of the historical transoceanic regatta from Table Bay, before Cape Town, South Africa, on Saturday January 11th at 14.30 local time (12.30 UTC, 13.30 Italian time).



    The official times will be ratified later by the organizers of the race.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  5. #15
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    Maserati and Love Water's C2R Voyage Revisited



    Maserati Multi 70 and Giovanni Soldini cross the finish line of the Cape2Rio 2020

    The Italian Team finishes the race with an elapsed time of 8 days, 3 hours, 9 minutes and 34 seconds

    Giovanni Soldini: «It was a great and very hard fought race to the end»



    At 12.39 34” local time on Sunday, January 19th (15.39 34” UTC, 16.39 34” Italian time), Maserati Multi 70 crossed the finish line of the Cape2Rio 2020 off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Giovanni Soldini and his Team finished the race with an elapsed time of 8 days, 3 hours, 9 minutes and 34 seconds.

    The Italian Team’s direct competitor, the 80’ trimaran LoveWater, skippered by Craig Sutherland, crossed the finish line at 5.54 2” local time (8.54 2” UTC, 9.54 2” Italian time), with an elapsed time of 7 days, 20 hours, 24 minutes and 2 seconds, setting the new race record.




    all images © Alec Smith / Image Mundi





    Maserati Multi 70 and LoveWater set sail from Table Bay, before Cape Town, on Saturday January 11th at 14.30 local time (12.30 UTC, 13.30 Italian time), with a Westerly wind of 10-12 knots. The start wasn’t easy for the Italian trimaran: because of a problem with a pressure relief valve, the foil’s hydraulic pistons were subjected to excessive stress and, as soon as Maserati Multi 70 reached the second turning mark, they were damaged. Giovanni Soldini explained: "The pistons are used to adjust the rake, and therefore the foil’s upward thrust. We were able to make an emergency repair, using a rope system and some pieces of wood we recovered before setting sail, but every time we wanted to adjust the rake we had to stop the boat and manually move the foils, so it was difficult for us to make precise regulations and we lost a lot of time".



    After the incident, the Italian Team found ideal flying conditions and was able to overtake LoveWater at the end of the first night. The second day of the race got harder and the sea and wind conditions, with gusts up to 30 knots of tailwind and big waves, favoured LoveWater, 10 feet longer, which regained the advantage. Nonetheless Giovanni Soldini and his crew kept up the fight and, thanks to the tactical choice of “skipping” a gybe, they were able to catch up with their opponents and overtake them the following day.



    The two trimarans took the lead of the fleet that set sail from Cape Town on January 4th and set course to South, reaching the best stop to pass through the high pressure. Soldini explained: «We had almost 100 miles of advantage over our competitors, but the wind came from behind and played in their favour, so LoveWater caught up with us. After that the situation was hard, the waves were big and there were 20-25 knots of tailwind, ideal conditions for our opponent. We were able to achieve a nice speed anyway, up to 31 knots of average speed in 4 hours, and we reduced the distance between us and our competitors from 50 to 30 miles. At that point we were 14 miles away from Rio de Janeiro with no wind at all and we moved hardly at all for 6 hours, while LoveWater already crossed the finish line».










    "It was a really great and very hard fought race! Unfortunately it wasn’t an easy challenge, LoveWater is 10 feet longer than Maserati Multi 70, so in certain conditions it’s definitely faster, but we were able to stand up to them in multiple occasions. We’re very happy about Maserati Multi 70, which proved to be doing really well: we noticed that, with the new adjustments made after the studies with the engineers from the Maserati Innovation Lab, we were able to solve some problems that we had before and the boat now is much faster. We reached peaks of 38 knots of speed!"



    Aboard Maserati Multi 70, the skipper Giovanni Soldini raced with a 7-man crew: the Italians Guido Broggi (mainsail trimmer), John Elkann (helmsman and trimmer), Nico Malingri and Matteo Soldini (both grinders and trimmers), the Spanish Carlos Hernandez Robayna (trimmer) and Oliver Herrera Perez (bowman) and the French Pierre-Laurent Boullais.



    John Elkann, chairman of FCA, already sailed with Soldini numerous times and participated in many races, including two editions of the Transpac, in 2013 and in 2017. After crossing the finish line, he said: "We fought like lions since the start of the race, but we’ve had many difficulties. Giovanni Soldini and everyone in the crew are very skilled, thanks to that we were able to find a solution for every setback: to fix a problem with the central rudder, we used some pieces from the engine. It’s been fantastic to see how, in times of difficulty, it’s possible to achieve results with great perseverance while keeping the spirits up!"



    Born in 1971, organized by the Royal Cape Yacht Club and held every two or three years, the Cape2Rio is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest intercontinental yacht race, with a 3.600 nautical miles long course, and has always been a legendary event for every experienced sailor.

    The original course starts in Cape Town and arrives in Rio de Janeiro, but for some editions the finish line has been moved to other destinations: in the years of the anti-Apartheid protests the race finished in Punta del Este, Uruguay, and, in 2006 and 2009, in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  6. #16
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    Jan 21 Update: The Cape 2 Rio Fleet Muddles Along


    TRACKER


    Adriana:
    Received your information, we are dodging the storm and braaing fillet mignon and having a nice red wine. The chef is getting tired of cooking and menacing strike 😀
    Best regards

    Argonaut:
    Last night a petrel landed on our stern and sat there for a while before leaving us again. Some kind of big fish (possibly tuna) swam off with our lure after breaking the line. Currently we have been through every 30 seconds card of both adult and kids version!

    CFM2 – ZULU GIRL powered by MAZI:
    Good evening
    Family and friends
    We hope everyone is well.
    Conditions onboard have been good today we have light to moderate wind (around 10 -15 knots). our heading is on average about 300deg.It is probably the warmest day we’ve had (really wishing we could use our fans!)Food has been great thanks to Dan the Man. We are now setting up the boat for the next couple of days.

    Now with about a week left of the race it is time to be focused in terms of how we finish as the last 1300 miles is going to be very tactically challenging. we are very happy with where we are! If anyone chats to Mossulo let them know we are coming! ZuluGirl Powered By Mazi! PHEZKWABO!
    Siyanda Vato

    Mojie:
    Experienced consistent and moderate winds, and made good miles with our recently re-repaired S4 spinnaker. Initial night rain squalls were followed by a late rising, waning crescent moon and beautiful stars. We have used the good weather to check all our storm sails and prepare for the extreme weather that is forecast. We have just changed ship time to UTC – 2 hrs

    Mussulo 40 – Team Angolan Cables:
    Everything Ok!
    regards
    Jose

    Myrtle of Bonnievale:

    We had a good swim for 45 minutes when we stopped yesterday. Today Pietman has some ear infection, probably from the swimming and wind in the ear later. We hope it will clear up soon.

    PK and Lize is washing clothes today. The boat and everyone is happy.

    Cloud cover 30%, Outside temperature 28,3 C, Water temperature 28,3 deg C (seriously), Wave height 2 meter, Wind from 95 deg, Wind strength 14 knots, Barometer 1020.

    Love and good wishes to all from all aboard Myrtle.

    Pierre Albertyn

    Almagores II:
    The day of the race start, we weight and wrote each weight on a notebook.
    The idea was to check, if at the arrival in Rio we lost, gained or remained the same weight, but we didn’t know that Nicole and Massimo would have start to cook such a good things, for lunch and for dinner.

    Let me describe some of them.
    I could start telling you about fillet with pepper, or pasta with pesto sauce,or swordfish and tomatoes sauce,or, why not, about baciocco cake ( potatoes cake), but how can I forget to tell you of some cocoa cakes, chocolate and pears, or 4 pizzas cooked today for dinner?

    So now, what’s your opinion about our weight in Rio? I think that it will be easier to make us roll instead of walking, here we do not loose kilos, we add kilos….

    P.S. Do you remember that some days ago I wrote abouto someone on board seeing UFO in the middle of the night? Today wereceivedd a mail from a SAA pilot that saw our report about the UFO, he was the UFO, he is fond of racing, is following the Cape2Rio, and as he recognized the boat while flying above us, flashed with the landing lights and the wings lights. Mistery solved, a beautiful smile and a unique story to tell, thank you Richard!!!

    JANUARY,20th
    In these days the challenge is to find the right course to follow,as on Cabo Rio and Rio de Janeiro, is positioned an intense frontal system, with,on friday, sustained winds (34-40 knots) and swell around 5.5 meters with gusts greater than 50 knots.

    The safety team of the race Cape2Rio recommends to all the boats, to remain north of 20°S.
    Our skipper Andrea has the hard work to understand which is the best and safest way to reach Rio and how to start preparing the boat for this low. For sure we’ll keep the storm jib ready to be hoisted, the mainsail checked to be ready for a fast drop off.

    Tough days are expecting us…updates to follow.

    Anjo:
    greetings from the good ship Anjo. Seeking the elusive SE trades from 23 degrees up to 21 degrees as is the norm. Alas not this race and the navigator may just get his bum stewed in rum (as the sea shanty goes) if the best route to Rio was direct. All her no matter the time of day. Light winds remain the call of the day. Grrrrrrr

    Ronin:
    Just had a feast of bacon and eggs on fresh baked bread. Wind backing to east at last.😎

    Saravah:
    During the dark hours we had light winds and an amazing starry night. Also incredible is the quantity of satellites that we can see near the sunset and sunrise.

    Near dawn we sighted a navigation light straight ahead. At 9 GMT something fantastic happened: we passed SY Northern Light only 30m away, 17 days after they departed Cape Town! Such a huge Ocean sometimes becomes a small pond! We greeted each other without the need of a VHF. Their huge and beautiful white starred blue spinnaker was the theme of our pictures today.

    Now the wind is picking up and we are charging full speed towards the Brazilian coast. It’s pedal to the metal again!

    Those of you who think this is a straight line drag race without any strategy involved, this can’t be further from the truth. There is a huge low forming between us and the finish line. The best point to cross the system must be found keeping a delicate balance between sailing a longer course, avoiding the worst of it and preserving the equipment, or cutting the corner. But what happens after? The wind is supposed to die and change it’s direction completely around the clock. Who will get the new wind first? It’s a chess game out here, and we need to keep the pawns sailing fast. There is still a lot of race before the end!

    Saravah!








    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  7. #17
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    The Pack Zeros In On Rio After Tumultuous Weekend


    TRACKER


    The Cape 2 Rio fleet is approaching the finish after more than 3 weeks at sea and enduring Tropical Storm Kurumi

    Read the reports from the past several days:


    ****************************************

    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 18 Report
    By Luke Scott

    The Brazilian Navy, through the Navy Hydrography Center (CHM) and multiple collaborators, has issued a warning predicting the formation of a cyclone with possible subtropical characteristics, starting on the 23rd, when it may be classified as Subtropical Depression. The formation of the cyclone is associated with the establishment of a convergence zone over a region where the sea surface temperature is being observed between 26°C and 27°C. If the intensity of the observed winds reaches or exceeds 63 km / h (34 knots), the phenomenon will be reclassified as Subtropical Storm “Kurumí”, an expression in Tupi-Guarani that means “boy”.




    Predicted weather as at 14h00B, 24 Jan 2020. Positions as at 12h00B, 22 Jan.
    The probable area of formation of the subtropical cyclone will be on the high seas, between the north of the state of Rio de Janeiro and the south of the state of Espírito Santo, with displacement initially towards the south, affecting the weather and sea conditions between the states of Santa Catarina and Bahia, starting on the 23rd in the morning. Winds are expected with direction from Northeast to North and intensity up to 87 km / h (47 knots) on the high seas, between the state of Rio de Janeiro, north of Arraial do Cabo (RJ) and the state of Bahia, south Caravelas (BA), between the 23rd morning and the 25th. Winds are also expected with direction from Northeast to North and intensity up to 61 km / h (33 knots) on the high seas, in the state of Bahia, between cities of Caravelas (BA) and Ilhéus (BA), between the 23rd in the morning and the 25th.

    The winds may cause sea agitation resulting in direction waves from Southeast to East and height between 3.0 and 4.0 meters at sea, between the state of Santa Catarina, north of Laguna (SC) and the state of Rio de Janeiro, north of Arraial do Cabo (RJ). Maritime agitation is also expected resulting in direction waves from Northeast to North and height between 3.0 and 4.0 meters at sea, between the state of Rio de Janeiro, north of Arraial do Cabo (RJ) and the state from Bahia, south of Caravelas (BA), between the 23rd in the morning and the 25th.

    The development and deepening of the cyclone may reinforce the convergence of humidity over the DELTA and ECHO areas, causing large accumulations of rain over the coast of the state of Espírito Santo and the south of the state of Bahia and over the maritime area where the phenomenon operates.

    *********************************************


    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 19 Report
    By Richard Crockett

    The Race Committee has issued a further weather warning, which we will get to in detail after a brief synopsis of what’s happening out there in the South Atlantic. The fleet is beginning to batten down the hatches and prepare for the storm ahead.

    On the tracker one can already see the bad weather forming between the fleet and the finish.




    Taking the weather warnings very seriously is ‘Zulu Girl’ whose course has changed radically as she heads north towards latitude 20. This move has certainly cost her dearly as she has dropped to 4th overall on handicap. Her crew is young and planning well ahead and taking the advice offered in terms of the weather warning. One cannot win this race unless one finishes, so while her tactics right now may look detrimental to her overall position, she may well still come out of this okay.

    The southern fleet is pointing well north of Rio right now and hoping that their courses will take them over the top of the bad weather before they plan their final course for the finish.

    The northern fleet is deploying similar tactics, but don’t have to get in as much “northing”, and in fact some probably none, as their southern rivals. ‘Sulanga’ is the most northern boat by a long way, while ‘Mojie’ is taking similar action to ‘Zulu Girl’ with a definite north-look to her course.

    The Weather Advisory

    Further to the Race Committee Advisory issued at on 20/01/2020 the Brazilian Navy’s Diretoria De Hidrografia E Navegação has classified the low as a “Sub Tropical Depression”. The prognosis contained in the previous advisories from the Race Committee has been verified by professional meteorologists and oceanographers. Both ECMWF and GFS weather prediction models are in close agreement for the period in question.

    Prognosis & Definition: Sub Tropical Depression “Kurumi” with an extended front including secondary lows extending to the North. The system is driven by an upper atmospheric “cut-off” Low at the 500 hPa (5000m) level.

    Risks: Possible gusts in excess of 60 knots. Multiple swell directions with periods below 10 seconds leading to steep, breaking seas. Multiple current eddies with speeds up to 1 knot have been identified. Shallowing of the sea bed. Coastal effects, both in terms of wind and swell.

    Duration of risk: Thursday morning 23/01/2020 to Sunday morning 26/01/2020.

    Possible Area of risk: Area defined by 18S in the North (After Saturday afternoon 25/01/2020 20S could be used), 45W in the west, and 30W in the East for latitudes north of 25S. For latitudes south of 25S and north of 30S, 25W should be considered the Eastern boundary. South of 30S and north of 40S, 15W should be the Eastern boundary. It should be stressed that severe weather and sea conditions could be experienced outside these areas given possible forecast errors.

    Ilha Trinidade (20deg 31’S; 29deg 19’W approximately) offers anchorages to yachts electing to avoid the worst of the weather system. Details are charted.

    For Landlubbers – The Scenario of “Battening Down the Hatches”
    Up front, and without attempting to be dramatic in any way, it needs to be stated that these boats and crew have everything at their disposal on board, including a vast array of safety equipment, to deal with virtually every eventually during this race.

    I am pretty certain that all skippers will have taken this weather warning to heart by now, and will be preparing the boat and whole crew for it – well in advance of whatever comes their way. Below is for the landlubbers in the hope that they do not fear the worst, and understand that what is heading their way is all part and parcel of ocean racing.

    Much of what I say below is pretty standard practice, and would have been gone through in detail by the crew before departing on this race, but a refresher on board right now is prudent seamanship.

    Crew will be checking every single part of both the running and standing rigging, ie. sails, mast, stays, halyards, shackles and more. Any possible weak spots need to be identified now, before the bad weather, and rectified. Shackles will be tightened and re-wrapped with tape, split pins checked, chafe points identified and managed. All loose and unnecessary items on deck will be stowed or securely re-lashed.

    Down below all loose items will be stowed, the interior tidied, and everything made shipshape. The bilge pumps will be checked to ensure they are functioning properly and that nothing is, or could, block them should they take on water.

    Most importantly though, skippers will be engaging their crew and going through all the safety procedures and equipment aboard, and the responsibilities each person has in an emergency. Liferaft deployment is likely to be top of this briefing, How they will handle a man-overboard situation, where all the safety equipment is stowed, and how and when it will be used are all discussion topics. This includes flares and even the EPIRB – ALL JUST IN CASE.

    This may all sound very dramatic, and crews should know all of this instinctively, but good skippers will keep reinforcing and refreshing the crew on the procedures in case of breakage or worse. Right now, while still sailing hard and to win, crews will be encouraged to get as much rest as possible so as to be fresh when whatever is thrown at them can be handled in a seamanlike manner.

    Bad weather is not for sissies – and hopefully all boats and crew will come through unscathed and richer for the experience. Thanks to modern technology they have been given ample warning of what lies ahead, and have had time to prepare. More importantly, there are many highly competent seamen and women out there who will simply take this in their stride – and add it to their memories of ocean racing.

    ********************************************


    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 21 Report


    By Luke Scott

    JM Busha believe they are through the worst of the weather they’ve tackled in the last 24 hours, where they reported seeing 6m waves and very strong winds while running with the storm.

    The co-skippers Michaela and Ryan’s dad Michael sent the following message this morning: “News from the team is that they had a hard night, under reduced sail and encountering 6m swells. With daylight, they sailed out of the last of the really rough stuff and are now under 2 reefs and the storm jib heading more West. Tough bunch this team! Proud of them.”

    Haspa Hamburg, the JV52, are currently in the thick of it and interestingly approaching the heavy sea and winds more perpendicularly for now. Perhaps this is the advantage of the greater freeboards and waterline length, to get it over and done with as quickly as possible, but it’s going to be super uncomfortable aboard?

    Further north, the Class 40 double handers on Mussulo 40 are choosing a strategy somewhere in between the Haspa and JM Busha techniques. Their course may bear off further south as they encounter any deterioration in conditions, but they appear to be able to get through the worst of it in daylight today.

    Right up above 18°S, the 49’ catamaran Sulunga elected to ride out the worst of the storm hove-to and well north of it. Conservative and sound seamanship. With daylight, they appear to be back up to speed and pointing west!



    Mojie are now following a similar track to where JM BUSHA were about 21 hours ago, and should be in a favorable position to have options on how much south or west they want to make in daylight today. The storm is currently acting as predicted and the fleet further back should not have to deal with such extreme conditions, as they have sensibly made the effort to sail north west to avoid the worst of it.

    If you’ve followed the tracker – the frequency of which was bumped up to hourly for the duration of the storm – you will notice a number of different approaches were taken. Adriana, for example, have sought refuge behind an island; some boats slowed; all altered course.

    Boats like Zulu Girl and Almagores were well south a few days ago, and faced a proper KLAP! But they came north.
    To win a yacht race, you first need to finish! (Or is that the other way round?!)

    ***********************************************



    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 22 Report
    By Luke Scott





    Zulu Girl appear to have successfully passed through the local system in the top left corner of the screen.
    The storm has not yet passed for all of the fleet.
    There’s an interesting reality for all the enthusiastic followers of the highly addictive tracker for the race: it’s a one way ticket. We can watch the progress of the boats and feel like we’re virtually right there, but there is no way for us to know what’s happening in reality.

    A severe localized weather system – an embedded low – has brought extreme weather overnight, affecting the progress of Zulu Girl, who now appear to have successfully navigated through the storm, after presumably being hove-to for some time.

    Race Management has monitored this closely overnight and made the necessary bridges to relevant maritime safety and rescue authorities on both sides of the South Atlantic to be on alert.

    There are 3 more boats in the path of this localized storm, and we have communicated an additional advisory alert to these boats through the fleet communication channels.

    Another intriguing aspect is that the standard general weather models don’t really show the localised storm, but, for example, if you delve through additional layers on Windy, like “wind: gusts”, “waves” and the slide bar for wind at higher altitudes, this system of extreme weather is clear.


    **********************************************


    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 23 Report
    By Luke Scott

    Day 23 Report – Luke Scott

    Focus on board must be shifting from the sleepless nights focusing on preparation, safety and survival (routing; people management, sail and boat management, etc), the accurate execution in the midst of the storm; to mopping up and licking wounds; to aiming for the finish line and waiting for the puffs to come.

    Isn’t it ironic that there was such instant calm after the storm, as boat after boat parked up after their various transitions through Kurumí’s barbed and violently wagging tail?

    It’s great to see the stories starting to come through from the boats of their experiences and triumphs in handling themselves with enough skill, training and strength of character to conquer Kurumí and come through to the other side.


    Tracker


    We applaud every boat for your response to adversity… and a wide spectrum of responses were on display.

    And so to the point of this report today. This is a very special race, embraced and sailed by a very select, brave and group of people. Yes, they will come out the other side sun and wind beaten, hairy and salty; but their smiles will be different, their eyes will be different, their lives will be different. And they will be better for it.

    Over 63,000 virtual sailors entered Cape2Rio2020. It’s a great way to market and spread knowledge about the race, and I’m really pleased with the turnout (much bigger than the Sydney Hobart, for example), but the chances are that not one virtual skipper got wet, got ginger, felt the kiss of a warm wind across their cheeks, gazed across an ocean deep in thought.
    Cape2Rio2020 is real, and each of 136 souls aboard the 22 boats will have stories for life of the rich quality of experiences they’ve had: the adventure of a lifetime!

    And that is what this race is about: Quality. Quality, passion and possibility.

    Rio will welcome you with inimitable admiration of your achievements (and some ice cold adult beverages).

    Tracking of the boats will speed up to 2 hourly approx 40NM out and then to hourly 20NM from the finish. The race media channels will bring you updates from the finish line and dockside.

    We will monitor the progress of the 4 boats in this vicinity very closely today, and we will provide additional reporting of the reality on the water as experienced by the boats if/when this information becomes available.
    Positive thoughts.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  8. #18
    Note to self: Only do Cape2Rio on a boat that can get it done in a week or less!

  9. #19
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    10,825
    Blog Entries
    1

    A Flurry Of Finishers In Rio

    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 24 Report
    By Luke Scott



    What an amazing day full of finishers! A massive release of a spectrum of emotions from the sailors, families, friends and race supporters as the first five monohulls cross the finish line: Ciao Bella – JM BUSHA 54; Haspa Hamburg; Mussulo 40 Angola Cables; Almagores II & Mojie I.

    And although the final pecking order is far from decided, there are a number of “knowns” to draw from these finishers:
    Ciao Bella : start one monohull line honours, youngest skipper finished.
    Haspa Hamburg: start two monohull line honours
    Mussulo 40: first monohull doublehander to finish
    Almagores II: fourth monohull to cross the line, third of the start two boats. At 102 feet, the second largest boat ever in the Cape2Rio (there was a 115 foot boat entered in the first Cape to Rio Race in 1971)
    Mojie I: second monohull to finish of the start one fleet.









