Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 51

Thread: Sodebo 2016-2017 Solo Round The World Record Attempt

  1. #21
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Coville Collides With Mammal



    Tracker

    Coville remains ahead of IDEC's 2007-2008 Reference by 383 nm


    AN INDIAN WITHOUT PLAY
    The tension was palpable this morning in the voice of the routers of Sodebo Ultim '.
    The crossing of the Indian appeared virile: it has been muscled for nearly 30 hours and it will be still all day. On board, everything is done to adapt speed and strategy to the conditions of wind and sea.


    RETURN ON THE LAST 24 HOURS ON SODEBO ULTIM '

    Stress and energy for Thomas Coville
    Yesterday around 4 pm, the shore-based routers received a message from Thomas warning them that he had clipped a marine mammal while sailing at 30 knots. He announces that he will slow down to assess the damage. At this pace, the shock was violent but fortunately without major consequences. Thomas was able to quickly reattach the starboard saffron linkage system that had been hit in the collision.

    In this weather context, this type of intervention is not insignificant. One must imagine him alone in the midst of the gales of winds, with his tools in his hand, sitting astride the back float swept by the waves! Minutes of craftsmanship during which the sailor draws from his reserves of energy and lucidity.




    The round back in the heart of Forties
    At the heart of Forantième, the skipper of the trimaran has no choice but to make the round back and adapt. In these extreme conditions, he moves on all fours on the boat. Tap on his keyboard to exchange with the cell routing becomes almost impossible.

    While it circles the very strong wind and sea core generated by the depression that passes in its south, the whole game consists in avoiding that the boat leaves in overspeed. Yesterday under J3 and 2 reefs in the mainsail, it was going down the ocean with points at 45 knots in hollows of 6 to 7 meters pushed by winds of 33 knots on average.
    For almost two hours, the skipper chose the voice of reason. He preferred to slow down his unrestrained race by slackening the sail before and keeping the minimum canvas in the mainsail.

    "We are not looking for high peak speeds but rather a good average very difficult to obtain in these conditions of sea and unstable wind" explained this morning Thierry Douillard one of the members of the routing cell set up by Jean-Luc Nélias To accompany the skipper of Sodebo Ultim 'in his attempt to record around the world.

    Tomorrow
    These challenging and challenging sailing conditions will accompany the boat at least until tonight. The skipper is expected to pass in the north of the Kerguelen Islands on Thursday, and then dive further south towards Cape Leeuwin, the second of the three major caps to be crossed in this sailing world tour.








    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  2. #22
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Colville Reflects




    AN INDIAN OCEAN TRUSTED TO ITS REPUTATION
    10000 miles traveled since his departure! Alone at sea for 17 days, Thomas Coville tells what it means to sail in the Indian Ocean on a boat the size of Sodebo Ultim '. As he goes north of the Kerguelen Islands, the skipper of Sodebo Ultim' recalls the last 48 hours which were very intense.

    Like many sailors, he dreaded the Indian Ocean even though he enjoyed "sailing surrounded by hundreds of birds including albatrosses, one of which came to land that night on the boat. "

    Of the boat, it says the greatest good although it confesses that "if it is an asset to have a wider boat to go faster, the management of its power is a permanent chessboard between the taking of risks and Your ability to react to all events. "

    Regarding maneuvers on board, he acknowledged that "for one man, it is always a titanic work and given the size of the sails, you have no interest in making a mistake in your choices"




    Tracker
    *

    THE LIFE IN SOLO IN THE INDIAN ON SODEBO ULTIM '

    "A tightrope walker in the middle of nothing"

    "Yesterday I had to repair the rudder transmission bar on the float following a brush with a whale. It tapped very hard and the rudder was detached from the float. I had to ride on the float. I was going to take a picture to send it to my technical team, when I felt my legs slip, the feeling I was going to go through. So I lost the camera. A lot of adrenaline!

    You're a tightrope walker in the middle of nothing. You know that if you can not repair the saffron, it's abandonment. But I immediately found the right solution to fix it. I went into the cockpit, the legs in cotton but with the feeling of a small victory.

    *
    The Indian Ocean

    "Here you are just tolerated. It's hostile. Yesterday there were really seacrest's and troughs advertised up to 10 meters. I did not see it but it was big.

    This morning before returning the 3rd reef, I had to go to the end of boom and I found myself in a stream of hailstones that accumulated in this great gutter. I was on all fours to move forward. It is getting very cold. It stung under the grain of hail!
    *

    Today it is fairly beautiful, more and more cold and the wind is still relatively steady - about 30 knots - but the sea is getting less and it changes your life.

    Here it is summer. It is 4 degrees and it is daylight for about 20 hours. There are only 4 hours during which you advance in the dark without moon and without seeing the gusts of wind and the size of the waves! "

    *
    Protect yourself from frost

    "I wear: a hood, an undercoat that serves as my first skin, a warm bodysuit, a pair of trousers and a waxen top and I alternate with two pairs of boots and socks to always be dry.
    To sleep, I remain dressed except the top of wax but I keep everything because one must be ready to intervene in the second. "

    Fast but not furious

    "You want to go faster, but it's not always prudent. When you try, you realize it's just anything. It was necessary to pass this nucleus of big waves of 8-9 meters, without breaking anything. I had the frustration of being below the routings and what was planned, which puts me under pressure.

    You have to be even more reactive than on my old boat. You do not have the right to the slightest mistake when you come down a wave at 40 knots, it's just colossal. You have to manage all the settings. The larger and wider the boat, the faster you reach high speeds and the lower the margin of error. "

    Food

    "Now I have two servings, two bags of freeze dried prepared with Sodebo. But sometimes the conditions are so violent that it is not easy to prepare to eat "
    *

    The abandonment of Vincent Riou, skipper of PRB, in the VENDÉE GLOBE

    "I heard the news yesterday when I learned of the abandonment of Vincent Riou. It affected me. It has the maturity of leaders and those who have already won the race. It puts so much energy into it. It is unfair. It destroys too many things. Vincent knows his boat so well that he could have exploited it completely in the south and show what he knows very well »
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  3. #23
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1


    Thomas Coville continues his march across the Indian Ocean, Currently 360 nm in advance of
    Francis Joyon's 2007-2008 record reference!













    Tracker


    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  4. #24
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Oz To The North, Coville Extends Lead



    Tracker

    Colville has begun re-extending his lead over IDEC's 2007-2008 reference, putting 66 more miles of distance
    to extend his lead to 446 NM!
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  5. #25
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Milestone For Coville



    Tracker

    Thomas Coville continues to extend his lead on IDEC's 2007-2008 Reference and has passed
    Cape Leeuwin in Western Australia in 21 Days, 3 Hours, 9 Minutes and 8 Seconds since departure from Quessant!
    1 day 12 Hours and 19 minutes ahead of time of Francis Joyon in 2007.

















    Last edited by Photoboy; 11-27-2016 at 11:09 AM.
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  6. #26
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Into The Pacific


    TRACKER

    Thomas Coville prepares to exit the Indian Ocean and enter the Pacific with a head of steam.
    Currently 1, 008 nm in advance of Francis Joyon's 2007-2008 singlehanded benchmark, Coville
    has also passed the 1/2 way mark, and now is just 12,044 nm from the finish in Ouessant.












    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  7. #27
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Nearly A Full Day Ahead



    "Thomas Coville entered in the Pacific Ocean this morning at 7 H51 Hour French, after crossing the Indian in 8 days 12 hours and 19 minutes... or 23 hours and 47 minutes Better than Francis Joyon in 2007. It's a new record for the skipper of sodebo ultim'! (awaiting approval wssrc)
    He is currently in advance of 2 DAYS 5 HOURS 4 minutes on the record!"




    TRACKER

    Sodebo Ultim now 1007 nm in advance of Francis Joyon's 2007-2008 Record



    Thomas speaks of the new record and consumes some green stuff... Check it out!
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  8. #28
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Coville's Joy Ride Continues!



    Thomas Coville continues to extend his lead over Francis Joyon's 2007-2008 reference,
    25 days in, Covill now finds himself 1,291 nm in advance.

    According to windytv.vom CLICKY Thomas may have some
    weak pressure gradients to work through during the next 4-5s before getting another strong push before exiting the Pacific
    and re-entering the Atlantic.











    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  9. #29
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    1,359 nm In Advance: Colville's Road To Cape Horn Goes Deep



    THE PACIFIC: A GREAT DESCENT IN SKI UNTIL THE HORN
    With a good half of the Pacific Ocean behind him, Thomas Coville now travels at a very high speed towards Cape Horn, which he should cross in the middle of the week - that is to say on Wednesday night - 'About two days on the record time.

    Constrained to descend below the latitude of Cape Horn, the skipper of Sodebo Ultim 'will regain the icy cold coming straight from the Antarctic ice pack.



    TRACKER




    The averages recorded are impressive, practically always more than 600 miles per day and an average of 27 knots per 24 hours. Some time ago, these distances were 24-hour records ....

    In 28 days, Thomas Coville traveled two-thirds of the route of this solo round-the-world tour between Ouessant and Ouessant. The speeds are so stressful that sleeping on board is a feat, there is no moment of respite. The lone skipper manages to obtain a few rare and short slices of sleep per 24 hours. Never more than two hours in a row.



    While sailing in the fifties in the direction of the famous Cape Horn which it should reach in about three days, the depressions which sweep the South Pacific control and influence the road of Thomas Coville. The skipper will descend very south almost to the sixties south that one of the pioneers of the first Vendée Globe had nicknamed the silent sixties.



    Thomas's last words in the session:

    "There is a depression that has developed in Fiji and I do not want to get caught up. She must not be passed over.

    I like to compare this situation to what is going on in mountaineering, New Zealand is the mountain. [...] It is a bit like having climbed crampons-piolet to the level of New Zealand , And then whououuu, it's gone for a great descent thoroughly in the powder to Cape Horn.

    For 27 days I have this pressure of these speeds and this infernal noise. I feel like being on the edge of a razor, the principle of the multihull is that you are between water and air and you evolve like a tightrope walker.

    I look forward to the Horn with the hope that I can relax a bit as I get tired. "

    *

    A few reminders of figures:

    Departure on November 6 at 14 hours 49 minutes and 52 seconds

    Passage of the Ecuador: the 12 of November at 8h 04min 54s

    Weather Ouessant / Ecuador *: 5d 17h 15m 2s

    Passage of the Cape of Good Hope: the 20 of November at 19h 33min 40s

    Ushant / Good Hope Time *: 14 days 4 hours 43 minutes and 48 seconds

    Passage of Cape Leeuwin: the 27 of November at 17:59

    Weather Ouessant / Cap Leeuwin: 21 days 3 hours 9 min and 8s

    Record of the Indian Ocean * (Cap des Aiguilles / Tasmania): 8d 12h 19m on November 29th at 7h51

    That is 23h 47min better than the previous record of Francis Joyon in 2007 (9j 12h6min)

    Average speed: 25.16 knots for 5325 miles

    Time Ouessant / Tasmania: 22d 17h 1m 23s - Either a lead of 2 days 5 hours 4 min on the record of Francis Joyon

    Time to beat: 57 days 13 hours and 34 minutes,

    Or an arrival before 3 January 2017 at 04 hours 22 minutes and 57 seconds.

    * Pending confirmation from WSSRC





    https://www.sodebo.com/fr/voile/actu...nte-jusqu-horn
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

  10. #30
    despondent correspondent Photoboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    11,604
    Blog Entries
    1

    3 Days Ahead



    This afternoon at 14 H 49 min and 52 seconds, it's been exactly a month that Thomas Coville crossed the starting line of his attempt to record of the tour of the world to ushant.
    Tomorrow already, Cape Horn, with nearly 3 days ahead of the current holder, Francis Joyon-Trimaran IDEC

    A MONTH OF SEA AND TOMORROW CAP HORN!
    Thomas Coville left Brest exactly one month ago, it was November 6, 2016 at 14 hours 49 minutes and 52 seconds.
    Alone at sea for 30 days, it has descended at good speed the North and South Atlantic Ocean, it crossed the Indian Ocean like a rocket and there it is to 700 miles to finish with the demanding and tempestuous Pacific . Today, Thomas Coville has two thirds of the tour of the world behind him.

    It is now approaching Cape Horn, often called the Cape of Deliverance, which it should leave to port (on its left) Wednesday night at around 11pm (French time).
    Sodebo Ultim 'is expected to sign a new solo Pacific record (10d 14h 26min owned by Idec) and put the flashing light on Ouessant with more than 3 days ahead of Francis Joyon's record. It will then be the long and often tedious ascent of the Atlantic towards its starting point.

    Tomorrow evening, Thomas Coville will leave the great hostile and desert expanses. He will find a semblance of civilization to set the course on Ouessant which he must reach before the 3 January at 04 hours 22 min to realize this dream that has pursued him for more than ten years: to become the fastest single-handed man Sailing around the world. For the past month, Thomas Coville has been piloting his Sodebo Ultim 'as if he were sailing with a crew of ten on board.




    TRACKER


    TIGHT TIMING

    The timing is tight for Thomas: if he manages to keep pace, he can catch a favorable stream of southwesterly wind that will carry him far enough after Cape Horn. No time to lose to enjoy this depression.

    Behind this train, there is another system with what is called a depressed pass between the two. A hardly predictable area with lower winds. The weather situation is changing very fast. The routing gives an ETA Wednesday evening around 8 pm local midnight French time.

    1700 MILES ADVANCE IS ABOUT THREE DAYS AND AIR WHICH PICKS

    It is very cold by 59 ° south. And the heating runs almost permanently on Sodebo Ultim '. Thomas descended very low up to 700 miles from the Antarctic coast. The nights are short, little real night, a darkness for a few hours and never more than two hours of sleep away
    " I just found out my nest egg has salmonella"



    h2oshots.com Photo Gallery

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •