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Thread: Sodebo Joins The Jules Verne Rush

  1. #11
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    886 Miles In 24 Hours



    TRACKER


    Sodebo Ultim 3, launched since Friday evening in a long sprint towards the Indian Ocean, comes out of a memorable Saturday day: Thomas Coville and his crew covered between Saturday and Sunday at midday 886 miles in 24 hours (1640km at 36.9 knots average), very close to the absolute 24 hour record (908.2 miles per Banque Populaire V in 2009). Their lead on the Idec Sport chart has increased further, by 651 miles this Sunday at 1 p.m.

    What a day ! Between Saturday and Sunday at midday, Sodebo Ultim 3 posted the third all-time performance over 24 hours, the trimaran having “swallowed” 885.7 miles, averaging 36.9 knots. In the history of the 24-hour record, only Banque Populaire V did better during its North Atlantic record in the summer of 2009, with 908.2 miles (37.84 knots), then Idec Sport on its Jules Verne victorious four years ago (894 miles). Suffice to say that if the "Sodeboys" continue at this rate, they could hang a first record on their hunting table.




    Who says average at 36 knots says peaks at more than 40, as Thomas Rouxel explained on Saturday evening, when Sodebo Ultim 3 had just passed under the island of Gough Island: “Since our last maneuver, we have not not been below 35 knots, we even made an hour above 40. I had never experienced this before, only these boats allow it, in particular conditions: there, we is at the front of a depression, which allows us to have strong wind and flat seas, it is quite exceptional. "







    Under these conditions, the autopilot is called upon: “At these speeds and when reaching, crosswind, the pilot steers better than the man; especially that at times, could not see 50 meters, continues the helmsman / adjuster of 38 years. We take care of the settings to get the most out of the boat's performance: we set ourselves an ideal heeling angle and we try to stick to it with the sheet and mainsail carriage settings. If the wind eases, we can also adjust the jib settings. "

    At these speeds, life on board is quite sporty: “It moves a lot, it makes a lot of noise, the movements of the boat are quite violent, it is complicated to move, you have to behave all the time. This afternoon, I prepared a small pasta dish for the community, it was a little adventure, I managed not to burn myself! "Despite this, the eight sailors manage to get to sleep:" As we are very tired, we manage to fall asleep and sleep properly, we have good mattresses and good sleeping bags, "confirms Thomas Rouxel.

    Who keeps some well-watered memories of the Great South: "The main ones are the big storms, like the one we had on the last edition of the Volvo Ocean Race on the Cape Horn stage (aboard Team Brunel) . We had 35 knots of average wind and a swell of 10 meters, that gave some impressive images, especially since on the Volvo 65s, you are all the time outside steering and adjusting, you are under the waves. »What is less the case on Sodebo Ultim 3:

    “We are looking for flat seas and winds of 20 knots; according to today's forecast, these are conditions that should be maintained almost as far as Cape Leeuwin. "

    And Thomas Rouxel concluded: “Going around the world on an Ultim trimaran is every sailor's dream; It's going relatively quickly, 40 days at sea, in a very good “comfort” all the same compared to a Volvo 65, where you are underwater all the time, or even an Imoca which is a very hard boat. It's the best, I'm happy to come back to these corners on Sodebo Ultim 3, even if it remains the South: we will be cold, we will be wet all the time because the humidity is 100%, there will constantly be condensation in the bins, it remains a relative comfort. "
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    One Cape Down: The Indian Ocean Beckons




    Storming the Jules Verne Trophy, Sodebo Ultim 3 crossed the Cape of Good Hope this Monday morning with a 17:35 lead over Idec Sport. The 8 crewmen of the giant trimaran got to grips with the subject of the Indian Ocean at 50 ° South. On the program: strong wind, sea, cold and high speed!

    After the beautiful glide of the weekend in the South Atlantic which allowed Sodebo Ultim 3 to run full ball towards the Cape of Good Hope, crossed Monday at 5 am, Thomas Coville and his seven teammates have changed the atmosphere at the same time. ocean time: "It's engaged, the sea is forming, the Indian Ocean is for me the most difficult", comments Thomas Coville in an impressive video sent by Martin Keruzoré, where we see the trimaran was going at full speed under a gray sky and on rough seas. “We changed the mood in two or three days, we're in the fridge! “, Smiles a hooded Corentin Horeau, referring to the small 4 ° C displayed on the thermometer.





    For the skipper of Sodebo Ultim 3, “Bonne-Espérance is the course of hope, it is also the course of decision, to go there or to turn around. »In this case, in agreement with the routing unit made up of Jean-Luc Nélias and Philippe Legros, Thomas Coville has chosen to continue the journey started on November 25:

    “Today, we believe that we are in honorable times, we know that the continuation to Cape Leeuwin (southwestern tip of Australia), or even to New Zealand, will be worse than what 'made our benchmark competitors (Idec Sport), but it was the moment when we had to make up our minds, we got started. "



    TRACKER


    And well started, since in Bonne-Espérance, Sodebo Ultim 3 was 17 hours and 35 minutes ahead of the scoreboard of the holder of the Jules Verne Trophy. This only confirms to Jean-Luc Nélias that the window chosen at the start was worth trying: “We respected the schedule for this window, we knew that it was not excellent, but the result is in line with what we had planned. "

    ICEBERGS UNDER SURVEILLANCE
    The rest of the program? “It promises to be more complicated than for Idec who had been straight to New Zealand,” he continues. We are going to have more tailwind and when we arrive towards Cape Leeuwin, there is a complex weather situation with either light or very bad weather, but it can also go very well. We will probably lose the lead accumulated so far, it would be good to be tied with Idec under New Zealand. This would make it possible to attack the Pacific with a chance of seizing the record.






    Until then, we will have to negotiate at best an Indian Ocean where a few icebergs and growlers have been spotted (pieces of ice that break off) that the crew and the routing cell are carefully monitoring, with the support of CLS, a specialized company. in their detection.

    “Unlike the Vendée Globe where an ice limit is imposed on all competitors, nothing constrains us, except the safety of the boat and especially the crew,” explains Jean-Luc Nélias. We have to take a little risk because the shortest route goes closer to the ice, it is a particular mix to find. As the smallest object detectable by satellite images measures 20 meters, we are also relying on statistics and our expertise. "






    Suffice to say that the time has come for the most extreme concentration, both aboard Sodebo Ultim 3 and at the Team's base in Lorient, where Jean-Luc Nélias and Philippe Legros are keeping an eye out: “The pace is intense here too, confirms the first. Between 7 a.m. and noon, we are in full swing, between videoconferences for ice cream, retrieving weather files, preparing bulletins and routing. The afternoon is more of follow-up, which allows us to take a nap or play sports. And at night, we also have shifts; we have the same alarms as on the boat: speed, heading, atmospheric pressure… we experience it like a ninth crew member. »Thoroughly ...

    To grab the Jules Verne Trophy, held since January 26, 2017 by Idec Sport in 40 days 23 hours 30 minutes and 30 seconds, Thomas Coville, François Duguet, Sam Goodchild, Corentin Horeau, Martin Keruzoré, François Morvan, Thomas Rouxel and Matthieu Vandame must cut the line at Ushant before Tuesday, January 5 at 2:25 am (French time, subject to WSSRC validation).
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  3. #13
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    Sodebo's Southern Ocean Sleigh Ride Continues



    Soon two weeks at sea for Sodebo Ultim 3 which continues to sail eastward and the Kerguelen archipelago, located a little over 1000 miles from its bow on Tuesday morning. After a day at 32 knots on average, Thomas Coville and his seven crew are still ahead of the Idec Sport chart (500 miles at 6am).

    Despite a fairly chaotic start to the Indian Ocean, as shown in the video sent on Monday by media man Martin Keruzoré, Sodebo Ultim 3 manages to maintain good speed: after a little over 13 days at sea, the trimaran has sailed 765 miles in the last 24 hours, averaging 32 knots. The conditions are underway, prompting Matthieu Vandame, coxswain / trimmer to say on Monday: “There are 30 knots established, a lot of seas, it's very cold, things are going very quickly, things are moving a lot, you have to keep on keeping up. "


    TRACKER




    The tempo remains high, the result of a permanent exchange between Thomas Coville at sea and the onshore routing unit made up of Jean-Luc Nélias and Philippe Legros. “We offer and they have it, it's always a loop between us,” explains Jean-Luc Nélias. We are a bit of a spur, but generally, the instructions we give them are achievable, we try to be realistic and we obviously take into account the problems on board. And with Thomas, we start to get used to working together. "

    Jean-Luc Nélias has indeed accompanied the skipper of Sodebo Ultim 3 on his attempts to set a single-handed round-the-world record for the Route du Rhum, but also at sea, especially last year on the Brest Atlantiques. This essential complicity allows the two men to agree on the rhythm to keep, even if it is above all nature that decides, according to the router: "The weather always requires going a little faster to avoid to be caught up by light winds or by a beating stroke; we decide on some adaptations, but overall, it's the weather that directs us and sets the tempo. "





    A weather which therefore remains currently strong for Sodebo Ultim 3, slightly raised in latitude last night, since it is moving at 48 ° 50 South, in a north-westerly flow which will gradually turn to the west. This will undoubtedly force the crew to stall one or more gybes on the Kerguelen route. And explains that the lead over Idec Sport, particularly swift four years ago on this part of the route, has dropped a little in 24 hours.

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    Pushing To The Limit




    The rough hours of the Indian
    More than 15 days at sea for Thomas Coville and his seven teammates who spent the night from Wednesday to Thursday under the Kerguelen, before gybing by 53 ° South just in front of Heard Island, which belongs to Australia. After an average day at 29 knots, Sodebo Ultim 3 remains ahead of the Idec Sport chart (160 miles at 6 o'clock).

    Air temperature 2 °, water temperature 2 ° C also, the cold is de rigueur this Thursday morning aboard Sodebo Ultim 3. After going very south, down to 53 °, the trimaran is elsewhere in the process of moving up on the port tack in a more manageable wind of around twenty knots to skirt an area of ​​icebergs identified on the starboard side.






    TRACKER



    On Wednesday, the living conditions on board remained difficult in heavy seas, as François Duguet said:

    “I feel good, it's an accomplishment to be in the Great South, a childhood dream, even if I don't hide the fact that there are little moments that are a bit difficult. The Indian is a tough, demanding ocean, the sea has been rough for two to three days, it's really hard to move around in the boat, there are constant acceleration and deceleration, everyday life is enough athletic. At the beginning, we are a little surprised, there are two or three of us who are slightly injured, but after 36 hours, we adapt, the human body is able to push its limits. We walk on all fours to prepare our food; Right now, I'm almost lying on the table so as not to smash myself every ten seconds in the front of the cockpit, we find tips, we are a bit like animals. We know that the Jules Verne Trophy is not a sprint, but an endurance race, sometimes you have to know how to keep your back round. "

    The annoyance of the day for the boat-captain of Sodebo Ultim 3: “The olive oil has frozen, it's very critical! On board, there is a whole bunch of Bretons who only eat butter, so they don't seem to take offense, but me, it bothers me a lot, because it's one of the important elements of my food, I hope that the tabasco will not freeze… ”

    Always very attentive to the boat, François Duguet estimates "the potential almost intact at this stage", the crew using in particular the many sensors on board, both to adjust it well, but also to measure the efforts that he supports: "As we spend most of the time confined in our small cell in front of the mast, the sensors help to have good setting marks on the appendages, the angles of attack of the foils, and to give us information on the constraints, even if they are sometimes put to the test: it happens that they send us erroneous information, in this case, we try to visually control, to put our head out of the window. "



    And on land, the technical team of the Sodebo team is watching:

    "The analysis of an engineer in the design office, quiet at his desk, allows us to have more precise answers and information than our on-board analysis, confirms the 39-year-old sailor. I compare it to F1: the driver is on the track, focused on moving the car forward, and on the wall, there are the engineers who see the numbers scrolling and analyze them. We are a bit the same. "





    *********************************





    Sodebo Ultim 3 began on the night of Tuesday to Wednesday its third week at sea in an Indian Ocean still quite chaotic. This explains the lower speeds than the previous days (25 knots over 24 hours) and a decrease over Idec Sport (235 miles at 6 o'clock). Thomas Coville and his teammates should spend the next night under the Kerguelen.

    Since the passage of Cap des Aiguilles on Monday morning, the “Sodeboys” have the right to the “shaker” version of the Indian Ocean with wind and rough seas that cannot be easily tamed. An Indian Ocean which brings back some memories to Sam Goodchild:

    “I already know the South a bit, because I had done a stage of the Global Ocean Race in Class40 between Cape Town and Wellington in 2011; I also came two years ago with Spindrift on the Jules Verne Trophy, we had passed just south of the Kerguelen, there was a little less sea, it was a little easier. "








    If the current living conditions on board are not obvious, this region of the globe remains a source of fascination for many sailors: "It is certain that the South Seas and the Indian Ocean are mythical places, confirms the native of Bristol. When you're young, you hear lots of stories about world tours, the Vendée Globe, The Ocean Race, the Jules Verne Trophy, so coming yourself is quite special, it doesn't. not happen ten times in a lifetime. We try to take advantage of it, these are intense experiences that will make us stronger in the future and also unite us as a crew. "

    How does he feel after two weeks at sea?

    “Overall, everything is fine. We all have mini-worries, because it's not easy what we make our body experience: we don't sleep as usual, we don't eat the same, there aren't five minutes in the day when things don't move and there is no noise, it's tiring, but it was expected. And we do everything we can to keep the body like the boat in shape. "

    And to regenerate morally, we sometimes send little words to our loved ones, which Sam Goodchild does regularly: "I just communicate with my family, it's always nice to keep the link with the land, to see what happens. at home and what to expect when we come back. We don't have a lot of time to devote to it, it's not very easy to send an email with the wind and the waves, but it's a little pleasure that I manage to take every two or three days . "

    On board, the crew also follows the wanderings of the Vendée Globe sailors, located in their north: “We look at the rankings on the computer, it's great to follow, we are much further south than them, but we experiences more or less the same things at the same times, ”concludes the man who dreams of one day racing around the world alone.
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    Sodebo Halts Jules Verne Record Attempt




    After a little over 16 days at sea, the crew of Sodebo Ultim 3 decided this Friday December 11 to stop their attempt on the Jules Verne Trophy.
    While navigating between the Kerguelen and Cape Leeuwin, at over 30 knots, Thomas Coville and his seven crew noticed damage to the starboard rudder. After several hours of hard work, discussions with the technical team on land, they had to face the facts.

    The repair no longer allows the boat to sail at 100% of its capacity in an attempt to beat the Jules Verne Trophy record, they have decided to interrupt their attempt, which began on November 25 at 2:55 a.m.

    Thomas Coville, François Duguet, Sam Goodchild, Corentin Horeau, Martin Keruzoré, François Morvan, Thomas Rouxel and Matthieu Vandame will have shown that Sodebo Ultim 3 has the potential to beat the Idec Sport record (40 days 23 hours and 30 minutes).

    It is therefore legitimately very disappointed that they give up following this round the world tour, but with the conviction that the record is within their reach.
    For the rest of the operations and logistical questions, they are heading for Reunion - 2300 miles from where they are now - in order to make the boat more reliable and return safely to Lorient.



    Patricia Brochard, co-president of Sodebo: “Getting involved in the Jules Verne Trophy requires a very high level of human and technical preparation. Thomas, François, Sam, Corentin, Martin, François, Thomas and Matthieu rose to this challenge and showed total mental and physical commitment. On land, the routing unit and the entire Lorient team were also admirable during this attempt. I want to thank them for all the work done. We have succeeded in making our audiences dream through this extraordinary adventure. This abandonment is of course a disappointment for all. But he will also be a trainer and learner in order to meet our next challenges. "
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