    There’s been a lot on the go here in Rio and time is at a premium, so the timing (and time zone difference) of this report is a little bit out of sync, but the incredible finish images will continue to come through as a host of boats finish in the next 24 hours, and the stories from the sailors on the dock will start to flow!

    We are going out shortly to finish the first catamaran, Sulanga, and then the local darlings on Saravah!
    With many boats now within close proximity to the South American continent, expect a full flow of finishers coming in the next few days, although the tricky winds between Cabo Frio appear to be doing what they do… so the boats that have finished will be pleased to have their “runs on the board”…








    Leaderboard – 29|01|2020
    News from the fleet:
    With 9 of the fleet now safely back in port in the shadow of Sugarloaf Mountain, the remaining 13 are eager to get to the finish line. (Messages are relayed as received)

    Adriana:
    Too much cooking, ran out of cooking gaz, still plenty of wine
    Best regards


    Almagores II:
    JANUARY, 28th
    We almost arrived at the end of this adventure, the coast of Brasil is downwind us,on board the mood is high. There are still 30 nm to go, more or less, the wind is light and we keep on gybing, to make a good reaching to Rio.
    Today, instead of telling about life on board, let me introduce you the crew that made my stories during these days and,above all,made the race, the first two are the men that did also the delivery of AlmagoresII, the others are all sailors coming from the same italian region, in particular from east Liguria, more in details from the Gulf of Tigullio:
    Glenn Edwards :The Tasmania n gentleman-Australia
    Jack Evans : The bearded-Australia
    Federico Borromeo : The boss – YCI Genova
    Francesco Donati : The captain – Chiavari
    Andrea Henriquet : The skipper – Chiavari
    Mario Marengo : The engeneer– Santa Margherita Ligure
    Adelaide Giromella : The blogger – Lavagna
    Mario Henriquet : The climber – Sestri Levante
    Andrea Meloni :The jolly – Lavagna
    Anne Soizic- Bertin : The breton-Chiavari
    Angelo Giuli Romanengo : The golden boy – Chiavari
    Massimo Muti : The bowman-Lavagna
    Nicole Moretti : The chef – Chiavari

    P.S. Our guest, Birdie,yesterday morning, after 15 hours of rest, during whose it shared the watches with all the crew, flyed away and we were all very happy.

    Argonaut:
    Position taken as at 1420. Sorry we forgot. Too distracted with trying to get to the finish line which is so close yet so far. Really hoping to make it today but unlikely. News update: there is eff all wind.

    Myrtle of Bonnievale:

    CLOSING IN TOWARDS FINISH LINE

    We are about 140 miles from the finish line. If we have enough wind, we could be finished by tomorrow at this time of day.

    Thank you to RCYC and ICRJ for hosting this amazing race.
    Thank you for all who followed us and supported us the past 3 weeks.
    Thank you to my crew who is amazing. Lize and Inge who did this first Atlantic crossing with us during a race situation. I am so proud of you – you did more than what was expected. Sonja – Man of the match – thank you – you are one of a kind. PK and Pietman, your brutal power, energy and agility made us a team to be reckoned with. I have not been on the foredeck for 3 weeks. You boys did everything, doing sail changes in record times. We just blew our second spinnaker into pieces (Simone, in Afrikaans we would have said the sail is now in its nut). We had several challenges and repairs to be done on route. PK did an amazing job to keep the boat together. He was almost always busy repairing stuff. PK worked full time for at least 2 months to service, repair or replace stuff in Cape Town. Thank you PK, I am so very proud of you all.

    I wish my son in law, Brett Strydom and my 2 daughters, Nelia and Maryke, and 3 grandsons, Kaleb, Ethan and Levi, could have been with us on this trip. Maybe next time?

    Love to all from all aboard.

    Pierre Albertyn

    Ronin:
    Wow, last day and still trucking along. Be there tomorrow😎
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •