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Thread: 2020 Cape 2 Rio Update

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    2020 Cape 2 Rio Update




    13 Boats departed Cape Town headed for RIO on Saturday as part of the 3435nm 2020 Cape 2 Rio race. 9 additional boats will depart January 11th, effectively giving the cruisers a week lead. Among the fast boats leaving will be Giovanni Soldini and the crew on the Mod 70 Maserati, hoping to eclipse their own record of 10D 11h 29m 57s set on the Volvo 70 Maserati in 2014. Als in the fast boat division is the Southern Wind 102' Almagores II with an Italian crew, a beautiful Farr designed cruiser with the waterline to set a monohull mark. The Judel Vrolijk 52' Haspa Hamburg
    has potential to corrected out ahead as does the double handed Mussulo 40, crewed by Jose Guilherme Mendes and Pereira Caldas...


    TRACKER




    Here are some reports from the fleet thus far:


    Jan 5th Reports

    Argonaut: Whale swam under under the boat. Lots of dolphins.
    Indulgence: Somewhat of a hectic start with our genoa sheet that came loose at the first marker followed by a dash of over enthusiasm at the second marker… but hey all good. As it is still the first day we are still settling in…. we’ll put on the “turbo’s” a bit later in race. Regards from the already warmer water.


    Myrtle of Bonnievale: Wonderful day of the start. Light wind. Excitement. Adrenalin rush. Slow sail up the coast. Then wind died at midnight. Jib up, jib down, spinnaker up, spinnaker down, mainsail up, mainsail down – speed stayed at 0.0 knots. then realised we are drifting back to Cape Town and lowered all sails. The morning brought a 7 knot breeze. We don’t complain because compared to the 2014 start where we had over 40 knots with rain the first night, this is heaven. Good day to all. Pierre Albertyn, Myrtle of Bonnievale Team

    Ronin: Greetings from Ronin. our 1400hr position as follows. 33.16.5s 017.21.0e. what a night. had zero steerage due to zero speed through the water.sometimes we were facing south drifting north at half a knot. all good onboard. we brought a huge lasagne on board and just having the last for lunch. chasing rotary scout who are currently 4.4 miles ahead of us. Cheers.
    *************************************


    January 6th

    Argonaut: Braaied springbok rump & sweet potatoes + carrot salad for dinner opened a bottle of springfield wholeberry last night. Flying along at 6 knots. Pls ask organizing committee to organize wind. Can see mojie still and many of the fleet on AIS. Saw some jelly fish. Rod out to catch fish – so far only caught a blue ribbon packet. Engine all sorted and happy. Generator running at the moment to heat up the geyser for a nice hot bath later. Spinnaker is up and flying since 0700 on the wrong halyard. Braaied boerie rolls 4 lunch. Engines are healthy. Played a game of cluedo.

    Ronin: Finally sailing downwind. Flying sym last 18 hours. Got the cob going be made a massive lunch. No freeze dried food here. Had lot of comms with rotary scout. out of range now though. They all sound fine.

    Sulanga: All well on board
    Umoya: Spinny is up today with easy SE blowing. Trucking nicely at 320T

    ************************************************** ********




    January 7th
    Argonaut: Saw Umoya off our starboard bow. Fixed bilge pump in anchor locker. Flying a baby kite whilst the ram kite dries off – it was in the anchor locker. Great fluorescents in the water last night. More great food and Braaiing

    Ronin: Had a great run last 24 hrs. 195 mm.Nice to have the sun out today but going a lot slower. Eating like kings still and every one up and chilling in the sunshine. Don’t think we are going to see another run like that again soon. Cheers from Ronin.

    Umoya: last night we hit 16.5kn with 20kn winds under a ridiculously bright starlit sky. now were moving to slower conditions. winds dropping a little and temperature is HOT!


    https://cape2rio2020.com/
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    Avoiding The South Atlantic High

    Cape2Rio2020 | Day 4 Report

    The classic Cape to Rio race strategy call – trading off extra distance against the risk of the South Atlantic high – is being played out in real time by two of the Start 1 fleet. Mojie and JM Busha 54, within a pebbles-throw of each other two days ago after both following the conventional northerly route out of Cape Town, parted company as Mojie edged to the west with the body of the fleet, and JM Busha 54 determinedly pushed to the north, even putting in a substantial leg well to the east of north.


    TRACKER

    Highly risky, some said, but for those of us who know the Robinson family and their refreshing readiness to do things their own way, otherwise known as The Carltonville Way, this boldness came as no surprise. It’s too early to be sure, but with reports from JM Busha 54 of average speeds of 11kts and spells of surfing at 17kts, boldness might well turn out to be their friend. For more about the goings-on way up to the north of the fleet, Ryan Robinson’s report “Day 4 – The Plague” on jmbusha54sailing.com is a great read.

    In the meanwhile, much further south, the high has changed from egg-shaped to sausage shaped in the past 40 hours, which might tempt some to think of trying to break through to the south. Watch that space.

    Turning to Start 2, early predictions are for conditions very similar to those for Start 1 last week – a very light south westerly in the morning, swinging south and freshening to 12 to 15 knots just in time for the 1400 start. After that, it looks as though the second fleet will be favoured for a while, by more solid south easterlies than the first fleet had to deal with.

    This evening, Royal Cape Yacht Club will wish the Start Two fleet well at the “Commodore’s Salute”, starting at 1800.

    by Dave Hudson

    https://cape2rio2020.com/cape2rio2020-day-4-report/?
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    Projection Towards Rio Looking Good



    TRACKER



    Ocean racing is one of those difficult sports as one has to have a well planned strategy before the start and stick to as changing strategy is slow, especially if you want to be somewhere quite distant on the course. It’s not as if a position change will happen quickly, and could take many hours or even a day or two.

    Which is why I am impressed with the manner the ‘JM Busha 54′ team have stuck to their guns from the start, and now appear to be in a really good position, while climbing the leader board too. They are the most Northerly boat in the fleet, with their current position and course showing them to now be making some ‘westing’. My guess is that during today they may well consolidate their position further and move to the top of the leader board. They are currently fastest on the water in terms of boat speed (as of the latest satellite ‘ping’ which is at a point in time), going in a good direction, and looking to have found some good wind which will be with them for a few days yet. Plus, they have the highest run in the fleet of 62nm, 10 miles more that San Salvador and substantially more than their other rivals.

    ‘San Salvador’ has been ploughing along on a westerly course for a few days, and while they wear the leaders crown in terms of both line and handicap honours amongst the monohulls, it looks as if they will be staying in an area of lighter winds for most of today.

    The true race is now developing and unfolding, with compulsory 4-hourly viewing of the YB Tracker.
    Being the navigator and weather strategist on this race is not for the feint-hearted, and judging from the latest YB Tracking data – the ‘JM Busha 54′ team have been the bravest and most consistent.

    Roll on the next update as this is becoming exciting!

    by Richard Crockett



    09|01|2020
    Today's leaderboard and report- back from the fleet:





    𝗔𝗱𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻𝗮:
    Starting to blow

    𝗔𝗿𝗴𝗼𝗻𝗮𝘂𝘁:
    Fixing bug kite and just had beautifully cooked sirloin. On the braai of course.

    𝗖𝗶𝗮𝗼 𝗕𝗲𝗹𝗹𝗮 – 𝗝𝗠 𝗕𝗨𝗦𝗛𝗔 𝟱𝟰 𝗦𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗧𝗲𝗮𝗺:
    The wind is finally back and the team could not be happier! Full send from now to Rio

    𝗠𝘆𝗿𝘁𝗹𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗕𝗼𝗻𝗻𝗶𝗲𝘃𝗮𝗹𝗲:
    We are sailing under spinnaker in 12 knots of wind up the Namibian coast. A sunny beautiful day.

    We are 6 crew on board and has divided the day into 8 shifts of 3 hours each. We are 2 crew on shift at a time, 3 hours on shift and 6 hours off. Pierre and Sonja is on one shift, PK and Lize on the next shift and then Pietman and Inge. Being off shift does not mean now you sleep or read a book. (I have never read one page in a book on 7 previous Atlantic crossings.)

    When off shift you attend to other stuff, like fixing broken things, adjusting some equipment, cooking, washing, etc, then maybe if there is time, sleep a few hours.

    This morning all were on deck working together very hard to take PK up the mast to remove the self furling genoa from its aluminium bolt rope track, which has separated at a join. It took us 2 hours and the sail is now neatly folded and tied up on the foredeck. In 30 minutes we are going to take PK up the mast again to fix the separating aluminium foil with epoxy glue and new grub screws. We hope that will allow us to use the genoa again. At the moment we only use the main sail and spinnaker.

    Everybody is happy, we think we will cross to do the Atlantic crossing closer to Walvisbaai.

    Regards and Hi to everyone from all on board Myrtle.

    Pierre Albertyn

    𝗥𝗼𝗻𝗶𝗻:
    I never thought it possible but I think I am getting fat on this boat. Curry chicken with basmati rice to dinner. Then sundowner and a Cohiba cigar. Hoping the wind will pick up

    𝗨𝗺𝗼𝘆𝗮:
    we discovered today our alternator hasn’t been working and had critically low power on our aux battery. luckily with 2 Germans onboard we managed to strip it and rebuild it. luckily all is well again. we can play tunes and make water again: )
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    Cape2Rio Jan 10th Update


    TRACKER


    The Cape2Rio2020 Race intrigue continues, as the boats do their utmost to balance the options. On one hand, capitalizing on their most careful interpretation of the best macro-weather information available to them, while on the other hand making the most of the wind strength and direction in their particular part of the ocean.

    In these desperately light conditions, with deep-ocean swimming looking more attractive than trying to keep the boat moving, concentration is all-important. It’s fairly easy to keep a boat close to her VMG targets in moderate conditions, but it’s in the very strong and very light winds that the more skilled crews really make their gains. The lighter it gets, and the longer the light weather lasts, the more discipline it takes to keep coaxing a boat up to her marks. And the greater the relief when the wind eventually fills in. This was well expressed in JM Busha 54’s latest message “The wind is finally back and the team could not be happier.”

    Sulanga, after being the western-most boat for much of the first few days of the race, seem to have made a big call early on Tuesday morning, heading determinedly north for the next couple of days before turning back to the west again yesterday afternoon. Could this have been a response to the evident success at that time of JM Busha 54’s big northerly punt?

    In the meantime, the fascinating tussle between Mojie and JM Busha 54 continues. This has all the signs of being a duel to the line.

    San Salvador, having sailed one of the most westerly courses in the Start 1 fleet, is still backing the more direct route to Rio. She will be watched with interest.




    10|01|2020
    Today's leaderboard and report- back from the fleet - They're a bit quieter today so must be getting some wind:

    𝗠𝘆𝗿𝘁𝗹𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗕𝗼𝗻𝗻𝗶𝗲𝘃𝗮𝗹𝗲:

    We had 20 knots of wind from South the whole of yesterday and made good miles under main sail and spinnaker. Today is sunny with 14 knots of wind from the South and we are moving satisfactory.

    We have not had much luck with fishing, but this morning Lize found a small ink fish (Chokka-type) who jumped on deck last night. Too small to eat. Lize and PK presented Pilatus classes on the foredeck. We saw TamTam crossing our stern last night. Skipper of TamTam is Jasper van der Westhuizen who only has one arm – inspiring and amazing.

    Love to all.

    Pierre

    𝗥𝗼𝗻𝗶𝗻:
    Finally feels like we going to Rio and not Angola. Weather now perfect and moving fast. Just baked bread rolls and made boeri rolls for lunch.

    https://cape2rio2020.com/cape2rio2020-day-6-report/
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    Maserati Multi 70 In The Gates In Capetown



    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi 70’s Team are ready for the Cape2Rio 2020
    The challenge with the 80-feet LoveWater starts tomorrow at 14.30 local time
    A Southerly wind of 15-20 knots is expected for the first 36 hours of the race


    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi 70’s Team are ready for a new big challenge, the Cape2Rio 2020, 3.600 miles from Cape Town to Rio de Janeiro. The start is a little more than 24 hours away: tomorrow January 11th at 14.30 local time (12.30 UTC, 13.30 Italian time) Maserati Multi 70 and their competitor, the 80’ LoveWater, will cross the starting line in Table Bay, before Cape Town, and will head North West towards the Island of Trindade, before setting course to the finish line in Rio de Janeiro.
    There are three different starts for the 25 boats entering the race: thirteen smaller boats started on January 4th, the bigger monohulls will start tomorrow at 14.00 local time and the two faster multihulls at 14.30 local time.




    The weather models show conditions that are typical of this region, with a high pressure zone in the middle of the Atlantic ocean: for the start is expected a Southerly wind between 15 and 20 knots, that will then get lighter and turn more South-Easterly first, and more Easterly later. Giovanni Soldini comments: "The weather we’re expecting for the first half of the race seems ideal. We will have to find the right balance to sail around the high pressure without extending our course too much".


    Aboard Maserati Multi 70 skipper Giovanni Soldini will sail with an international crew: the Italians Guido Broggi (mainsail trimmer), John Elkann (helmsman and trimmer), Nico Malingri and Matteo Soldini (both grinders and trimmers), the Spanish Carlos Hernandez Robayna (trimmer) and Oliver Herrera Perez (bowman) and the French Pierre-Laurent Boullais.

    Maserati Multi 70’s direct competitor, LoveWater, is a 80-feet French-owned trimaran of the ULTIM class, the giants of the sea: it is 10 feet longer than the Italian trimaran, so it is potentially faster.

    Aboard LoveWater, alongside skipper Craig Sutherland, there is a skilled crew, including Brian Thompson, expert of ocean multihulls. Among his significant results, worthy of note are the victories in the 2006 Volvo Ocean Race aboard Mike Sanderson’s ABN AMRO ONE and in the 2012 Jules Verne Trophy aboard Loick Peyron’s Banque Populaire V. Thompson is also former skipper of MOD70 Phaedo3 and crewman of the trimaran Argo, both of which have been challenged many times by Maserati Multi 70.


    The only other Italian entrant of this edition is Federico Borromeo’s Southern Wind 102 Almagores II, skippered by Andrea Henriquet.

    Born in 1971, organized by the Royal Cape Yacht Club and held every two or three years, the Cape2Rio is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest intercontinental yacht race and has always been a legendary event for every experienced sailor. The race historically attracted many Italian participants: the only other Italian winners besides Maserati are Giorgio Falck’s Guia III and Carlo di Mottola Balestra’s Chica Tica, respectively winners of handicap honours and handicap Trophy in the 1976 edition. The same year also the great sailor Ida Castiglioni participated aboard Kiaola II with an all-female crew.


    The original course starts in Cape Town and arrives in Rio de Janeiro, but for some editions the finish line has been moved to other destinations: in the years of the anti-Apartheid protests the race finished in Punta del Este, Uruguay, and, in 2006 and 2009, in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil.


    The current record belongs to Soldini himself: in 2014, aboard the monohull VOR70 Maserati, he won the race with an elapsed time of 10 days, 11 hours, 29 minutes and 57 seconds.
    The challenge is supported by Maserati, Main and Title Sponsor and Aon as co-sponsor, along with the official supplier for the clothing, Ermenegildo Zegna.
    A special thanks also to Boero Bartolomeo S.p.A., Garmin Marine and TarrosTarros..
    For news and updates follow:
    www.maserati.soldini.it.com
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    Love Water & Maserati Depart Cape Town



    Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi 70 set sail for the 16th edition of the Cape2Rio
    Soldini: "The boat is ready and the crew is super experienced, we will give it our best!"


    They’re off! At 14.30 local time (12.30 UTC, 13.30 Italian time) Giovanni Soldini and Maserati Multi 70’s Team crossed the starting line of the 16th edition of the Cape2Rio, the 3.600-mile-long historical transoceanic race from Cape Town to Rio de Janeiro.





    In Table Bay’s waters, before the South African city, Maserati Multi 70 and the competitor LoveWater set sail with 10/12 knots of Westerly wind. After a few minutes Maserati Multi 70’s Team, on the wake of their competitor, reached the second turning mark, to the North, where the wind dropped abruptly to 3 knots, making the manoeuvres very slow and difficult. Having cleared the obstacle, the Italian trimaran was forced to sail with just the main sail to solve a technical problem: after twenty minutes Soldini’s Team was able to unfurl the headsail and started chasing their competitor, a few miles ahead, at top speed.


    The weather conditions expected are typical of this region, with a high pressure zone situated in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean: for the first 36 hours there will be a Southerly wind, that will then get lighter and turn more South-Easterly first, and more Easterly later. The Italian Team will have to find the ideal route to pass the high pressure without sailing in the middle of it and without extending the course too much.







    Aboard Maserati Multi 70 the skipper Giovanni Soldini is sailing with a 7-man crew: the Italians Guido Broggi (mainsail trimmer), John Elkann (helmsman and trimmer), Nico Malingri and Matteo Soldini (both grinders and trimmers), the Spanish Carlos Hernandez Robayna (trimmer) and Oliver Herrera Perez (bowman) and the French Pierre-Laurent Boullais.

    A few moments before setting sail, Giovanni Soldini commented: "I’m very happy about the great job we did in the last month and a half in the boatyard in Cape Town, the boat is ready and the crew is super experienced. We are quite confident that we will be able to sail a good race, it will be a great challenge to hold our own against a big boat such as LoveWater, but we’ll give it our best!"

    LoveWater, direct competitor of Maserati Multi 70, is a 80-foot-long ULTIM trimaran, with a very skilled crew, including the skipper Craig Sutherland and the English Brian Thompson. The trimarans’ start was the last one of the race: thirteen smaller boats set sail on January 4th and the big monohulls started today at 14.00 local time.
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    TRACKER


    11|01|2020
    Today's leaderboard and report- back from the fleet:
    We can report that we've have the best example of German efficiency to date... Haspa Hamburg sent in their 1st position report immediately after the start.

    Haspa Hamburg:
    It’s all fine on Board, we had a great start.

    Adriana:
    Today’s menu was chicken hot curry and beer
    Best regards

    Mojie 1:
    All is well. We’re headed West, finally! However, this point of sail makes life on board more. Hall gong due to heeling!

    Myrtle of Bonnievale:
    Sunny skies and crew in good mood. Yesterday Lize baked us a very delicious bread. Today it is Inge’s turn to bake a bread. PK and Pietman pushed Myrtle very hard the past 2 days. We had good wind (20 knots) for the spinnaker – too much sail up according to my liking. When the boat has too much sail up, she is over pressed and everything is under a lot of strain. Sonja is working very hard at everything – from cooking, organising the housekeeping, cleaning, being the medical officer, etc.

    Two nights ago PK and Pietman was pushing the limits and I said we should consider reducing sail. They felt we were fine but I thought less sail will be better. I went down below for some sleep, but the sound was overwhelming – it sounded like two steam trains constantly running past me on both sides. I could not close an eye and sat in the saloon watching them right through the night – I did not sleep 1 minute that night and thought I will have a chat to them in the morning. I watched them driving Myrtle right through the night. The next morning, before I could speak to them, an e mail came in from expert yachtsman, Bernard Farmer. Bernard will be the delivery skipper of Myrtle sailing her back to Cape Town from Brazil. I copy Bernard’s one liner e mail: “You guys are cooking!! Remember that ocean races are won at night!”

    Case closed.

    Well, we did wonderful miles in the right direction and we moved into first position on handicap. The race is now one week old and lots can happen in the next two to three weeks.

    Today at 14:00 is also the start of the second group of yachts in Cape Town. They are the super yachts, the big fast yachts – like Maserati. They are around 10 yachts on the start line and two of them are in our class – Multihulls: Maserati and Love Water. They are super fast and super expensive yachts. Their results will be added to the list daily from tomorrow. We all have a different handicap rating to make it possible that Myrtle, the smallest Multihull in the race, can compete with Maserati. If it takes Maserati 9 days to Brazil (and break the record for the crossing – which is why they are here), and if Myrtle takes 23 days to Brazil, Myrtle still wins Maserati – something like that.

    Love to all.

    Pierre Albertyn

    Ronin:
    Great run last night. 200 nm. All good here.

    Leaderboard: https://cape2rio2020.com/leaderboard-11012020/

    #cape2rio2020 #adventureofalifetime
    City of Cape Town Discoverctwc TAAG Angola Airlines FlySAA
    Argonaut JM Busha 54 Peace Sailing Team - Cape2Rio 2020 Indulgence Cape2Rio SV Northern Light JML Rotary Scout LoveWater Sailing Team Zulu Girl Racing Giovanni Soldini Pagina Ufficiale #angolacables
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    Cape2Rio Update: The Big Tri's Catch The Leaders

    12|01|2020



    Today's leaderboard and report- back from the fleet:
    𝘱𝘩𝘰𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘥𝘪𝘵: 𝘡𝘜𝘓𝘜 𝘎𝘐𝘙𝘓 𝘱𝘰𝘸𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘣𝘺 𝘔𝘈𝘡𝘐

    𝗔𝗱𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻𝗮:
    Our spinnaker blew, under repair now
    Best regards

    𝗖𝗶𝗮𝗼 𝗕𝗲𝗹𝗹𝗮 - 𝗝𝗠 𝗕𝗨𝗦𝗛𝗔 𝟱𝟰 𝗦𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴:
    WE HAVE JUST CROSSED THE MERIDIAN! We celebrated with some good old top deck chocolate. But we have better news, our desalinator is up and running and making water as well as usual. Please send our thanks to Ronin for the offer of water! But we are going to have to decline now that we have a desalinator desalinating. Please also let them know that we will sort them out with a beer when we arrive in Rio as a thank you gesture!

    𝗟𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝗪𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗿:
    All good onboard. going fast… (received by sms).
    Day 2 report (as submitted by email – shows just how difficult it is to type when sailing at these speeds!):
    Lovewater has had two geeat days runs with a 24hr run of 597nm to 5pm sunday afternoon.
    That is over 1000km in 24 hrs.
    At the moment we are engaged in a tactical duel with Mas and at the same time balancing that with the vagaries of the wind and weather systems around the South Atlantic High. So far we have seen that we have the ability to match MAS in certain conditions and that with some smart routing and positioning we are competitive in this ocean scale match race.we entered the tropics in the early hours of this morning and the sea has adopted the azure blue of the deep ocean with lots of flying fish about. the sa temperature is now up to 27 deg and conditions onboard are very pleasant – if you can call driving a roller coaster through a constant car wash pleasant. Everyone is good onboard. We have seen many ships and also this morning a school of dolphins showed up. Onward to rio at pace…..


    TRACKER



    𝗠𝗼𝗷𝗶𝗲:
    All is well. More of the same in the trade wind downhill sailing. Great joy for the newbies at crossing the meridian this morning.

    𝗠𝘆𝗿𝘁𝗹𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗕𝗼𝗻𝗻𝗶𝗲𝘃𝗮𝗹𝗲:
    Last night was not a good night. All my fault. The wind was strong and I heard the two steam trains below again. I sat in the saloon to get away from the noise. My nerves as tight as a high pitched guitar string. At the end of Pietman’s shift, Myrtle threw her bum sideways again. We decided to lower the bigger spinnaker and hoist the smaller one. When all of that was done after half an hour’s hard foredeck work, the wind shifted and we had to do most of the work again to change tack. After that was done, the wind dropped to very low knots. Then the wind shifted again and we changed the sail again. Then the wind dropped completely and we lowered the smaller spinnaker and hoisted the bigger one again, only to see that it has a tear in the higher part of the sail. So the sail came down again to be patched and taped up later today. That was the story of the whole of last night with little miles gained to show for all our effort. We have 8 knots of wind at the moment with 4 knots boat speed.

    Everyone is happy. Inge and Lize did some fancy exercises in the cockpit this morning.

    Love to all.

    Pierre Albertyn

    𝗥𝗼𝗻𝗶𝗻:
    I was busy with watermaker again. We have run into a hole unfortunately and lost speed. Watermaker popped again but managed to repair again. Hope it lasts. Otherwise all good here.

    𝗦𝗮𝗿𝗮𝘃𝗮𝗵:
    Yesterday Haspa Hamburg appeared on the horizon, and during the last 24 hs we have been playing match racing with each other and having lots of fun. Winds on a beam reach at a nice strength provided amazing sailing conditions, and we have been switching spinnakers at least twice per day.

    The night brought challenging conditions but the crew kept the pedal to the metal and we screamed through the dark, reaching speeds higher than 16 knots!

    The first reported positions showed Saravah to be the most westerly boat. That puts us well behind the leaderboard, but we are sure our strategy will pay in the medium to long term. Time will tell.

    No breakages, but the crew have been busy using tools in order to improve our sleeping quarters. We are trying to fit 9 people into 3 bunks. So far so good, as no one had to sleep together.

    Right now, 100% blue skies!

    Saravah!













    Like greyhounds, the moment they were set free they were off at breakneck speeds for Rio, with the record books looking like they might well be re-written. Almost shadowing each other up the West Coast in the early stages, this looked like a match race made in heaven, but during the night they have shown they have different strategies as their paths have crossed – twice now.

    ‘Maserati’ is heading northwards, with ‘Love Water’ taking a more westerly course, and both doing over 20 knots of boat speed. This move is interesting as it looks as if ‘Love Water’ is sailing towards lighter wind pressure, and ‘Maserati’ into stronger pressure – but that was all in the 06h00 tracker info this morning. The 10h00 tracker detail shows that they are now back sailing parallel courses and closing Luderitz at 25-plus knots. ‘Maserati’ has covered 198nm in less than 20 hours since the start, and ‘Love Water’ 229nm. As always it’s a waiting game – and an intriguing one too.

    For the monohulls that started yesterday in the second start, they have had good winds and are making good progress, unlike their counterparts who started a week earlier and were plagued with light winds for several days.

    However it’s all a bit incongruous right now as the tracker shows ‘Zulu Girl’ leading the fleet overall on handicap – and she has not even been racing for 24 hours and has only covered 147nm!

    So for convenience sake and clarity, I will cover the two ‘starts’ separately for the next few days until, things settle down. But don’t get me wrong here, the fleet that started yesterday is hot, and all have the will and determination to win the coveted South Atlantic Trophy.

    The second-starters are all sailing a similar course and making a good amount of westing right now and should all start picking up stronger winds later today, so some impressive 24-hour runs could be on the cards.

    At the head of the fleet for now in terms of the first-starters, ‘Umoya’ continues to impress despite her now ducking down and sailing a good 60 degrees lower than her rivals. Has she seen something no-one else has, or does she have an issue on board that has forced this move? ‘JM Busha 54′ is still the most northerly boat by quite some distance, and is closing in on the 20degree south latitude quite rapidly. Now in the old South Atlantic Races (Rio & Uruguay) when Ilha da Trindade was a mark of the course, there was an unwritten rule that one had to get to 20degrees south and follow that parallel to the island before heading to the finish. Maybe this is their strategy?

    ‘Mojie 1′ is also looking good and sailing fast, with both her and ‘Umoya’ having clocked up over 170nm in the last 24 hours. Doesn’t this pale into insignificance when compared to the distance covered by the two big dogs!

    So to wrap what has been a disjointed report, the Line Honours leader is still ‘Sulanga’ (48′ catamaran – first start) followed by ‘Umoya’ and ‘Mojie 1′.

    The monohull handicap honours are with ‘Zulu Girl’ followed by ‘Mussulo 40′ and ‘Umoya’.

    ‘Myrtle of Bonnievale’ retains the multihull handicap honours with ‘Mussolo 40′ leading from ‘Ballyhoo Too’ in the double-handed division.

    There’s lots happening out there, so don’t stray or go away – as the YB Tracker will bring it all to you in the comfort of your home, office or wherever you are.

    Richard Crockett

    https://cape2rio2020.com/cape2rio2020-day-8-report/
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  9. #9
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Maserati & Love Water Reeling In The Miles


    TRACKER


    Where to start today? With two distinct groups on the water it’s difficult to give a single overview, so once again I will cover the two groups separately.

    But before that one just has to stand back in awe at the sheer speed and distance covered by the two big dogs, ‘Maserati’ and ‘Love Water’ as they are stripping miles off the chart quicker than a marauding gamefish strips line off a reel!

    ‘Love Water’ has covered 1110nm since the start and ‘Maserati’ 1072nm – all this in less than 48 hours at sea. That’s shunting as the last tracker ‘ping’ showed them doing 19.7 knots and 20.5 knots respectively and still heading towards the 20S line of latitude. To really put this in perspective the YB Tracker also shows them just astern of the fleet which started 9 days ago now – and who by nightfall will be a memory to these two big dogs.



    Guido Broggi, boat captain of Maserati Multi 70, explains the damage suffered to the piston of the foil at the start of the Cape2Rio 2020 and the solution found by the Italian Team.
    At 12 UTC Maserati Multi 70 sails 37 miles ahead of its competitor LoveWater. The wind is falling, except for a few lumps, and the Italian trimaran sails between 20 and 30 knots of speed.


    So in amongst the ‘northern fleet’ we are now, and how demoralising it must be to hear, or even see, a massive trimaran blast through as if you are standing still. Life is about choices – some take it at breakneck speeds while others at a more leisurely pace! I know which I would rather be on right now!

    Of the three boats we have spoken about most in this ‘northern fleet’, and especially the monohulls, ‘JM Busha 54′, ‘Mojie 1′ and ‘Umoya’ are still out front in this fleet, but now suffering overall on handicap when one considers the newcomers to the fray in the ‘southern fleet’. But what stands out for me is how badly off the pace ‘Umoya’ has been for the past 36 hours, and how ‘JM Busha 54′ is making a comeback, still as the most northerly boat, and also the boat with the biggest distance covered in the last 24 hours of 195nm. That’s good going for a small boat, with this resurgence catapulting them up the leader board and being ahead of their rivals for the first time in some days.
    First across the Meridian and into the west was ‘Sulanga’ and then ‘Mojie 1′, with several boats closing that imaginary line down fast and crossing it during the day.

    So further south, and soon to put their first 48 hours at sea behind them is the ‘southern fleet’ being led by the two-handed crew of ‘Mussulo 40′ which also wears the leaders crown in the two-handed fleet.

    Wearing the leaders crown in the monohull division is still ‘Zulu Girl’ with an impressive 205nm under her keel in the past 24 hours. Judging by the reports and pics coming off this boat, her crew are having the adventure of a lifetime – and loads of fun too.

    A little snippet I noticed from the tracker when drilling down is that it shows ‘Love Water’ with an estimated finish date of 21 January – and immediately below that ‘Rotary Scout’ with an estimated finish date of 21 February – a full month later. It’s a slow passage for the Scouts I am afraid.

    The race is unravelling fast with the strategies of the various boats only likely to be revealed by the end of the week. There is everything to play for and no time to slack off.

    Richard Crockett

    https://cape2rio2020.com/cape2rio2020-day-9-report/





    12|01|2020
    Today's leaderboard and report- back from the fleet:


    ADRIANA:
    Spinaker ready now
    Best regards

    Alamgores II:
    Amazing sailing conditions yesterday but now temperature is going up and wind is going down. Today we already tried 4 different spinnakers and damaged 2, one of them beyond repair. The next 3 days will be critical for the result of the race. Morale is very high onboard. Starry nights and blue skies during the day.

    Anjo:
    some racing sails issues but we soldier on to 23S@

    Ballyhoo Too:
    Hello All
    All is well on Ballyhoo, currently flying along with our small symmetrical spinnaker and reefed main. We made around 190NM the first and second day, and will probably make around 200NM today, so we are happy with our progress so far.

    We had a few set backs on the way, on the second night we got caught with a big spinnaker up with 27knts of wind. We ran with it for while, surfing at up to 16knts, waiting for a lull in the wind to take it down. The lull never came and the result was a spectacular broach and a spinnaker that needs to be repaired by our friends at North Sails.

    Yesterday evening our autopilot tiller mount broke, which also resulted in a mighty broach and us having to hand steer since then. This was also a bit of a challenge as last night the wind came up to 25-30knts and we had to reef and change headsails with one person on the helm the whole time. Stoff has repaired the mounting, but we will only be able to use it in gentle conditions or for short period of time when we need two sets of hands.

    It feels like we are getting into the trades now, and the conditions are beautiful and we are catching up on sleep and in good spirts.

    Indulgence:
    Good day, All well on Indulgence,

    Love Water:
    ALL GOOD ONBOARD

    Moji:
    It has been raining this morning and there was a rainbow with our sunrise, with the extremely rare highlight of the day thus far was watching the sails of Maserati cross the horizon about 1.5 miles to our south. Wow. Sheer raw pace.

    Mussulo 40:
    Everything Ok!
    regards
    Jose

    Myrtle of Bonnievale:
    Yesterday afternoon PK went up the mast again to epoxy the separating foil sleeve of the jib. Last night at 02:00 UTC we crossed the zero degree line of longitude, the Greenwich meridian. Only Pietman and Inge were awake and we will celebrate the occasion later today with our own in-house ritual.

    Early this morning a flying fish landed at my feet while I was at the helm. This little fish is now hanging out to dry as a ‘bokkom’ (Local South African delicacy) after being salted.

    We’ve done some good mileage over the last 18 hours. Every going well. Pietman is practicing complicated knots with Inge for her qualification for which she earns a chocolate if correct. A bit nasty.


    Pierre Albertyn

    Ronin:
    At last we are in the West. Watermaker behaving and all well here's. Just waiting for the wind to pick up tomorrow. Been teaching my bread making skills to young Kevan here so I don't have to do all the baking. Made his first loaf this morning and was great. Lots of sleeping and eating going on here. Normal day��

    Umoya:
    trades finally settling so starting to make some progress West!

    See the full leaderboard here: https://cape2rio2020.com/leaderboard-14012020/








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  10. #10
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
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    Cape 2 Rio, Jan 15th : Leaders Pass St Helena


    TRACKER


    With the front-runners now passing due south of St Helena Island in good breeze, it’s been a spectacular first half for these boats, who are now starting the slow turn down around the south Atlantic high and aiming at last for Rio.

    What an inspiration and thrill it must be for the young crews aboard yachts like JM Busha, Rotary Scout, Haspa Hamburg and Zulu Girl to see just how quickly the two big trimarans have covered the first half of the race course! Remember, both these trimaran teams have been sailing and racing in many different forms for decades and have multiple Cape to Rio races to their collective credit already – and they themselves are fulfilling their dreams. I have no doubt that the future success stories of the youngsters in this race will reference the influence that these star racing tris have had on them here…

    For the race, aren’t we lucky that these two tri’s are so closely matched for pace? The intrigue is all-absorbing, and the mind wanders rampantly with multiple options, lead swaps and scenarios, in between the four-hourly tracker updates, as to what the next moves and progress will be…

    And as the trimarans currently fly past the three Start One front-runners – Sulanga, Mojie and JM Busha – the next 24 hours holds the next big move in their race; and that is how to transition through or around the long sausage-shaped high pressure band that lies between the front of the fleet and the final 1000 mile run into Rio.

    Weather systems are dynamic, and unlocking this next challenge successfully is going to be a fascinating thing to watch, with possibly race-defining outcomes.

    Throughout the fleet, dreams are being realised and the race media channels are sharing as many of these stories as we can. They are varied, fantastic and awe-inspiring. The feel-good club based Corinthian aspect of this race must be carefully cherished and protected, as we grow the race into the future, while also attracting opportunities to bring future record-breakers and pro challengers to the race…

    By Luke Scott




    15|01|2020
    Today's leaderboard and report- back from the fleet:
    𝘱𝘩𝘰𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘥𝘪𝘵: 𝘑𝘔𝘓 𝘙𝘰𝘵𝘢𝘳𝘺 𝘚𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘵

    𝗔𝗱𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻𝗮:
    today we had lamb and champagne
    best regards

    𝗔𝗻𝗷𝗼:
    racing main put out to pasture cruising main up and running: Neptune told team Anjo to go west and they responded Ahrr

    𝗟𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝗪𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗿:
    ALL GOOD ONBOARD. HAMMER DOWN AT MOMENT

    𝗠𝗼𝗷𝗶𝗲:
    We have repaired our Big Bertha spinnaker – first the head and then four separate holes. We are enjoying the bigger swells with our smaller symmetrical spinnaker up, and Mojie’s Big Wave Surfing Crew are on standby to take on the Dungeons of the South Atlantic, if Neptune delivers on the forecast.

    𝗠𝘂𝘀𝘀𝘂𝗹𝗼 𝟰𝟬 – 𝗧𝗲𝗮𝗺 𝗔𝗻𝗴𝗼𝗹𝗮 𝗖𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲𝘀:
    Everything Ok!
    regards
    Jose

    𝗠𝘆𝗿𝘁𝗹𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗕𝗼𝗻𝗻𝗶𝗲𝘃𝗮𝗹𝗲:
    Now hear this, Now hear this: Stunning performance on SV Myrtle of Bonnievale in celebrating the Greenwich Meridian.

    Late yesterday afternoon, Lize Maartens and Inge Swart (the only 2 crew members who have not crossed the Greenwich Meridian before), gave an electrifying performance of dancing which had the crowd on their feet. Never before has “Echame La Culpa” by Luis Fonsi & Demi Lovato been performed on a dance floor at this level. The dance performed by them can be described as a cross between a “Boesmanland-Riel” and “The Floss”. In short we just call it the Myrtle-skoffel (𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘴𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯: 𝘔𝘺𝘳𝘵𝘭𝘦-𝘴𝘩𝘶𝘧𝘧𝘭&#120358. Afterwards a few members of the crowd were pulsed for their opinion. Pietman: “I did not know Inge can do that.” PK: “That is not the Lize I know”. Sonja: “Ja-Nee” (𝘺𝘦𝘴-𝘯&#120368. Skipper: “I tried to join them a few times, but could not keep up. Ek het mos n knieg. (𝘐 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘢 𝘬𝘯𝘦&#120358

    We are having 15 to 20 knots of wind, just enough to keep the spinnaker from not being overpowered. We move on in the right direction at between 7 and 9 knots, sometimes surfing at 11 to 12 knots.

    Swell height: 3,5 meter, Outside temperature: 26.3 deg C, Water temperature: 24,2 deg C.

    Crew is happy and fed.

    Love to all

    Pierre Albertyn

    𝗥𝗼𝗻𝗶𝗻:
    Having a hectic day. First we loose our second kite and then our main sheet shears off on the aft end of the boom. Drop all sail and repair. We doing pretty well now on wing and wing arrangement with full main and Genoa. Bonus that the wind has picked up. Ronin

    𝗦𝗮𝗿𝗮𝘃𝗮𝗵:
    Today we reached an expected area of lighter winds, but have been able to keep the boat moving, at the cost of constantly changing spinnakers. Some maintenance chores onboard also have kept the crew busy. Lots of expectation for what will happen in the next 24 hs…

    See today's leaderboard here: https://cape2rio2020.com/leaderboard-15012020/








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