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Thread: (Broken) Heart of Gold

  1. #11
    Group 3 Studmuffin Sanity Check's Avatar
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    I'd still credit the skipper and crew for sharing the live video and suspect that other generally well-sailed boats might appear to be less well-sailed when watched under the cold clear eye of unedited CCTV.

    Anyhow, not to diminish the comment above regarding corrosion, but it occurs to me to ask: is a vang of 16:1* excessive for such a boat? I see the value of enabling the smallest crew to put proper force on such a control even when they are reaching over their shoulder from the rail, etc., but has anyone devised a system for limiting the ultimate force from such tackle? Perhaps a heavy extension spring or some sort of slip clutch?

    It seems to me that if there is nearly a half-ton of pre-load on a vang and the boom crashes outward suddenly, even a new boom on a fast-moving boat is going to have trouble dealing with the upward bending stress as the main's leech snaps tight. Is that a valid thought?

    *might just be 12:1 but from another video of the boat it looks like four part tackle at the base of the mast.

  2. #12
    Sanity, agree with your point on everyone looks bad showing a video of that type of event. While I've never made a mistake, I have seen Rainer break 4 spinnaker poles trying to learn to sail a boat with more then just one sail.

    I think the focus on vang purchase is kind of missing the point. If you have a 1:1 vang and pull it on while going upwind with the mainsheet cranked you will break your boom if it's windy when you ease the main off to turn downwind. If you want to engineer protections into every system on the boat you will either have the worlds heaviest boat or one that can never be sailed to it's full potential. When someone is adjusting the vang they, or someone behind them, need to look at the sail and confirm it's trimmed properly. We used to write VOC (vang, outhaul, cunningham)- COV on the centerboards of the juniors to remind them (us) what to check prior to a mark rounding.

    When things break on proven designs 99% of the time it's operator error or poor maintenance. Don't mean to knock the owner/crew but the video either showed one or both of those things. The cool thing about sailing is everyone always has more they can learn and the video should be a great learning tool for the boat and the rest of us that watch it.


    Back to the real point, I find the one for the doctor one for the bath approach works best for bath salts. The trick is to have someone throw the radio in the bath when the white rabbit peaks.

  3. #13
    Glad nobody was hurt and hope Joan gets her back on the water soon... Heart of Gold is a well-sailed boat with a nice crew! Sometimes these crazy equipment failures just happen, and glad it wasn't more major and that it didn't fall on someone!

  4. #14
    Group 3 Studmuffin Sanity Check's Avatar
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    She got a loaner boom and scored a bullet in her last race if I'm not mistaken.

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